How to stop a barking dog

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Jeff Perry, Oct 6, 2003.

  1. Jeff Perry

    Jeff Perry Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2003
    Messages:
    89
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    My dog barks. Constantly. Does anyone have any tips on what I could do to get her to stop? Current methods include yelling at her and putting her in her kennel. Effective for that moment, totally ineffective otherwise, and I'm getting tired of it. I need advice on the best way to handle the situation.

    Here's the long story for those who care to read it:

    Dog is medium-small. Lives indoors, has free run of the house, and a dog flap to get outside into a little fenced dog run. Female, Welsh Corgi mix, a Cardigan I think, but could be Pembroke. Very cute and adorable and a really good dog other than the barking.

    Types of barking:

    1. Alarm barking: "WOOFWOOFWOOFWOOFWOOF!!!" Randomly, 24/7, several times an hour, dog will freak out and tear off to attack and eat "something". A car door can close two blocks away and she freaks. Same if someone comes to the door, or walks on the sidewalk, or rides by on a bike. She even does it if any neighbor within sight decides to work in their yard. She doesn't stop, either, she just keeps going and going and going until she's been yelled at eight times, or grabbed and put into her kennel. Especially annoying at 3 in the morning.

    2. Talking back: (under her breath): "Grrrr... woof... woof... grrrr...". Happens randomly when she thinks there might be something to bark at but isn't sure. Also happens every time we get her to stop her alarm barking. She wanders around with the scruff of her neck sticking up, growling and woofing quietly. If not addressed she will escalate back into alarm barking.

    3. Annoyance barking: This is your normal, typical dog barking. Like when we let her in the back yard to play and she runs back and forth along the fence barking at everyone who walks by on the sidewalk behind the house. Or when she just feels like barking (which is always).

    4. "I'm going to defend you" barking: We can't take her on a walk, or anywhere. If any person or other animal comes within 20 feet of us she freaks out. Barks like mad, tries to eat them, and won't stop no matter what we do or say to her. She'll pull on her leash so hard she can't breath and she'll still bark while gasping for air.

    Please help... I'm willing to take the time to work with her. She's a great dog. We've taught her all sorts of tricks. She's good with the kids. She's cute and fun to play with. But we don't know what to do with this barking.
     
  2. ColinM

    ColinM Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2001
    Messages:
    2,050
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Discipline, as in dog training, professional-type with you and the dog both. That's about it. I won't own a dog because I know I'll just have to listen to the wife bitch about it. You should hear her complain about the kitty's soft meow at 2AM.

    I hope it's not too late - I hear a dog gives a poop about you as master only if you assert yourself early in the relationship, and set definite acceptable behavior boundries and stick to them.

    Good Luck, I feel your pain.
     
  3. Jack Shappa

    Jack Shappa Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2003
    Messages:
    411
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Look on the bright side. Noone will EVER sneak into your place without you knowing about it. I had a little dog that was the cutest, lovingest thing ever, but those little house dogs do tend to "freak out". I suppose I would too if everything in the world were 10 times my size.

    You can get a lemon spray collar that squirts the dog in the nose when they bark (not painful, but they don't like it). Of course then the dog may stop barking altogether, and you may not want that. Obedience class can be effective too, but usually only when you're around.

    Whatever you do, don't have the dogs vocal chords removed, that's just cruel.

    - Cryo
     
  4. Scott L

    Scott L Producer

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2000
    Messages:
    4,457
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Have you tried putting one of those snout covers on her when you go for a walk? Sounds cruel but so is having to put up with that annoying sound, both you as the master and people just minding their own business.

    A big pet peeve of mine are dogs that consistently bark for no damn reason. I like my afternoon naps (and sleeping till 12pm for that matter)! How old is she btw?
     
  5. Walt N

    Walt N Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2001
    Messages:
    417
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    My Black Lab was a big time barker, very much as you describe. I had limited luck using one of those bark collars a few years ago, but there's a lot of training (for the owner) that goes with it and it can't be left on when the dog isn't supervised. It's definitely not a "plug and play" solution.

    Better results were obtained using a "shake can" (empty metal can with some pennies in it and taped up) to startle the dog from barking, and accompanied by a consistent verbal command. I use "no barking!". Stern, but I don't yell or do it angrily. She's pretty much under control now, a "no barking" gets the job done 95% of the time, but it has taken quite awhile since I wasn't as consistent with this training as I should have been. I am more consistent with it now, and the results show it.

    I adopted this dog along with another one when they were 2-3 years old and now they're around 7-8 years old. You CAN teach an old dog new tricks, and a high level of bonding can take place at anytime in a dogs life.

    There is a wealth of excellent information on the web for training dogs for this problem, and every other one. Search www.google.com and you'll find it.

    Good luck.
     
  6. Steve_Tk

    Steve_Tk Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2002
    Messages:
    2,833
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Sounds like the dog has not been socialized. Our family dog years ago was never around non-family members or other dogs, so the sight of those things set him off.

    Training could help because you would be around other people and dogs and they would start to feel more comfortable, therefore not barking at anything that moves.
     
  7. JayV

    JayV Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    May 30, 2002
    Messages:
    612
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Two suggestions:

    1. Go to classes with your dog.

    2. Frequent time outs of short duration. When she starts barking immediately tell her 'no' or 'uh-uh' and put her in her crate. Wait 30 seconds out of sight and then let her out.

    It's important to wait until she discontinues the continues the unwanted behavior. That is, wait until she stops barking even if it's longer than 30 seconds. She comes out as soon as the behavior stops. This is calculated to help the dog zero in on what you're tring to communicate.

    Keep doing it. It's a pain in the ass, and you'll find yourself getting up and giving her time outs one after the other. Very inconvenient early on, but she'll should soon understand what it is you're trying to communicate.

    I've heard all that stuff about teaching the dog who's boss, and it may work for a lot of people.

    It's been my experience, however, that more energy should be spent trying to communicate what you want with your dog. They're like people in that respect.

    I have no experience with shock collars.

    -j
     
  8. Walt N

    Walt N Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2001
    Messages:
    417
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  9. MarkHastings

    MarkHastings Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2003
    Messages:
    12,013
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I know many are going to have issues with this, but I know someone who trains animals and she uses a shock collar. It's not a painful shock, it's a "buzz" (kind of like the handheld gag-buzzers you put in the palm of your hand). It doesn't harm the dog, it just kind of spooks them.

    She uses it for all kinds of training of "Bad Behavior". Again, most people think it's cruel, but she doesn't use it all the time. You should try everything you can to discourage the behavior first before you use the 'shock' method.

    My friend claims this device works wonders and highly recomends it. She is an avid animal lover and doesn't condone cruelty at all, so if she thinks it's ok, it's got to be ok.
     
  10. Jeff Perry

    Jeff Perry Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2003
    Messages:
    89
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  11. MarkHastings

    MarkHastings Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2003
    Messages:
    12,013
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  12. JayV

    JayV Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    May 30, 2002
    Messages:
    612
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  13. Walt N

    Walt N Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2001
    Messages:
    417
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  14. Greg_R

    Greg_R Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2000
    Messages:
    1,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    Real Name:
    Greg
    My neighbors have a beagle that barks constantly. They have started training the dog with a shock collar and/or a squirt gun (the dog hates getting hit with water). They have started to transition to the shake can method. All three methods have shown dramatic improvement in the dog's behavior.

     
  15. Walt N

    Walt N Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2001
    Messages:
    417
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  16. JayV

    JayV Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    May 30, 2002
    Messages:
    612
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    But please remember that a timeout isn't punishment. My dog, for example, is very comfortable in her crate and enjoys napping and destroying her toys in it.

    Using a crate for a time out is intended to communicate displeasure with unwanted behavior by separating the dog from people (hence waiting 30 seconds out of sight). It isn't intended to punish and my dog, at least, understands the distinction.

    -j
     
  17. Shane Bos

    Shane Bos Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2002
    Messages:
    256
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    We use a spray bottle with lemon water in it to get Badger's and other animals to stop biting. It also works to stop dogs from barking it's just a cheaper version of the lemon spray collar I guess. It's moreuniversal though as collars just don't stay on Badger's very well.
     
  18. Drew Bethel

    Drew Bethel Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 1999
    Messages:
    1,209
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Jeff, I just purchased an E-book called: Teach Your Dog 100 English Words...and it covers excessive barking, possible reasons, and ways to stop it. PM if you would like me to email you a copy...it's about 4 megs large so beware.
     
  19. Jeff Perry

    Jeff Perry Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2003
    Messages:
    89
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  20. Shane Bos

    Shane Bos Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2002
    Messages:
    256
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    yeah badgers, skunks, bears, tigers, jaguars you name I've probably had one or do have one.

    side note I too have been bitten by a tiger. I'm glad she was only about 9 months when it happened and she was just playing cause it still hurts like a SOB and cat wounds run a very high risk of infection if not looked after properly.
     

Share This Page