I just installed a new motherboard, how do i prevent having to reformat?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by AaronNWilson, Oct 29, 2002.

  1. AaronNWilson

    AaronNWilson Second Unit

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    I have an 80 gig drive with 60 gigs of stuff on there and for some reason after I took it out of my last mobo and plugged it into my new mobo I can't get it to boot. It will load fine in slave though and I can access the files on it.

    I want to be able to boot from it to prevent losing all my stuff. I have tried running chkdsk /r and fixboot and a western digital diagnostics program. I still can't boot from this drive.

    What other things should I try?

    I'm using windows XP Pro.
     
  2. Joel Mack

    Joel Mack Cinematographer

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    I move HDDs from motherboard to motherboard all the time, and don't have any problems booting.

    What kind of error message(s) are you getting?
     
  3. Joe Hsu

    Joe Hsu Supporting Actor

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    well, generally you won't be too successful with changing motherboards and keeping the same boot sector information on the hard drive. Joel, do you boot your OS off that same HDD every time?
    I would just say to find someone with some spare space and then back it up on there (someone like me, with 180 gigs, soon to be more), and then move it back over. I know it's tedious, but I really don't know what else there is for you.
    I found this site for you...maybe something on there will help.
    Could it possibly be something in your BIOS?
     
  4. Jeremy Anderson

    Jeremy Anderson Screenwriter

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    I was running XP Pro on my P3-700 and then built an Athlon 2200+ system to put my drive in... and same thing -- drive wouldn't boot with the new hardware.

    Here's what I did: Put the hard drive where it's supposed to be (master on first IDE channel). Go into bios and set it up so the CD-ROM boots before the hard drive. Put the XP Pro cd in the drive and boot from it. Go through like you're going to do a fresh XP Pro install. Eventually, it should say something like "There is an existing installation on this drive. Would you like to try to repair it?" Say yes... and it should make all the hardware changes in XP Pro without you losing a single thing. That should get you up and running. My brother and I have both done this, so I know it works.

    With Win9x you could swap drives all day long and it would just redetect the hardware. With XP and XP Pro, Microsoft kept the OS from booting after a major hardware change to guard against drive cloning (i.e. copying one hard drive to twenty others, which is a big piracy problem). That way, you need the installation CD and installation key.
     
  5. Mike_G

    Mike_G Screenwriter

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    I did the same thing this weekend. I went from an Asus P4T to an Asus P4S8X and the XP HD wouldn't boot at all.

    I wound up putting together a "Frankenstein" system of my old mobo, a Voodoo 3 2000 video card, the hard drive, my old network card, and a power supply just so that I could see the one system from the other over the network.

    I really, REALLY wish there was a better way to do this.

    Mike
     
  6. Kevin P

    Kevin P Screenwriter

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    Stuff like this is why I'm anti-copy-protection and refuse to go XP... but rants aside, how about getting another 80GB (or larger) hard drive, load a fresh copy of XP on it on the new MB, then slave the other drive and copy everything over? That way if something happens you have a backup, and it never hurts to have a spare drive, which can serve as a backup or as extra space if you run out of space. It never hurts to have a fresh install of any version of Windows, either...

    KJP
     
  7. Mike_G

    Mike_G Screenwriter

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    It has nothing to do with copy protection. The drivers for the motherboard wouldn't work with the new one so XP bluescreened. When did I say anything about copy protection?

    Jeremy: while what you say is true, you have three days to reactivate XP with the new (different) hardware. It's not immediate. During that time you're free to use XP while you move your software off the old hard drive and onto the new one.

    Mike
     
  8. KyleS

    KyleS Screenwriter

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  9. Joel Mack

    Joel Mack Cinematographer

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  10. Danny R

    Danny R Supporting Actor

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    You should be able to just reinstall the OS and it will fix the problem without losing any information.
     
  11. Josh Lowe

    Josh Lowe Screenwriter

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    IMO reinstalling your OS after switching to a different mobo would be a must. The drivers for the PCI bridges, IDE interfaces, motherboard chipset, etc etc are all different. There would be several major registry changes made. Chances are that there will be residual problems because of leftover registry entries, etc, used with the old mobo. It's just a best practice to do this..

    Same goes for switching to a different video card.

    Having recently done a similar upgrade, the most efficient solution is to simply buy a new hard drive, install the OS on it with your old drive in as a slave, copy your files over, and then either remove your old drive or keep it around as extra storage. With 80 gig 7200rpm hard drives right at the $100 mark, it's a relatively cheap and very fast solution.

     
  12. Jeremy Anderson

    Jeremy Anderson Screenwriter

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    Okay, I get the feeling that maybe I wasn't clear... so I'll try to clarify:

    When you change hardware (as in moving a drive to a new PC or changing motherboards), XP can't boot. All you do is BOOT FROM CD using the XP PRO install disc. Go through the steps to start installing XP PRO. When it gets to the point where it's looking for what drive to install to, it will detect that you already have XP installed on your machine and ask if you would like to repair the existing installation. What this does is reset all the drivers and redetect everything as if you were doing a fresh installation, but without having to actually reinstall the OS. After you do this, the correct hardware drivers will be installed and your system will be back up and running without losing a single thing. Again, this REPAIR function (which is NOT the repair/troubleshooting mode listed) merely resets and redetects all hardware.

    With Win9x, this wasn't a problem because it could fall back to generic drivers (since these drivers were often loaded as part of the shell anyway -- hence Win9x's inherent instability and memory bloat). With WinXP/XP Pro, these generic drivers are not loaded concurrently with the real drivers for your hardware, which is why you have to go through the redetection steps to get it to boot. As to whether you have to redo the activation process, I can not say. Neither myself or my brother had to after we changed hardware, but YMMV.
     
  13. Robert_Gaither

    Robert_Gaither Screenwriter

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    I would suggest for future troubleshooting that if a second HD is used to partition it first and then install the OS. I would recommend on the "C:" partition to only install the OS and install all other programs on the "D:", "E:", and etc partitions (this way you can always format the "C:" partition and open any of the other programs thru explorer and the icons in their respective folders). This also makes going to future OSes easier since all you'll have to do is either install it to another partition or format the "C:" and install it there and still maintaining all your other files.
     
  14. Robert Dunnill

    Robert Dunnill Second Unit

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    I had a problem like this with Win2K; the problem was that there wasn't a driver loaded for the IDE controller. I got around it by reinstalling the old mobo, installing a PROMISE third-party IDE host adapter and drivers, and then reinstalling the old motherboard, using the PROMISE card as the primary IDE adapter. Once Win2K had had a chance to boot up using the new motherboad, it then loaded the correct drivers, and I could shut the system down, remove the PROMISE card, and use the onboard IDE controller.

    RD
     
  15. Mark Giles

    Mark Giles Second Unit

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    I agree with J. Anderson.

    The same exact thing happen to me last night with my new motherboard. I couldn't boot from my main HD so I verified that it was the HD by using another HD. Since that worked I plugged the original HD back like normal. I was getting a "blue screen-windows must shut down your system" message. I've always had problems booting from CD so I used the six floppy discs that you can create from XP Pro. After going through the final disk, it asks you to press "r" to enter the repair console. I didn't press "r" here but did when it asked me to press "r" to repair Windows XP shortly after, I pressed it. It basicly ran through the entire XP installation process then returned me to my original windows configuration and programs with nothing lost!
     
  16. Ning Wong

    Ning Wong Stunt Coordinator

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    NO NEED TO REFORMAT!

    I do this crap all the time!

    What you need to do is to get your Windows XP pro cd, throw it in the drive, and set your comptuer to boot off the cd-rom it's in (thru hte bios).

    then go thru the options, and select the Repair installtion option. I"m pretty sure it's that option. I know it's Repair *something*.

    Just do that. None of your data will be lost. Everything will work w/your new hardware.
     

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