How to use 12V Trigger?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Martin Rendall, Aug 22, 2002.

  1. Martin Rendall

    Martin Rendall Screenwriter

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    I would like to trigger my amp on and off when my receiver is turned on and off. The catch is that the receiver doesn't have a 12V output. So, what's the best way to solve this?

    The receiver does have a 120V receptacle or two, which I believe only supplies power when the receiver is on. I can build something if necessary, but I'd rather just get some off the shelf parts, stick 'em together, and forget about it.

    Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!

    Thanks,
    Martin.
     
  2. Kevin P

    Kevin P Screenwriter

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    You need to get an AC Adapter that outputs 12V DC to a miniplug. You can get one at Radio Shack. Plug the transformer into the switched outlet on your receiver and the miniplug into the trigger jack on your amp.

    KJP
     
  3. Martin Rendall

    Martin Rendall Screenwriter

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    Kevin,

    Any current issues? The trigger isn't well documented. Also, I believe the amp has screws, not a miniplug receptacle. I guess I can just cut and strip the AC Adapter wire.

    Thanks,
    Martin.
     
  4. Rick Guynn

    Rick Guynn Second Unit

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    I believe most trigger circuits only use about 5mA or around there... basically just enough to power a relay [​IMG]
    RG
     
  5. Martin Rendall

    Martin Rendall Screenwriter

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    So if I use an AC adapter which outputs 300mA or 500mA, there's no chance of, er, melting anything in my amp?

    Thanks,
    Martin.
     
  6. Roger Kint

    Roger Kint Stunt Coordinator

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  7. David Berry

    David Berry Stunt Coordinator

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    Martin,

    I was in the same situation with my Bryston 3B-ST and Denon 3802. My amp will take anything between 4 volts to 12 volts to trigger it. Anything above 3mA is enough current, according to James Tanner at Bryston. As it turned out, I had a 9V 300 mA AC to DC phone adapter lying around, so I cut off the end which left two wires. I removed about 1 cm of the insulation around the two wires and inserted them into the two screw receptacles on the back of the Bryston. I plugged the other end into the receiver's AC receptacle. Works as expected.
    The extra current supplied will not "fry" anything (it is at 9 volts, thus for me, the wattage input is P=IV=(0.3A)x(9V)=~3 watts of power). James Tanner also agrees that the extra current here will not harm the amp at all.

    David
     
  8. Martin Rendall

    Martin Rendall Screenwriter

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    Thank you all for the great answers! [​IMG] I feel confident enough to go ahead now!
    Martin.
     

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