HT newbie with many questions

Discussion in 'Playback Devices' started by Rick*S, Dec 30, 2004.

  1. Rick*S

    Rick*S Auditioning

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    Hello Forum Members,

    I am absolutely new to HT. So I have a few questions.
    I have a budget of about 800-1000 dollars to spend on a HT system (6.1 or 5.1) right now. I would like this system to be upgradeable. I have about 400 s.f.(18'x22') to fill with sound. I also have an 1999 43" Sony rear projection TV, replaceable in next 15 months.

    1. Is it better to buy components separately,(AV receiver,DVD player, speakers) or purchase a HTIB?
    2. Are there very good integrated (receiver, amp, DVD, all-in-one) components out there? Should I stay away from this?
    3. If I go the individual component route, what are the best components I can get for 800-1000 dollars? System or component recommendations would be welcome. There are just so many choices.

    I've read so much on-line literature on how to buy, that I think I could make a pretty informed decision. The problem is that I have little or no knowledge of audio electronics. I'm really trying to get get the "best bang for the buck" here.

    Thanks to all who took their time to read this.
     
  2. Tim K

    Tim K Second Unit

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    Most people will recommend buying individual components over an HTIB. Also, most people avoid buying all-in-one units. If your receiver and DVD player are in the same unit...what happens if one part of the unit breaks? You've got to replace the whole unit.

    I'd get a seperate receiver and dvd player, then find a nice budget speaker system.
     
  3. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

    Moderator

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    There are some pre-packaged HTIB’s that actually have separate components. I think Onkyo has some that are pretty highly regarded as far as HTIB’s go

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  4. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Since you're also asking for specific-model recommendations for a complete system, your thread has been relocated to A/V Sources (which is where complete-system discussions presently are located). The Basics area is strictly for general discussion at the beginner level. Thank you. JB
     
  5. EricRWem

    EricRWem Screenwriter

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    Onkyo 770 or 870 HTIB. [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  6. ChuckSolo

    ChuckSolo Screenwriter

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    Rick, keep in mind that there are different flavors of HTiBs. These are:

    1. All inclusive with the DVD player and receiver/amp all in one unit = not too good if you want to add devices to it.

    2. Power amp/receiver and speakers/subwoofer with NO DVD player = better, because you can choose your own DVD player and can usually connect other components to it.

    3. Power amp/receiver and speakers/subwoofer with separate DVD player = Not bad, but you are basically stuck with whatever DVD player they give you in the box. This is also usually expandable with other components.

    I actually bought and returned a couple of these HTiBs in favor of separate components bought individually because with most HTiBs, some of the components in the box are usually mediocre at best....unless it is really a high end HTiB. High end usually equals pricey. Also I liked separates because they give you the ability to customize. For instance I wanted SACD/DVD-Audio playback so I had to make sure I got a power amp with the 6 analog direct channel inputs as well as a DVD player with the 6 channel analog outputs. Now I am not saying that this is the best route to go since everyone has different budgets, but with your budget, you should be able to get a decent setup going with separates rather than a HTiB. Shop around and you will be surprised to see what is available within your budget. I also agree that Onkyo HTiBs are nice, especially the ones without the DVD player included. Sony makes a good series of HTiBs although I would stay away from the models that have the amp/receiver and DVD player in one unit.[​IMG]
     
  7. EricRWem

    EricRWem Screenwriter

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    Certainly. If you CAN get into seperates, I always recommend that first. You'd actually be surprised what you can do within affordable means. If you're in a hurry, or you really want to just kill it in one fell, simple swoop, then we're back to HTIB's like what I recommended.

    Onkyo 770 and 870 come without the DVD player. 777 and 877 come with DVD player, FYI.
     
  8. Jim Mcc

    Jim Mcc Producer

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    Rick, you're pretty close to me, I'm in Oconomowoc.
    You should go the separate's route. I put together a nice sounding, 6.1 system for about $400.00. This includes JVC 6.1 receiver, 6 KLH speakers, Sony subwoofer, plus $70 for DVD player. I didn't need an expensive DVD player because my projector has the excellent Faroudja de-interlacer inside. I'm using it with my X1 projector and HD satellite and it sounds great. The best part is you get to hear everything before you buy.
     
  9. AdamSZ

    AdamSZ Auditioning

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    ive been looking at new HT's today, and from the people i talked too, and all the reviews ive read, it seems the best to buy if youre on a budget would be the onkyo ht-s770. you can pick one up for about $500, and i guess the only real problems are the speaker wire that comes with it(upgrade to monster or better anyway, who likes that crummy 18 guage speakerwire?), and the front speaker sizes(i love everyone who thinks the Bose way, you know, smaller is better... [​IMG] ). ill be picking one up soon, as soon as i pay off all these christmas bills. it doesnt come with a dvd player though, but dvd players are cheap now days anyway.
     
  10. DanielKellmii

    DanielKellmii Supporting Actor

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    Rick, I was in the same situation as you were a year ago. I ended up buying the Onkyo-760. I am very happy now. When I bought it, it was less than $500. So I had a smaller budget than you have. I am very happy with it now. I don't think I could have done much better for my budget. Here is what I have learned since then:
    Check with wife/girlfriend to avoid any conflicts over speaker size and color.
    Little plastic boxes that pretend to be subwoffers are fine until you hear a real sub. For the most part, a sub with a plastic box will be weak. You will get the sound, but it won't really shake your couch. If I lived in an apartment, I would have a little plastic box so I wouldn't disturb my neighbors.
    Radio Shack makes some good speaker wire for a lot less than monster. (Let's not turn this into a wire discussion please.)

    Keep everything after you buy it. Try it out at home and don't be afraid to return it.
    Good luck. Let us know how it turns out.
     
  11. AdamSZ

    AdamSZ Auditioning

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    dont mean to jack the thread, but i noticed that its recommended that the rear center speaker (on 6.1 systems) is about 2-3 feet behind the couch... why is that?
     
  12. EricRWem

    EricRWem Screenwriter

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    Simple. You need to give that speaker SOME kind of space to distribute its sound out. 2-3 feet is the recommended MINIMUM distance. Obviously, YMMV depending on your room, the speakers in question, etc.

    And ideally, you want it directly behind you for...well, the obvious reason: It's a rear CENTER channel. [​IMG]
     

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