HT Creation regarding track homes

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by JohanD, Aug 8, 2003.

  1. JohanD

    JohanD Stunt Coordinator

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    I may be in the market for a new home..

    With track homes.. usually the design is less flexible than if you are building yourself..

    What type of options do I have if I want an internal room built with some type of sound proofing? Has anyone done this before?

    I may just use the garage and build my own.. If I do go the garage route.. how important is sound proofing with regards to sound quality? (or is it just to not annoy the neighbors)
     
  2. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    I'm not sure what you mean by track housing?

    I'm having a home built and my builder contracts with an installation company for stuff like this. I'm not concerned with soundproofing the HT room though. I'm just having a media room made up, not a full on home theater.
     
  3. Ted Drain

    Ted Drain Agent

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    It will depend completely on the builder and how flexible they want to be. Some builders will be very flexible and some won't budge an inch.

    We're moving in to a semi-custom home in 2 weeks. We didn't want a full home theater room but I do like it quiet in the house so I wanted all the interior walls and floor-ceiling interfaces insulated. This wasn't one of the available options from our builder (though I have seen it listed as an option from some builders) so we submitted a request for cost to the builder. Came back at $1500 (for a 3300 sq ft house) so we got that feature. After dry wall was up, we walked through our house and some of the neighbors you and you could tell a huge difference just in the echo's from your own footsteps and voice.

    I'm sure the builder just called up the insulation contractor and asked for a price (and added some profit on the top of course). A fully sound proofed room might be a bigger step though since that involves adding a lot of structure to a room - assuming you're talking about isolated walls and ceilings.
     
  4. adamKI

    adamKI Stunt Coordinator

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    Customization varies greatly from builder to builder so you'll have to ask. It'll probably be cheaper than remodeling an existing home - so take that into account.

     
  5. JohanD

    JohanD Stunt Coordinator

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    She's got HUGE tracts o' land!
    Yes that type of tract [​IMG] Not track, sorry for my mistake.

    I'll look into the insulation. $1500 isn't too much for the entire house, and that could be an attractive upgrade. This would also diminish vaccum noise, TV noise etc.

    I don't necessaryly need sound proof.. but If I put a system with a tempest or tumult in a room.. I don't want to blast out the rest of the house or the neighbors if I crank it up loud..

    Perhaps if I add extra insulation throughout the house as suggested.. and then in the room with the HT just add a little more material to the walls etc.. maybe that could be effective?
     
  6. Rich Stone

    Rich Stone Stunt Coordinator

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    We are closing on a "cookie-cutter" or "tract" home later this month. I will be using the bonus room above the garage which is adjacent to several other upstairs bedrooms. We just asked the builder if we could come in on a weekend and insulate the interior walls. They told us the timeframe (after the electrical and exterior insulation inspections) and we spent a day doing it. Much less expensive and I was able to add extra insulation where I needed it. Just keep an eye on the sheetrock contractors, they have a tendency to knock insulation down. We also paid the builder to insulate between the upstairs and downstairs - I just didn't have time to do it myself.

    The results? I'll have a better feel when we move in - but I can hardly hear things in other rooms (with the doors closed) even with bare floors. For additional soundproofing I'd recommend acoustical caulking which you can also do yourself. For more structural isolation I guess you'd have to bring it up with the builder. For a tract house you might have difficulty with major changes....

    Rich
     
  7. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    If you're serious about having an awesome home theater and money is not a major object, the best way to go in a tract home would be to have a large unfinished part of the basement to work with later.

    I'm having a house built like this and my builder works with a local company for low-voltage wiring, including coax for HDTV/Cable/Satellite, phone, Cat5, and speaker cabling. They're going to install wiring and speakers for me in part of my rec room, and install a conduit for a projector. I'm not so concerned about soundproofing in the house.
     
  8. Wes

    Wes Screenwriter

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    I think the Garage thing would be a mistake! A unfinished basement would definitely be the way to go and you could build the theater for all for a lot less then the builder and do it your way. Look at many models before you buy, one is bound to have a suitable space in the basement.

    Wes
     
  9. JohanD

    JohanD Stunt Coordinator

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    Well.. I'm out in CA and none of the models have basements!!

    Garage looks like most likely placement.. unless we can get one with a nice sized gameroom
     

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