HVAC question.

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Philip Hamm, May 21, 2004.

  1. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    Hey any HVAC experts here?

    I was wondering, do pleated filters make my HVAC system less efficient? It seems like there would need to be much more energy expended in drawing air through a pleated filter than the standard cheapo filters. Any opinions?
     
  2. Eric Kahn

    Eric Kahn Guest

    Pleated filters are much better at filtering than the ceapo ones, they might reduce airflow by 1% but not by nuch, but they will keep the evaprator (cooling) coil much cleaner so it will work better
     
  3. John*C

    John*C Stunt Coordinator

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    Simple flushing of filter with soapy water then clean water, let it completely dry then reuse. Screw the prices wanted for new filters.


    Like Printer's ink they over charge for a few ml(28.5 ml equals 1 ounce), the same goes for a new filter that can be reusable like the above printer ink. I have been told the first refill was used in World war 2, when your Zippo lighter went dry or flints wore down you bought a refill, *not* a new Zippo cigarette lighter.
     
  4. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

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    they really do rape you for the pleated filters at most places.

    I have heard of them causing problems in a couple really rare cases, if you really wanted to know have a service person come out and look at the pressures with both types of filter. If your return is marginal like most new houses it really could make a difference.
     
  5. Wayne Ernst

    Wayne Ernst Cinematographer

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    Actually, the reusable filters are the first things that should be thrown out. They are some of the worst filters to use. I've had plenty of discussions with HVAC people who've all indicated the same thing.

    Also, it's best to get the filters away from the furnace/a.c. if you can. Lowes sells cold air return vents that accept filters. Granted, you'll need a few of them - which means more filters, but you'll keep a whole lot of dust out of the intake vents for your cooling system. It takes a little work to retrofit these grilles because builders just slap on $5.00 grills over the drywall. But, the time spent doing this modification is more than worth it.

    Also, if you are looking for cheaper pleated filters, Home Depot has 3-packs for under $8.00 available in most sizes.
     
  6. Keith Mickunas

    Keith Mickunas Cinematographer

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    This is what I get. They're like a white fiberglass material or something, and claim to be pretty good. Just change them every few months, it's only a few bucks.
     
  7. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

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    That's awfully optomistic in this day and age. Around here houses usually have one central, inadequate return.
     
  8. Cary_H

    Cary_H Second Unit

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    Sorry Phillip.....once again I was a victim to being logged out while composing a long-winded reply.
    Here's a short recap.
    Pleats offer more surface face area than a conventional filter. They can hang in under higher air velocities and pressures.
    They cost more 'cause they require more time to construct, use superior medias, and more of it.
    Try a simple test between a pleat and what you've been using. At the farthest diffuser on your run secure a fine plastic bag like one from a drycleaner tightly around the register. Cut a small hole in it to allow flowthrough of air. Keep cutting a bigger hole 'til the inflation of the bag give you a distinct indication of the static pressure from one to the other, your loss, if any.
    If your blower motor's current draw remains in range you ought to be fine.
     
  9. Wes

    Wes Screenwriter

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    Location:
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    Wes Peterson
    This last winter I replaced my usual pleated with a Life-time $20. electrostatic washable from Home Depot. I always replace my pleated twice a year so in just a few years this will pay for it's self, and save me trips to HD were I end up spending more money every trip.

    Wes
     
  10. Todd Hochard

    Todd Hochard Cinematographer

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    As noted, pleated filters offer more surface area, and most offer better filtration and MORE capacity than cheapo spun filters.

    Consider this- how much energy/money is saved by using a cheapo filter, if the cheapo allows dirt and such to accumulate on the coils? That reduces heat transfer capacity.

    I use a high quality pleated filter- 3M's Filtrete Ultra Allergen. http://www.google.com/search?sourcei...ultra+allergen
    $15 or so every 3 months (since I live in FL, my AC runs a lot, of course). It seems pricey, but it's well worth it. And, note that the higher quality filters, such as these, have higher flow rates.

    I've haven't needed to clean the coils in my AC unit for YEARS (and my system can run upwards of 11 hours/day runtime in the summer). I've recently checked them- still nothing there.

    Todd
     
  11. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    Thanks for the input everyone. I'll stick with the pleated filters for the time being.
     

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