HT room acoustics

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by Wayde_R, Sep 3, 2003.

  1. Wayde_R

    Wayde_R Stunt Coordinator

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    I understand how using dampening materials (IE soundproof paneling) can help the acoustics in a smaller room (18X12). But my question is, do you try to dampen the sound in a larger room (25X25) as well? Are there acoustic benifits to this?

    Has anyone tried those sound proof panels? Do they do a good job? Or is there some price range they have to be before they work.

    Not sure this is the right forum to ask questions about an HT room's design my last post here was removed but it's a very imporant question for me as I plan an HT room. I don't know of another forum to ask this type of question in.
     
  2. Frank Zimkas

    Frank Zimkas Supporting Actor

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    Almost any HT or listening room can benefit from some form of acoustic enhancement. Pre made panels to absorb sound can help, but DIY panels can be just as effective for a fraction of the cost. Are there any particular problems you are trying to cure? A simple method to gauge the need for panels of some type is to clap your hands in your HT and listen for any echo. Sounds really basic, and it realy is! There are a lot of ways to measure the room acoustics, some cheap, others not so cheap. Try to give us as much info about your room (including flooring, furniture, & construction) as posible and you will be flooded with advice.
     
  3. Wayde_R

    Wayde_R Stunt Coordinator

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    Hi, that's a great test very practical.

    I am currently shopping for a house and HT is a consideration for me. I'd obviously like as large a room as possible but it seems universal that it will be in the basement. Basement will have to include carpeting, the walls might be concrete, drywall, wooden panels or other reflective materials.

    So, is echo a "bad" thing? I imagine that it is because it will promote a 'brighter' sound. But I'm curious what the experts think.

    My DIY HT room won't be anything special, more of a second family room with seating aimed at the TV. But when I look at houses, HT potential is definitely a consideration. Any advice on what to look for in a potential HT room would be appreciated too.

    Thanks
    Wayde
     
  4. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    Actually, you would have to have a very large room to get a “real” echo, because it would require some time delay. You can’t get that delay from a small room.

    Reverberation caused by reflections – that’s another question. What you want is a mid-point between the overly “live” sound you would have with hard surfaces everywhere, and the “dead” sound of say, a studio. Wall-to-wall carpet is a good start. Heavy draperies applied to windows would another “room friendly” treatment. If not, acoustic panels made from an absorptive material will help, as Frank noted.

    The get a better idea of how “live” vs. “dead” sounds, compare the clap test in one of the empty houses you look at to say, a walk-in closet filled with hanging clothing.

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     

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