I have a big echo

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by Steve*_P, Feb 9, 2005.

  1. Steve*_P

    Steve*_P Agent

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    My living room is 17 1/2 feet long by 14 1/5 feet wide, with a ceiling that one side goes up to 30 feet and angels down to the other side of the room to ten feet. There is a big picture window in the room and also a door with glass in that next to the window. There is a skylight on the highest part of the ceiling. there is a nasty echo in the room whether you clap or even talk. Would some acoustic panels help solve this problem and where might I put them or go about finding where I should put them.


    Thank You
    Steve
     
  2. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    Steve,

    When it comes to good acoustics, a simple rule of thumb is “hard surfaces are bad, soft surfaces are good.”

    Your best bet for those glass widows and doors would be to cover them with heavy drapes. I’m sure you can’t do anything about the glass ceiling, but wall-to-wall carpet on the floor would help a lot. Acoustic panels would be good treatment for large uninterrupted lengths of wall, as would normal household items like bookcases, etc.

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  3. Steve*_P

    Steve*_P Agent

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    I have wall to wall. I do have a lot of empty walls I'm afraid of making the room to dead. I guess what I should do is just buy one panel at a time, but it seems liek teh echo get trapped in the opening of the skylight.


    Steve
     
  4. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    See the builder forum, and also see F. Alton Everest's Master Handbook of Acoustics.

    There are a number of ways to guesstimate the RT60 time of your room, and figure out how much absorbtion you need to get a room with good decay without being too dead.
     

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