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I couldn't care less, but...

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Haggai, Feb 18, 2004.

  1. Haggai

    Haggai Producer

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    ...I've noticed something in recent times. Many people who are trying to say that they care very little about a particular thing are saying "I could care less" when in fact the logical thing to say is "I couldn't care less." The point, of course, is that you've reached the lowest possible level of how little you care about something, and there's no lower level of caring about it for you to reach, so you could NOT care any less. If you COULD care less, it means that you DO care about it to some extent, since you're still capable of caring less, so that form of the phrase is basically meaningless.

    Just wanted to throw this out there. [​IMG]
     
  2. Matt Pelham

    Matt Pelham Screenwriter

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    I could care less about this thread.
     
  3. BrettB

    BrettB Producer

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    This thread is rediculous.
     
  4. Haggai

    Haggai Producer

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    Yes, I know, it's pretty pointless. But has anyone else noticed this? It seems like a common mistake people are making these days.
     
  5. John Watson

    John Watson Screenwriter

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    Just as stupid is when they say they "luck out" when luck in would be more meaningful.

    Wonder what they think "outta luck" means ?
     
  6. Jeremiah

    Jeremiah Screenwriter

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    Yeah, "Could care less" and "Couldn't care less" is the most miss used phrase I hear. I remember on another message board I said I couldn't care less and someone tried to correct me. LOL.

    Hey, I was getting a lap dance months ago and the stripper corrected me when I used a double negative.
     
  7. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    That would be "misused phrase."

    Another one that people get wrong nearly all the time: The correct way to state the phrase about someone trying to have it both ways is to say, "He is trying to eat his cake and have it too."

    Not the other way around. What's so odd about "having a cake and eating it too"? Nothing. That's the way it normally happens. To have meaning, the phrase must be stated as in the previous paragraph.
     
  8. MikeSerrano

    MikeSerrano Second Unit

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    I could care less, but I can't be bothered to do so.

    -Mike
     
  9. Haggai

    Haggai Producer

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    Ha, that's pretty classic, surely that could be the basis for a scene/running joke in a movie?
     
  10. Rob Gillespie

    Rob Gillespie Producer

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    If someone says it, just respond with "Exactly how much less could you care then?"
     
  11. Garrett Lundy

    Garrett Lundy Producer

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    The 'could/couldn't' phrase was drilled into my elementary class by one of the teachers. As a result I have always used "couldn't care less", but people saying "could care less" doesn't bother me.

    But nowadays I ususally use "I could give a rat's ass", which really, doesn't have any logical meaning. But I say it anyway. But more meaning so than "I could give a whooping funk" or "I could give a flying fuck".
     
  12. Ken Chan

    Ken Chan Producer

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    Yes, it's annoying. At this point, the difference between "could" and "couldn't" in that phrase is like the difference between "flammable" and "inflammable" -- what's up with that?

    "Luck out" could have originated from lucking out of a bad situation.

    You cannot simultaneously "have a cake [for the long term]and eat it too", but it would be expected to have a cake "and then" eat it, while you could not do the reverse.

    Perhaps the most common error on the internet is using "it's" for "its". The reverse does not happen very often, but another one is to use "'s" for plural, and there's hardly any reason for that.
     
  13. Greg*go

    Greg*go Supporting Actor

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    Well, I supposed I can argue about this, but its the principal of the matter that I ain't gonna, thats all.
     
  14. Dave Simpson

    Dave Simpson Second Unit

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    More wacky stuff:

    -often seen on message boards: "I'd be pretty weary of buying Brand X". This one drives me nuts, I tell ya. If you are cautioning your pal against buying Bose or some other junk, then you are suggesting he be wary or leery. But not weary, right?
    -all time fave: "your" and "you're". And "whose" and "who's".
    -lastly, I don't believe this one is incorrect, but simply that it's a matter of style. Here's an example that quite puts me off: "That new movie Identity is somewhat of a shocker, isn't it?" To my way of thinking, this is just wrong. More elegant phrasing: "That new movie Identity is somewhat shocking, isn't it?" or, more preferably, "That new movie Identity is something of a shocker, isn't it?"
    As for the thread's original thrust, I side with the crowd that couldn't care less (isn't the opposite of this phrase "I could care more"?).
    Cheers.

    DS.
     
  15. Dave Simpson

    Dave Simpson Second Unit

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    By the way,


    I find this strangely intriguing and alluring. I ought to get out to the local ballet a bit more often. Cheers.

    DS.
     
  16. Yee-Ming

    Yee-Ming Producer

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    Also reminds me of when Luke asks Artoo during the trench run, about some loose flap, he says "see if you can't lock it down". Why not "see if you can lock it down?"

    I know the former isn't wrong, just a different emphasis (along the lines of glass half-empty v. half-full?) I'm just wondering why? I've noticed this "see if you can't do something" phraseology with an American client I deal with regularly, whereas just about everyone else I know would say "see if you can do something"

    Is this an accurate comment on American linguistics?

    (As an aside, on a football -- soccer to you lot -- mailing list I'm on, someone recently pissed off a lot of other members by continuing to mail his fictional drivel, using our team's players as characters, to the list. When called on it, he claimed to have won several writing and linguistics awards -- but the very email bragging about said awards contained at least three errors, e.g. using "they're" instead of "their")

    I too would be very intrigued by the exact circumstances in which this arose (pun somewhat intended).

    Also reminds me when I organised a bachelor party some years ago, the stripper was better educated than half the guys in the room: we all had degrees, but she had a master's and only half the guys had done post-grad degrees -- not including me. [​IMG]
     
  17. Timon Russo

    Timon Russo Stunt Coordinator

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    The whole "could care less" thing is pretty bothersome to me too. I am constantly astounded by the sheer number of otherwise intelligent people who misuse the phrase, but it has not shaken my resolve! They will be... corrected.
     
  18. Max Leung

    Max Leung Producer

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    It's spelt ridiculous not rediculous. Ugh.

    I could care less if they spelled it right, but I can't.
     
  19. Josh Simpson

    Josh Simpson Supporting Actor

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    Yes, it's annoying to me how often that phrase is misued, but you know, I could care less. [​IMG] I also agree with many of the others being mentioned. I know no one's perfect, but shouldn't we try and better our vocabulary and speech the best we can?
     
  20. Carl Miller

    Carl Miller Screenwriter

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    I couldn't care less about caring less.

    However people who throw the word "be" into every sentence annoy the crap out of me.

    "Don't you think you should be leaving for work now"? What's wrong with "Don't you think you should leave for work now"?

    "He shouldn't be doing that". Or, "he shouldn't do that".
     

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