I have an idea

Discussion in 'TV on DVD and Blu-ray' started by Chris:L, Mar 29, 2004.

  1. Chris:L

    Chris:L Supporting Actor

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    What if when First Seasons don't sell well the production company can produce the same amount of copies the first season sold for the second season?
     
  2. Casey Trowbridg

    Casey Trowbridg Lead Actor

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    I'll save Gord the few seconds it would take for him to repeat himself and post his response to this idea from the between release thread.


    Its just not as simple as cutting the number of sets produced. If they're going to cut costs it would have to be on things like digital restoration and stuff. The types of things that would cost the same if they made a million sets or 10,000 sets.
     
  3. Randy A Salas

    Randy A Salas Screenwriter

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    That would do nothing to recoup the loss the company took on the first season. The price for the second season might also have to be higher, because the per-disc cost to make them would go up due to the lower numbers.
     
  4. David Von Pein

    David Von Pein Producer

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    The obvious answer to this continual problem would be to somehow get Donald Trump (or some other billionaire who wouldn't mind sinking several million into a TV-on-DVD project, and not worry about losing his silk shirt in the process) to foot the bill for Complete Series DVD releases of TV programs.

    This way, the fans could breathe easier. Well, everybody but Mr. Trump, who'll probably lose...what?...2.75 million alone when "Bridget Loves Bernie" doesn't sell very well -- although "Bridget" only ran just the one season (1972-1973; 24 eps.).

    Ya think Donald would go for it?

    Or -- Another idea would be to get the U.S. Defense Department to finance our DVD Wish Lists. Heck, they blow $299 for a screwdriver, right? What's a few billion for a few thousand TV-on-DVD boxed sets? Now...All we have to do now is figure out how to tie in "Sanford & Son" with the defense of our country.

    Hmmm. *strokes chin, pondering*

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Mark To

    Mark To Supporting Actor

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    Hey, whatever we have to do to get Bridget Loves Bernie, I'm in for!
     
  6. David Von Pein

    David Von Pein Producer

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    [​IMG]

    How about "The Misadventures Of Sheriff Lobo"?

    Now THAT series is BOUND to be a real winner, huh? (Right up there with "B.J. And The Bear").

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Chris:L

    Chris:L Supporting Actor

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    It was an afterthought.
     
  8. AnthonyC

    AnthonyC Cinematographer

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    My idea is similar to what Vox, a record company specializing in classical music, is doing. For titles that would probably have mediocre/poor sales, they produce the album on demand. It's $20 for a single disc, $30 for a double, and $40 for a triple, so that obviously must be changed for DVD boxed sets. But so studios don't lose any money, how about for titles like MTM season 2, a six-disc box for $50 or so. Sure, the price is higher than what it would be in Wal-Mart or on Amazon, but at least it's available, and the studio makes a profit. The only bad things are they probably wouldn't include many extras (if any), and I'm sure they wouldn't go to great lengths to remaster them.

    I'm new here, sorry for the long post. I promise not to post many more missives in the future![​IMG]
     
  9. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

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    So basically you're paying top dollar for a burned dvd with unrestored broadcast video-- which you could do the same for many things by taping them off nick and night and burning your own discs. [​IMG]


    Something about buy a DVD-R burned in the office at Fox doesnt seem all that appealing, or likely.

    -Vince
     
  10. AnthonyC

    AnthonyC Cinematographer

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    But there's just something special knowing that it was official. For me, at least. I rarely listen to CD-Rs; I always listen to my regular CDs.
     
  11. KerryK

    KerryK Stunt Coordinator

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    Back to the orginal argument, if you burn off 100 copies for special orders, it still has to be encoded. And where is this supposed to be stored? If you're just burning DVD-Rs (which I can tell you are notoriously buggy and difficult to play) it has to be stored somewhere, apparently forever under this scheme. That'll cost a lot of money in the long run.
     
  12. Deb Walsh

    Deb Walsh Stunt Coordinator

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    I dunno, I find the idea of DVD on demand kind of appealing - there are so many shows I'd just like to *see* let alone have on disc. One-season wonders, unaired episodes, etc. Stuff that doesn't have a big enough following to get a normal release. To be able to order episodes like that from a back catalogue would be fabulous, IMHO.

    Of course, the upfront cost of digitizing (not even including restoration or cleanup of any kind) entire catalogues would be enormous, so even though the idea sounds feasible in terms of disc production, preparation itself would be pretty daunting.
     

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