Humidity: Life Expectancy of DVD vs Tape

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Bryant Trew, Jul 3, 2002.

  1. Bryant Trew

    Bryant Trew Second Unit

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    In another thread someone said that DVD and tape formats are equally a problem in humid climates. I just wanted to clarify that this is absolutely not so. Once the humidity gets to a tape (mildew), it is destroyed. I have never had a DVD get destroyed from mildew. At worst there is a spot or two which wipes completely clean off the disc. And, it takes well over a year of keeping a case closed before a disc would spot. Wipe clean, problem solved.

    Tape has moving parts and DVD does not. Even a little bit of stickyness in the air does the tape damage, and it tales no more than three months. Mildew, folds and cracks is what I've had to live with, and oh, let's not forget the tape snapping on those rare occaisions!

    I've been tape-free for six maybe seven years now, and I couldn't be happier. There is no way I'm going back to such a format.
     
  2. Chet_F

    Chet_F Supporting Actor

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    I have yet to see a company make tape that is impervious to the elements, i.e. dust, humidity, fingerprints, normal wear and tear. I had a audio tape collection(good size) and had problem after problem. I still have a vhs tape collection and had problems after problems. Now most of these problems fall around the media and the playback of that media. That being said DVD's only suffer from a scratch if you do scratch it and fingerprints. Either of these can be resolved. One easier then the other. If you scratch or rinkle a tape you are screwed. There is no way around that. I already made the mistake(twice unfortunatley) of investing into a format(tape) that has monumentally failed!!!!. Why would I ever make that mistake a third time. I will not. DVD's or optical media do not suffer like tape does. They may eventually degrade after XXX amount of years but I will be long gone before that and I will not be bringing my DVD collection with me(not enough room j/k).
    I see a great deal of resentment towards me when I post my strong feelings on this subject. If you have a problem with my opinion then fine. But don't go attack me because I will not bow down to your opinions.
    I see the real problem here is the casual HT guy and the professional HT guy(if i can call them that). The difference here for the most part is money. Some people can spend $3,000 dollars on a peice of equip without thinking about it. I can not do that and probably will never do that. I also have a great deal of anger with the studios trying to take the tape format back. It is immensely more profitable for them than DVDs. Case in point: Who of you have replaced tapes because they look awful from degradation??? I will bet that you have replaced them with DVDs. Now, how many of you have replaced DVDs? I'm sure not as many. Due to the fact that DVDs are a relatively new format(6-7 yrs?) this opinion may change. I sincerely doubt this though based on the CD collection(optical media) that I have had for 12 years. I have yet to have a CD, or DVD for that matter, fail due to deterioration.
    My piont to this was: Why wouldn't studios back a format that they know is eventually going to degrade(in 5 or 10 years) then say HD-DVD? They want your money. plain and simple. They know if they can force you to pay for the same movie they will. They did it with audio tapes and vhs tapes. Why would studios go backwards with technology? Same answer....to make more money. Now for some people money isn't an issue but for me it is. I'll stick with media I know will survive the elements and not degrade. Of course I'm speaking from what I have read so far and from my own personal experience.
    Thanks Bryant Trew for giving me a thread for my rant [​IMG]
    I am in the same school of though as you are obviously.
    Chet
     
  3. Bryant Trew

    Bryant Trew Second Unit

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    Hey Chet,

    Funny thing is I've spent upwards of $30k on my home theater, and I can buy HD-VHS at any time. I just see it as a poor investment adding nothing substantial justifying the costs to my home theater experience.

    Where I live tape doesn't last at all, and I don't mind waiting for a durable format. It doesn't have to be optical based, but it better be durable.
     
  4. Yee-Ming

    Yee-Ming Producer

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    hear hear. it's far worse in the tropics, where VHS tapes get mouldy quite quickly. even CDs (and presumably DVDs) get mouldy, but as Chet pointed out it's a simple matter to wipe the spot off, in contrast to a VHS tape. I guess that's why the VCD format took off in a big way in Asia (even legit ones, leaving aside pirate VCDs) since the discs are more durable than tapes.
     
  5. Bryant Trew

    Bryant Trew Second Unit

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    I'm from Bermuda, so I get the humidity really bad. Nevertheless, there are some parts of the United States that get really humid too. I can't imagine it being much better in the Southern states at all.
     
  6. Joseph Bolus

    Joseph Bolus Cinematographer

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    Guys, there is no question that any optical-based consumer format is going to be more durable than a tape-based consumer format.
    I don't see a point to even arguing this fact.
    As has been pointed out repeatedly here and elsewhere, D-VHS is not a threat to the DVD format!!
    The D-VHS format is designed mainly to provide ready hi-def material of familiar movies to help sell Hi-Def monitors at the retail level; and to temporarily satiate the hard-core movie enthusiast who owns the appropriate equipment.
    Everybody knows that when the HD-DVD format premiers in a few years, it will "walk all over" D-VHS, just as DVD "walked over" LD.
    Here's a realistic forecast for you for the year 2005:
    Number of dedicated DVD players in use in this country alone by the year 2005: 60 million.
    Number of additional DVD-enabled viewing devices in this country alone by the year 2005: (includes video-game consoles and HTPC's) : 40 million.
    Number of D-VHS decks in use in this country by the year 2005: 750 thousand.
    Now I ask you: How can that be considered a threat to the DVD format???
    And by the time D-VHS approaches the 2 million number (if it ever does) it will be blown out of the water by HD-DVD.
    So cool it already!!!
    Our favorite format is not going anywhere.
     
  7. Yumbo

    Yumbo Cinematographer

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    bula,

    just wanted to state that DVD is just as susceptible to humidity as tape, but is not affected in the way tape is - playback.

    furthermore, it is not a matter of wiping off simply. it does NOT come off, in the case of double sided discs (stored in case logic pouches), especially so from Warner. Columbia fares better than Fox as well.

    just the facts.
     
  8. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Joseph states the issues correctly:

    D-VHS D-Theater poses no threat to DVD-Video--except in comparison tests regarding picture quality. D-Theater most likely is an interim format, and whatever can be done to provide more and superior content for high-definition home theater should be welcomed.

    No one if forcing anyone to buy into the new format.

    But talk to those who have seen it demonstrated. Read about D-Theater in the multi-issue saga unfolding in the pages of Widescreen Review. Sometimes, viewers feel that the D-Theater image of a film is superior to that produced by a release print.

    That's pretty compelling.

    All of which might end up hastening the debut of a high-def DVD format, not impeding it.
     
  9. Bryant Trew

    Bryant Trew Second Unit

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    Chris,

    I don't know if you have some kind of killer mold where you live, but I've never seen a mold spot on a DVD that can't be wiped off. AND such spots only show up long after a VHS has long been destroyed. Get mold on a VHS and it is destroyed. And let's not forget that the mold on a dirty tape does a number on your player as well!
     
  10. Yumbo

    Yumbo Cinematographer

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    where it always rains baby.

    see my tag.

    I can show you pictues of said discs, hundreds of them.
     
  11. RAF

    RAF Lead Actor

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    Entropy Rules, gang!
    And Magnetic Media provides a much easier environment than optical media for nature to do its thing. Not that discs are free from the inevitabilities of entropy.
    They just slow it down a bit. Most of us will outlive tapes. Most discs will outlive us.
    [​IMG]
     
  12. Mark Hanson

    Mark Hanson Agent

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    After building a wine cellar with proper humidity and temperature control for that commodity. The thought is in some areas is that is what is needed for other items of value.

    I can see the ads in Wine Spectator now, great for your wine collection with space for your DVD's at 100 dollars with space for tapes add 300 dollars.

    I can it two pleasures at once, It is dark, cool, maybe not a bad place to put the thea....
     
  13. Jeff Pryor

    Jeff Pryor Supporting Actor

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    Since I live in an area that's VERY humid this time of year, I've always taken great care with my VHS and audio cassettes, keeping them free of dust and in a cool, dark area. Never had a problem with my tapes at all, and some of them are well over 15 years old.
     
  14. Jenna

    Jenna Second Unit

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