How to test pre-wired setups?

Discussion in 'Beginners, General Questions' started by todd<>C, Jan 22, 2004.

  1. todd<>C

    todd<>C Extra

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    I live in an apartment that is wired for surround sound. One of the jacks works, but the other doesnt. I have changed the wire from the receiver to the wall and the wall to the speaker, tried different speakers and I also pluged the speaker into the wire that goes from the receiver to the wall into the speaker to see if i had it connected properly to the receiver and it worked. so this leads me to beleive there is a problem with the wiring in the walls. the apartment said it was on my end. how can i test to see if the wire inside the wall is carrying the signal besides what I have already done?
     
  2. Stephen Weller

    Stephen Weller Stunt Coordinator

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    You can physically access both ends, right?

    Twist the pair together at one end, and check at the other end with a multimeter. There should be a short or very near. To further isolate the problem, attach a long wire to each conductor in turn and measure with multimeter at the opposite end. Should still be at or near a short. One ohm is not excessive depending on the length.
     
  3. todd<>C

    todd<>C Extra

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    Yes i have access to both ends. Not sure I completly understand your statement "There should be a short or very near". I know what multimeters are, but I am not familiar with using them.
     
  4. Stephen Weller

    Stephen Weller Stunt Coordinator

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    Ummm...there should be very little resistance. If a speaker is (typically) 8 ohms, the wire should very close to 0 (zero) ohms. Actually, in this case, you probably only need to verify that the wires aren't broken. IOW - don't get hung up on the impedance. Just make sure they conduct.

    (Removed a stupid question. I just re-read the original post.)

    If you've never used a multimeter, you should probably enlist the assistance from someone who has one. We aren't all that rare. [​IMG]
     
  5. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    try this.

    1. connect the speaker to one end
    2. take a 1.5v battery (d, c, whatever) and connect it to the other end
    3. if the speaker moves, you know you have a good connection.

    this is also useful to verify which wire is positive/negative. if the polarity is correct, the speaker will "push out". if the polarity is reversed, the speaker will "suck in".
     
  6. Stephen Weller

    Stephen Weller Stunt Coordinator

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    Ted's suggestion will work. If you can't readily tell whether the cone is moving in or out, you *will* hear it click or thump.[rant]

    Thanks, Ted![/rant]
     

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