DVD Review HTF Review: Thunderbirds - International Rescue Edition (Recommended)

Discussion in 'DVD' started by Jason Perez, Jul 19, 2004.

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  1. Jason Perez

    Jason Perez Second Unit

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    [​IMG]


    Thunderbirds: International Rescue Edition





    Studio: MGM
    Year: 1966 and 1968
    Rated: See Below
    Film Length: See Below
    Aspect Ratio: 16x9 Enhanced Widescreen (2.35:1) – Both films
    Subtitles: English, French, and Spanish
    Audio: English - Dolby Digital 5.1, DTS 5.1 and Monaural; French and Spanish – Monaural






    Release Date:
    July 20th, 2004




    The Thunderbirds television series (which spanned 32 episodes from 1965-1966), brainchild of the innovative Gerry and Sylvia Anderson, utilized highly detailed marionettes and miniatures to bring a futuristic world of intrigue and action to life. Set in the relatively near future (2065 A.D.), the series chronicled the adventures of the Tracy clan, who operated a world famous, high-tech rescue service, known as “International Rescue”.

    Overseen from the top-secret Tracy Island by the über-rich former astronaut Jeff Tracy (Peter Dyneley), International Rescue used five highly advanced spacecraft to help save those in mortal danger, all piloted by Jeff’s brave sons: Alan (Matt Zimmerman), Gordon (David Graham), John (Ray Barrett), Scott (Shane Rimmer), and Virgil (Jeremy Wilkin). The Tracy clan, working in concert with the mental giant known as “Brains” (also voiced by David Graham) and the glamorous British agent, Lady Penelope (Sylvia Anderson), traveled to all corners of the globe to help those in need of saving.

    For identification purposes, the Thunderbirds correspond to numbered vehicles/stations as follows (with a short description of each):

    Scott Tracy – Thunderbird 1 (a speedy, olive-green rocketship)
    Virgil Tracy – Thunderbird 2 (a large, forest green transport)
    Alan Tracy – Thunderbird 3 (a red spacecraft designed for space rescues)
    Gordon Tracy – Thunderbird 4 (a yellow submarine – no, not that yellow submarine! [​IMG] )
    John Tracy – Thunderbird 5 (the space station from which John monitors conditions on Earth – the poor chap never gets to have much fun!)

    They also worked with:

    Lady Penelope Creighton-Ward, who owned Fab 1, the ultra-cool amphibious Pink Rolls Royce!

    Now, without further adieu, here is an overview of the two feature films that were based upon the television series:


    THUNDERBIRDS ARE GO! (1966)
    Rated: Not Rated
    Running Time: 94 Minutes

    Created by Gerry and Sylvia Anderson, Thunderbirds Are Go was the first feature-length motion picture based on the popular Thunderbirds television program, and debuted towards the end of the series’ brief run. This time, however, the production budget was much larger, so the puppets, miniature vehicles and sets, and costumes were all much grander. The plot was similar though, as little wooden characters were put in precarious positions that only the International Rescue team could help save them from.

    To be sure, this probably is not one of the more memorable of the Thunderbirds’ rescue missions/adventures, as the International Rescue team disappears for a long period of screen time after the Zero-X safely begins its journey to Mars. Still, the sheer majesty of such passionate and innovative marionette-work demands respect. And this installment is not without its positives – notably the greater role played by British agent, Lady Penelope Creighton-Ward and her loyal driver, Parker (yet another voice by David Graham), whose sophisticated adventuring is a nice change of pace from the stoic, “all-business” operation run by the Tracy family.

    As Thunderbirds Are Go gets underway, we find the first manned space flight to Mars, on the interstellar ship Zero-X, which is being made ready for departure. Unfortunately, as Zero-X is undergoing its lengthy assembly for the journey to the red planet, which is not red in this film (for some reason beyond me), a saboteur (“The Hood” from the TV series ?) sneaks aboard, with the aim of derailing the mission. Once the ship is in flight, this bumbling saboteur gets his boot caught in a vital system component. Although he is able to wriggle his foot out, his boot remains lodged in the machine, which causes Zero-X to have a catastrophic failure and crash into the ocean.

    Luckily, the crew of Zero-X was able to eject, but after this disastrous end to their mission, a round table meeting is called to discuss the future of the Mars exploration program. As a result of this meeting, it is decided that the International Rescue team will preside over the next mission to Mars, to ensure it goes off without a hitch. After two years pass, the second mission is ready to proceed, with International Rescue in charge of security as planned.

    Shortly, obtaining the services of International Rescue proves to have been a wise move, as they had the foresight to send their glamorous associate, Lady Penelope, undercover as a journalist. Through her efforts, the saboteur’s attempt to creep on board the new Zero X spacecraft is foiled, and he is unmasked in a moment of wonderful melodrama! This development paves the way for a successful trip to Mars, where the crew encounter some unfriendly “life as we don’t know it” [​IMG] . This is only beginning of the drama though, as Zero X malfunctions during re-entry into Earth’s atmosphere, leaving the astronauts trapped on a doomed ship. Sounds like a rescue job fit for the “Thunderbirds”!

    Even though I cannot call myself a Thunderbirds aficionado, I do know that this film does not quite live up to the few television episodes I have seen over the years. Still, Thunderbirds Are Go is delightful, family friendly fun, and a good example of why these characters have remained popular for so many years. I also cannot say enough about the outstanding score by Barry Gray, especially the classic Zero-X and main themes! Indeed, I still cannot stop humming some of the rousing melodies – even though days have passed since I first started watching these films!

    And although the writing may not be as strong, the production values for the Thunderbirds films are much greater. According to those involved in their creation, the larger budgets helped give rise to all manner of creative possibilities, including allowing visual effects director Derek Meddings to hand pick a team of talented artists and special effects folks capable of pulling off the myriad of eye-popping effects in the two films. Thanks to his efforts, and attention to detail, Thunderbirds Are Go is replete with explosions and other visual effects that look downright amazing for being 40-plus years old!

    In addition, the intricate work of the puppet makers and operators has to be seen to be fully appreciated – mere words cannot do such efforts justice. To use a term made popular by this series, these marionettes look absolutely F-A-B! I can scarcely imagine how much work went into disguising the strings, which are nearly invisible in both Thunderbirds films, and how much care and effort it took to make these little wooden characters seem so life-like.

    Unfortunately, the movie-going public did not show their appreciation for all of this hard work with their wallets, since the movie did nowhere near the business expected. The Thunderbirds would not go down without a fight, however, and two years later came…


    THUNDERBIRD 6
    Rated: G
    Running Time: 89 Minutes

    Despite the dismal box office take of Thunderbirds Are Go, United Artists scraped together the cash to fund a follow-up feature, titled Thunderbird 6, which hit theaters in 1968. Set in the year 2068, Thunderbird 6 has a coherent and engaging plot, reliant much more on espionage and story elements than the copious explosions and action adventure theme that prevailed in Thunderbirds Are Go. The main new theme is a new “Thunderbird 6” ship, which engineer Brains is in the process of creating for the Tracy family.

    As the story gets going, Lady Penelope, Alan and Tin-Tin (Christine Finn) have been invited aboard a revolutionary new airship, dubbed Skyship One, in celebration of its inaugural flight. Unfortunately for our heroic trio, and Penelope’s trusty old butler Parker, they board the ship completely unaware that the crew has been liquidated and replaced by the agents of the evil “Black Phantom”, who plans to rid the world of International Rescue! This sinister new crew is tasked with recording Lady Penelope’s voice, in order to cut-and-paste together bogus communications that will lure the Thunderbirds into an ambush at an abandoned airstrip.

    Like the first film (perhaps more so) it is full of fun and good, family friendly humor –a good portion of which is provided by Lady Penelope and Parker! Overall, the storyline is much stronger than the one for Thunderbirds Are Go, though there is a little less in the way of special effects, explosions and the Tracy clan’s famous nail-biting rescues. Instead, in this film, some of the supporting characters step into larger roles, namely Parker and Brains, both of whom are excellent in the film. Indeed, we see the creative genius Brains providing some comic relief through his frustration and sarcasm, after Jeff Tracy shoots down several of his ideas for the Thunderbird 6 ship.

    In yet another departure from the series’ previous installments, we see puppets being shot and killed, not just “stunned”, as was the case in all of the other installments of series I have seen. This occurs during a lengthy gun battle in Skyship One’s anti-gravity control center, at which point (in the audio commentary) Sylvia Anderson talks about the depiction of shootings in this film being darker and more violent than what the series had done in the past.

    It is also worth mentioning that the production values on Thunderbird 6 are even greater than Thunderbirds Are Go, obviously an effort by all those involved to one-up themselves. As one might expect, the models and set design are unbelievably intricate, colorful, and life-like. Additionally, the crew re-created huge locations, like the magnificent pyramids of Egypt, and the Grand Canyon in the Southwestern United States, which look nothing less than F-A-B!

    Really though, Thunderbird 6 is Lady Penelope’s film – which Sylvia Anderson states evolved out of the huge success of the James Bond films. Also, the storyline, and many of the sets, have a distinctly “007” feel to them. Opinions will vary of course, but I thought putting her center stage was a great move, as Penelope and Parker were easily the most entertaining of the International Rescue characters (to me). As such, I found Thunderbird 6 to be a more likeable film than Thunderbirds Are Go.

    However, despite its many differences from Thunderbirds Are Go, as a film Thunderbird 6 has a few of the same minor flaws that kept the first feature from being great. Essentially, the story is not quite as grand as the production values, making the movie seem like an overlong episode of the television program. For my money, Thunderbird 6 is the better film though, and the final sequence exhibits the tension and excitement that were trademarks of the series (the episodes I have seen, anyway).

    Unfortunately, despite what I consider to be improvements, Thunderbird 6 also under-performed at the box office, grounding any plans for future feature films featuring the International Rescue team. Ironically, given its immense popularity in countries like Australia (mentioned by Sylvia Anderson in the supplemental material), it is highly likely that these films have been profitable through video releases during the intervening years. I suppose that even more interest will be generated in these feature films once the live-action remake starring Bill Paxton, which is due to hit theaters soon, debuts.






    SO, HOW DOES IT LOOK?
    To achieve the desired look for the special effects, both Thunderbirds Are Go! and Thunderbird 6 were filmed in the Techniscope “Supermarionation” [​IMG] format, as opposed to using the anamorphic Panavison equipment available at the time. Apparently, the Panavision cameras of the time were incapable of yielding the depth the filmmakers were looking for.

    According to David Lane, Techniscope is the equivalent of approximately one-half of a 35-millimeter frame, which is subsequently processed and transferred to 35-millimeter for distribution and theatrical exhibitions. For people who don’t fully understand this stuff (yours truly included), let’s just say that despite the extra steps that the Techniscope process entails, both of these films look great on DVD!!!

    To begin with, colors are rendered in a bold, lustrous manner in both films, but particularly in Thunderbird 6, where Lady Penelope’s costumes, her stately home, and the majestic “location sets” take center stage. Moreover, colors are almost completely free of any noticeable distractions, like dot crawl. Blacks are also deep and noise-free, which leads to good shadow delineation and image depth. Better still, compression artifacts, edge enhancement, and aliasing are present only in minimal quantities, and were never a source of distraction.

    Additionally, with the exception of a moderate amount of grain that is visible in darker shots, the image is always very sharp, which brings out the most minute details in the ships, sets, costumes, and – of course – the wonderful puppets! To be sure, Thunderbirds Are Go is slightly worse for wear than its follow-up, as it a touch darker, and not quite as clean or sharp. Still, its image quality issues are also very minor, and definitely not nearly as bad as one would expect from such an “old” film.

    To sum things up, though the source material probably had its limitations, these transfers really bring home the rich, vibrant colors and wonderful detail of these visually appealing films! I don’t think I would be going out on a limb in saying that these films have probably never looked better!





    WHAT IS THAT NOISE?
    MGM has done two really great things with the audio tracks for both of these Thunderbirds films. First, both films feature wonderful re-mixes from the original monaural source to 5.1 channel surround. Secondly, MGM has given viewers an array of audio options – DD, DTS (oh yeah!), and even the original monaural tracks are all on hand!!! Bravo to MGM for giving viewers so many options!!!

    More importantly, the soundtracks for both films sound much more smooth and dynamic than I was expecting from remixes of old monaural material! The terrific compositions by Barry Gray sound particularly nice, especially the main theme, although the score is a bit brighter and less crisp on Thunderbirds Are Go.

    On both films, however, dialogue and sound effects are reproduced in a clean, precise manner normally not akin to films from the 1960s. Derek Meddings’ many pyrotechnics also put the subwoofer through its paces in both films, particularly at the conclusion of Thunderbird 6, and the sub also lends a little bit of support to the score and some of the other sound effects in the film, like jet engines.

    The surround channels, on the other hand, are used more sparingly, mostly for reverberation effects, to embellish the score, and to generate ambient noise. On a few occasions, however, the surround channels are used to great effect – particularly during the shootout between Lady Penelope and “Black Phantom’s” goons in Thunderbird 6! Impressively, while these surround effects don’t sound as natural as those in the native 5.1 mixes of today, they do not sound too “gimmicky”.

    Overall, I must admit there is no mistaking that these are artificially created surround mixes, but considering that they are remixes, and their age, one could not ask for too much more! The bottom line is that they are very nicely done soundtracks that invigorate the source material, and I think fans will be very pleased. And with so many different audio alternatives, there is something for everyone – even purists! [​IMG] [​IMG]




    EXTRAS, EXTRAS!!!


    THUNDERBIRDS ARE GO

    Feature Length Audio Commentary
    The feature-length audio commentary for Thunderbirds Are Go, which is very well worth listening to, is provided by producer Sylvia Anderson (also the voice of Lady Penelope) and director David Lane. In this insightful, entertaining commentary, these two cough up a wealth of information about the making of the first Thunderbirds feature film! For me, highlights included:

    --- A discussion about composer Barry Gray and the 70 piece orchestra at his command, and how the score was used to create the emotions the puppets could not.

    --- An overview of why the film was shot in “Techniscope”, as opposed to being filmed with Panavision equipment.

    --- Sylvia Anderson revealing the inspiration for the Tracy family, that they were named after famous astronauts of the time, and who the looks of some characters were based upon.

    --- How the Martian “rock snakes” were developed during the storyboarding process.

    If you have any interest in this series, I am confident you will find plenty of highlights of your own! A very good commentary track!!!


    History and Appeal
    In “History and Appeal” (10:25), historian Richard Holliss, producer Sylvia Anderson, and director David Lane talk about the origins of the Tracy family (inspired by the Bonanza TV series, and the push United Artists made to make the Thunderbirds feature films. Among other things, the trio also discusses the sheer popularity of the short-lived TV series, the ingenuity and diligence that the artists working on the film displayed, and why the Thunderbirds appealed to both males and females.

    Though somewhat brief, this is a very fun and informative featurette, punctuated by the enthusiasm of all three participants. Well done!


    Factory of Dolls and Rockets
    In this featurette, which runs for 8 minutes and 40 seconds, Sylvia Anderson talks about assembling the “family” of artisans that gave life to the puppets, David Lane comments on Gerry Anderson’s term “Supermarionation”, and puppeteer Mary Turner reveals some of the techniques employed to make the characters seem more true-to-life. Subsequently, Richard Holliss talks about how the filmmakers coped with the fact that the puppets could not walk very well, namely by utilizing creative ways to move them around the sets.


    Epics In Miniature
    “Epics” is a wonderful featurette that consists of archival photos and interviews with David Lane, Richard Holliss, and Sylvia Anderson, who talk about transitioning the Thunderbirds from television to the silver screen, and all it entailed. Specifically, there is a detailed chat about how the special effects necessitated the use of non-anamorphic cameras and the Techniscope process.

    All three persons also talk about the immense contributions made by visual effects director Derek Medding, who used everything under the sun – “wind-backs”, high-speed photography, and small apertures – to create some truly amazing special effects.

    Finally, the participants reminisce about the rousing, march-like score created by Barry Gray, and how this music was used to overcome the fact that the puppets were limited to a single facial expression. Just like the other featurettes, this one is well worth a look if you have any interest in the Thunderbirds!


    “Who Said That?” Quiz
    Upon selecting this interactive quiz, players will hear a quote from a character in the film, and must match the quote to the character that said it. If you get them all right, you will be treated to a very short video clip featuring Sylvia Anderson, who explains the development of the term F-A-B!


    Easter Egg
    I located one Easter egg, which is an amusing anecdote from Sylvia Anderson. It can be found by highlighting “scenes” on the main menu and press down



    Animated Photo Gallery
    A total of 50 still photographs (color and black-and-white) play over music.


    Theatrical Trailer and Promotional Material
    The faded, gritty theatrical trailer for Thunderbirds Are Go, which runs approximately 1 ½ minutes, has been included. Promotional materials include:

    --- The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly: Special Edition
    --- The Great Escape: Special Edition
    --- Jeremiah TV Series DVD Set
    --- Cover Art for 6 more MGM “Special Edition” releases, including Die Another Day, To Live and Die in L.A., and Jeepers Creepers 2, among others.


    THUNDERBIRD 6

    Feature Length Audio Commentary
    A fantastic feature-length commentary for Thunderbird 6 is provided by producer Sylvia Anderson and director David Lane. In this insightful, enjoyable commentary, the duo offers a wide variety of facts and behind-the-scenes information about the making of both this film and the television series it was based on. Highlights included:

    --- The differences in set direction between the films (and an interesting story about burning ping pong balls).

    --- Discussions about how miniatures were blended with real backgrounds to create a greater sense of realism.

    --- Sylvia Anderson talking about the development of a more sophisticated Lady Penelope character.

    --- A discussion about the skillful flying done for the film by pilot Joan Hughes, and a funny story about the trouble it landed the filmmakers in.

    Simply put, this is a very good audio commentary. Entertaining and informative, it was an easy listen, and should be well worth the investment of time for those with a fondness for the Thunderbirds. Even though I cannot say I am a hardcore fan, the enthusiasm of Mr. Lane and Ms. Anderson was infectious, and I found myself listening much more intently to what the two artists had to say as the movie ran its course! [​IMG] [​IMG]


    Lady Penelope
    “Lady Penelope” is a nice ten-minute featurette that delves into a variety of topics related to the character and her development. Topics covered (by bonus materials mainstays Richard Holliss, David Lane, and Sylvia Anderson) included: how Lady Penelope was inspired by the Bond films, and more rooted in reality than the other characters; how the inclusion of Lady Penelope and Parker helped the feature films retain the same quirky “British feel” of the TV show; and a chat about working with Rolls Royce to receive approval for certain aspects of Fab 1’s design. Puppet coordinator Mary Turner also contributes to the piece by chatting about the level of detail that went into Lady Penelope’s costumes and hairstyles.


    Building Better Puppets
    This interesting extra, which runs 8 minutes, features Sylvia Anderson and Mary Turner discussing the careful process of modeling grander and more detailed puppets for the big screen, as they would be exposed to greater scrutiny. They also talk about how the marionettes’ wires were painted to make them blend in with backgrounds, and some of the inventive techniques they used to make it easier for the puppeteers to operate the characters from the overhead bridge they used. Finally, director David Lane discusses some of the clever ways the puppets were moved around the sets, since the puppets themselves did not move very well.


    Tiger Moth
    The “Tiger Moth” featurette, which runs a little over six minutes, is similar to the other extras, in that it contains interviews with Richard Holliss, Sylvia Anderson, and David Lane. Among other things, the participants reminisce about how Thunderbird 6 was a more “talky” film than Thunderbirds Are Go, how the scenes featuring the Tiger Moth bi-plane were a blend of live action and miniature work, and the amazing flying skill of Joan Hughes, who flew the real Tiger Moth.


    “Craft Mission Match-Up” Quiz
    In this interactive quiz, players must match each “Thunderbird” to their corresponding ship. Winning the game will treat the player to a very short excerpt from an interview with Sylvia Anderson, where she discusses the Lady Penelope character.


    Animated Photo Gallery
    A total of 48 still photos (color and black-and-white) play over music.


    Easter Egg
    As was the case with the Thunderbirds Are Go disc, Thunderbird 6 appears to contain one Easter egg, which again leads to a clip featuring Sylvia Anderson talking about a blown lunch date with Stanley Kubrick. It can be found by highlighting “languages” on the main menu and pressing up



    Theatrical Trailer and Promotional Materials
    The grainy and slightly dark two-minute theatrical trailer for Thunderbirds 6 is included.

    Promotional materials include:

    --- The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly: Special Edition
    --- The Great Escape: Special Edition
    --- Jeremiah TV Series DVD Set
    --- Cover Art for 6 more MGM “Special Edition” releases, including Die Another Day, To Live and Die in L.A., and Jeepers Creepers 2, among others.


    Packaging
    The “International Rescue Edition” two-pack comes with a neat cardboard slipcover that has a detachable panel, which contains cardboard cutouts of each of the Thunderbird ships. There is also a sheet containing magnetic renderings of the characters, their ships, and popular sayings from the films! Not a deal-maker for me, but I think that fans may find it enticing to be able to adorn their refrigerators or desks with Thunderbirds trinkets!



    SCORE CARD

    (on a five-point scale)
    Movie: [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Video: [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG][​IMG]
    Audio: [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Extras: [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Overall: [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG][​IMG]



    THE LAST WORD
    While they may not be the most memorable adventures of the International Rescue Team, Lady Penelope, and company, Thunderbirds Are Go and Thunderbird 6 are fun films made by very passionate and creative people. In both films, the puppets, sets, and special effects are first rate, with the sheer ambition of these projects offset the writing enough for me to enjoy them, particularly Thunderbird 6!

    If you were hoping that MGM would deliver a quality package for these films, then rest assured – for the Thunderbirds are indeed “go”! Specifically, a bevy of bonus features, cool collectible packaging, better than expected image quality, and well executed 5.1 channel remixes (including DTS sound!) make this set a must-own for fans! Of course, as always, those who are completely unfamiliar with the Thunderbirds might want to rent or borrow before buying.


    Stay tuned…
     
  2. Randy Korstick

    Randy Korstick Producer

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    Great detailed review Jason.
    I'm looking forward to this set alot, wish I could say the same for the new movie coming out. Glad to hear the films look and sound better than ever.
     
  3. Ed St. Clair

    Ed St. Clair Producer

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    F.A.B.
     
  4. TonyD

    TonyD Who do we think I am?
    Supporter

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    heh. what did that stand for anyway?
     
  5. Jonathan Kaye

    Jonathan Kaye Second Unit

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    For which read "a speedy metal/blue rocketship".[​IMG]
     
  6. John Whittle

    John Whittle Stunt Coordinator

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    In "Thunderbirds Are Go" special features, the "History" short breaks up and freezes toward the end (when the pink Rolls is speeding to jump into the water). Any one else have a problem? (on second try after cleaning the disc it started to break up earlier on the shot of the director.)

    Also in the press conference (and this must be on all discs) it looks like the split screen effects were not put together right and there is a laps with a pink half of frame until the Astronaut is brought up and then at the end Penny drops out and it goes pink before the end of the scene.

    (I've also forgotten what FAB stood for).

    John
     
  7. Jonathan Kaye

    Jonathan Kaye Second Unit

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    F.A.B. does not stand for anything at all. It was made up on the spur of the moment and means nothing other than spelling out the letters of "fab" (as in "fabulous").
     
  8. Chucky P

    Chucky P Supporting Actor

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    I was wondering if the songs performed by The Shadows during the dream sequence (Shooting Star & The Lady Penelope Instrumental) were available on CD. You would think they would appear on this album since the cover comes from the movie but they are not on there so I was wondering if anybody knows if these songs are available anywhere.

    Thanks

    Also those interested in Barry Gray's music can check this site out http://www.ufoseries.com/barry/ .
     
  9. Jonathan Kaye

    Jonathan Kaye Second Unit

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    There was a CD release in the UK over a decade ago of the "Thunderbirds Are Go" soundtrack, which includes tracks from the "Cliff Richard & The Shadows 'Thunderbirds' EP". Track listing is here.

    Here's the cover:
    [​IMG]
     
  10. Chucky P

    Chucky P Supporting Actor

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    Thanks Jonathan!
    If this was still available I would buy in it a heartbeat!
     

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