I got DSL TODAY Yaaaaa HOOooooooo

David McGough

Second Unit
Joined
Nov 26, 1999
Messages
277
i lied another question,,, The 1.20 I now get is my down? what measures the up.
I see 1.5/396 1.5 I take it is the Mbps what is the other. Were do you get that reading?
 

Marko Berg

Supporting Actor
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Mar 22, 2002
Messages
856

If I understood your question correctly, this is true for routed connections, but not for bridged connections.
 

David McGough

Second Unit
Joined
Nov 26, 1999
Messages
277
I got a 1230 download and 211 up.. how does that rate.
My wife and I did hear a crackling noise when on the phone. Sometimes are worse than others. I have all my filters on. Anything else to do about that.
I can live with it, now the wife is fussing to do someting.
Houston we have a problem..
 

Bryan X

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Assuming you mean 1,230Kbps and 211Kbps-- that's 1.23Mbps download and 211Kbps upload.


Well, that depends. Compared to most broadband it's pretty slow. For comparison, my Roadrunner Cable Connection averages about 5.00Mbps (I think my upload speed is around 768Kbps, but that number isn't as critical for most users). And my connection is probably just average for cable users.

BUT, the real question is how does it rate compared to what level of service you are paying for. If you bought 1.5Mbps service, that's not too bad. If you bought 3.0Mbps service, that sucks. But again, as someone earlier mentioned, give it a few days to ramp up. Then test again. I'm not all that familiar with the peculiarities of DSL that way.

You didn't put a filter on the line going to the DSL modem did you? From what I understand, that is a big no-no.
 

David McGough

Second Unit
Joined
Nov 26, 1999
Messages
277
Yes I did... I have a filter going to the modem.
The instructions show putting a filter on the modem phone jack?? I will take it off to see.
 

melchioe

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Dec 11, 2006
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Ed Melchior
Couple of quick things -

- never turn off the DSL modem. You do not "dial into the modem" - the modem is always connected. A router has nothing to do with it. It is an always-on connection that has some similarities to an old dialup modem, but it is used entirely differently.

- a router on the inside (to allow you to hook up multiple PCs, usually) has nothing to do with whether you keep the DSL modem on. The router's only function is to allow multiple PCs (or other devices like a Slingbox, printers, disk farms, etc.) to attach to the network at the same time as the main PC. Oh, and a router (at least most Linksys, Dlink, Netgear, etc) usually has a firewall built in as well. But it really has nothing to do with how you use the DSL modem and when you turn on/off the DSL modem.

- IMPORTANT - if you do not have a router or a firewall, and you have your one PC directly connected to the DSL modem, make sure you have a software firewall running. If you don't, you'll be a large target on the Internet for hackers. Many DSL providers (like AT&T) integrate firewall software into their packages, but it's not really clear to non-expert users that it's even running.

- the filters SHOULD have nothing to do with data transmission or speed. The sole purpose of the filters are to keep noise out of your telephones. The DSL connection will generate some audible noise that will annoy your or interrupt your conversations if the filters are not in place.
Something that has not been mentioned yet is that DSL and voice come over the same wires, just at different frequencies (higher pitches). Most of the DSL traffic is at a higher frequency than my old ears can hear, but some of it leaks over into the audible range, and that's what the filters are for.

- If you put a filter on the line between the DSL modem and the wall, YOU WILL EFFECTIVELY FILTER OUT AT LEAST PARTS OF THE DSL signal (probably most of it, actually) and experience either VERY SLOW CONNECTIONS or dropped connections on the computer.

- Comparing speed of DSL and Cable is akin to comparing apples to oranges. DSL is a "switched" connection and cable is a "shared" connection. (In general, switched is better - if anyone's interested, I'd be happy to post a comparison of them). 5Mbps cable is not necessarily faster than 1.5Mbps DSL. In cable connections, you CAN be greatly affected by what your neighbors are doing. In DSL connections, you generally are not affected by neighbors (unless a whole lot of them are doing a whole lot all at once).

In many cases, the capacity (not speed) at your home connection will exceed the capabilities of the source network (like CNN or YouTube). The larger number in the throughput measures is the download capacity (from YouTube to you), and the smaller number is the upload capacity (from you to your email provider when you send out pictures to your relatives). Since most individuals do much more downloading than sending stuff out, this makes a fair amount of sense. Note that this will be different in most workplaces, at least if the workplace uses something other than DSL or cable.

My bonafides: I've been a network engineer for about 20 years, and have designed and supported Ethernet networks of over 20,000 users. I've been a phone tech for longer than that, and installed and fixed more phone lines than I can count. That's not to say I don't make mistakes, but I'm pretty confident that the above is accurate.
 

Todd H

Go Dawgs!
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If I'm remembering how the filters I got from Bellsouth work, the filter plugs into the wall and has two output jacks on it...one for the phone and one for the DSL modem. Make sure to plug the modem into the modem output. Of course, this only applies if you are planning to use a phone and the modem on the same jack. If you're not planning on doing this, then don't use a filter and plug the modem straight into the wall.
 

MarkHastings

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Jan 27, 2003
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It's been a while since I've set mine up, but this is correct.

The DSL modem should have a phone output on the back that you can plug a phone into since the modem needs to be plugged directly into the wall.

The filters are used to block the data portion of the DSL signal so you don't get interference on your phone lines.
 

David McGough

Second Unit
Joined
Nov 26, 1999
Messages
277
Todd H said:
If I'm remembering how the filters I got from Bellsouth work, the filter plugs into the wall and has two output jacks on it...one for the phone and one for the QUOTE]


My set up came with 3 filters. One of the filters as you said has two connectors. One for the Modem and one for the phone. This tells me yes your suppose to use a filter to the modem. I will however check to see if there is a difference.
 

MarkHastings

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Jan 27, 2003
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Ah yes! That was it. The splitter has a filtered and an unfiltered port. But it's probably best to avoid the filter and connect the modem directly to the jack (if you can live without a phone in that area).

I did this in my new condo. I connected the modem directly to the only phone jack in my "computer room", then I got one of those cordless phones with the satellite handsets and just plugged the charger in that room....that way, there's no need for a phone jack for that phone.
 

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