I got a new tv set samsung 47 inch RP

Discussion in 'Displays' started by TheBat, Jan 28, 2005.

  1. TheBat

    TheBat Producer

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    Jacob
    I finally got a big tv.. I had done some research on some tvs for a while mainly going for a 36 size.. figure it would be too big (weightwise for the stand).. I decided to go with a samsung 47 inch RP. got a free stand with it.

    I did have to put the stand together, with a help from a family friend.. that took a bit.. went smoother then I thought it would be. I had to set up the dvd, tivo, and reciever in the stand. I live in a 2 bedroom condo. The size is just right for my condo.. its big.. but still not overly big..

    I had a 27 panasonic tv set. it was hard to read the text on the screen. no problem with the big tv.

    I had to make some asjustments to the tv with the color and stuff like that.. as first it was hard to get it to work well. but then I got it just right for dvds.. and it really shows.. most of my dvds just look fantastic on the big screen. Even the region 2 version of fifth element looked fine to me.
    Here is the really weird question.. i am a big widescreen person.. I do have some full screen dvds, I was surprise to see the screen fill up with the full frame version.. I was curious for that.. I do have it set for 16x9.

    I also have serveral modes on the tv for the picture..which setting do you have it set at most times?
    I heard that you can get burnout with watching letterbox movies?
    thanks,
    JACOB
     
  2. Craig

    Craig Second Unit

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    If you have your contrast set at a moderate level you don't have to worry about burn-in from the black bars from widescreen sources. I've had my 56" widescreen Toshiba for a little over 5 years and have watched hundreds of movies with the bars on top & bottom, and also many, many hours of 4:3 material with bars on the side, and I don't have any burn-in. I'd say keep your contrast below 50%, it's the contrast that can cause burn-in if you have it cranked too high. You can bump up the brightness if you need to and still be safe as far as burn-in. Try setting your brightness a little above the level of your contrast and see how the picture looks.

    Be careful with the level of sharpness, on many sets sharpness will add an artificial outline around objects and on my Toshiba turning sharpness way up causes a grainy appearance. Try sharpness below 50% (maybe way below).

    Whether or not 4:3 material fills the screen is determined by what picture mode you have your TV set to. You should have a standard mode which will show 4:3 material with black bars on the side.

    Most sets also have one or two stretch & zoom modes for expanding 4:3 material to fill the screen. There will also be a mode for watching anamorphic (enhanced for widescreen) dvds. If you watch regular 4:3 material in the anamorphic/enhanced mode you'll notice objects in the picture will look compressed (short and fat), although the picture will fill the screen. Similarly if you watch anamorphic material in the wrong mode you'll get objects looking tall and thin.
     
  3. TheBat

    TheBat Producer

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    If you have your contrast set at a moderate level you don't have to worry about burn-in from the black bars from widescreen sources. I've had my 56" widescreen Toshiba for a little over 5 years and have watched hundreds of movies with the bars on top & bottom, and also many, many hours of 4:3 material with bars on the side, and I don't have any burn-in. I'd say keep your contrast below 50%, it's the contrast that can cause burn-in if you have it cranked too high. You can bump up the brightness if you need to and still be safe as far as burn-in. Try setting your brightness a little above the level of your contrast and see how the picture looks.

    i will take a look at the contrast and brightness.

    Be careful with the level of sharpness, on many sets sharpness will add an artificial outline around objects and on my Toshiba turning sharpness way up causes a grainy appearance. Try sharpness below 50% (maybe way below).

    I have the sharpness down to 0..

    thanks.

    JACOB
     

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