How would this work/What do i need

Discussion in 'Computers' started by Loreni, Mar 8, 2004.

  1. Loreni

    Loreni Extra

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    Hello.
    I have a future plan but im not quite sure how would this work.I found all my media entertainment on a PC.But this media is not so fun without a real HT system.
    So i would like to connect a HT[described below] on a PC.The PC will be used for games,DVDs and music.I heard there are limitations if connecting it via SPDIF so i wonder if i could connect it analog[like multimedia speakers are].

    The second question is about my future HT.How would this work together and how good idea is it.Since i cant post links,go to manufacturers website for specs.Its specially ohms im not sure about.Its a 5.1 system:
    Monitoraudio->GR20[four of them]
    Monitoraudio->GR Centre
    SVS->B4-plus subwoofer
    SVS->Crown K2 amp
     
  2. Max Leung

    Max Leung Producer

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    To address the PC side of things, you can use SP/DIF for watching movies and for music, as you can pass the audio data digitally without loss. Gaming, however, is another issue. Unless you have a motherboard with the NVIDIA nForce Soundstorm chipset (limiting you to the AMD CPUs), you will not have true 5.1 surround sound support in games. You will then need an HT receiver that can accept at least 6 analog inputs, which of course means more wires.

    Alternately, you can play video games on a console that supports digital surround sound, like an XBox or on a Playstation 2 (5.1 supported in a handful of games only).

    On the video side, things can get complicated. For the best video quality you should have a television that can accept VGA or DVI input. Component video inputs can be used if the video card is connected to a special transcoder device (or has one built-in, such as some of the newest ATI All-In-Wonder Radeon cards), although in general I find component video rather blurry at resolutions higher than 720x480 or 960x540 progressive scan.

    Oh boy. There are so many things you can do with an HTPC and so many options that there is no way for me to describe it all.
     
  3. Loreni

    Loreni Extra

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    "To address the PC side of things, you can use SP/DIF for watching movies and for music, as you can pass the audio data digitally without loss. Gaming, however, is another issue. Unless you have a motherboard with the NVIDIA nForce Soundstorm chipset (limiting you to the AMD CPUs), you will not have true 5.1 surround sound support in games. You will then need an HT receiver that can accept at least 6 analog inputs, which of course means more wires."
    Fortunately I have the Soundstorm and i like AMD CPUs.I will buy this tipe of receiver-i want to have everything on a PC.So this connection will be like the one MM speakers are using right?More wires?I already have them too much [​IMG]
    If i do that->which DAC will be used?

    Alternately, you can play video games on a console that supports digital surround sound, like an XBox or on a Playstation 2 (5.1 supported in a handful of games only).
    I could do that but i want PC games.


    "On the video side, things can get complicated. For the best video quality you should have a television that can accept VGA or DVI input. Component video inputs can be used if the video card is connected to a special transcoder device (or has one built-in, such as some of the newest ATI All-In-Wonder Radeon cards), although in general I find component video rather blurry at resolutions higher than 720x480 or 960x540 progressive scan"
    I wasnt asking about the video but you gave me some interesting info.So this TV that accepts VGA or DVI should be digital TV or is it possible to be analog aswell?
    Ill will check if they sell this tipe of TVs in our country.My 19inch Samsung looks small if watching it away.

    "Oh boy. There are so many things you can do with an HTPC and so many options that there is no way for me to describe it all. "
    I believe you but i just want to replace my Multi Media speakers with HT.
     
  4. Max Leung

    Max Leung Producer

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    Can you tell us what motherboard brand and model you are using? I just want to be sure your motherboard truly supports SoundStorm, or if it is using a different audio chip that happens to be labelled 5.1, but may actually be a low-quality chipset that cannot do real-time digital surround encoding.

    If your motherboard truly has SoundStorm (with the nForce audio control panel is present and lets you select Dolby Digital Surround encoding), you only need one cable to hook up to your HT receiver. Typically, the motherboard will have an RCA-style jack (aka coax) that outputs the digital audio. However, some may have the SP/DIF fiber optic output (typically in the European market). Most receivers should support both. Then you won't have to worry about analog cables for audio. [​IMG]
     
  5. Loreni

    Loreni Extra

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    THE MOTHERBOARD:
    Its Epox8RDA.Btw i would buy the right motherboard since i will spend [too] much money for the HT already.This isnt a problem.

    THE PROBLEM:
    Even if i do all that and I connect HT to SoundStorm i wont be able to play games.For games i would need my audigy2 being analogly connected to HT.If i understood you right this aint possible.I would really need a sound card for games->like audigy2 is.
    So another PC for games wouldnt be such a bad idea.And a good MM speakers[like Gigaworks] would be enough for games.So one PC with MM speakers and one with the HT.Damn is there really no way i could have all this on 1 PC?
     

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