How to solving for volume of a cylinder

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by Shawn Shultzaberger, Oct 28, 2003.

  1. Shawn Shultzaberger

    Shawn Shultzaberger Supporting Actor

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    To solve for the volume of a cylinder, would the equation be:

    3.14 x Radius squared x Height


    So lets assume that I have a sonotube that is 16" in diameter and 32" tall. The radius is half of the diameter which would equal 8 inches therefore the equation would be:

    3.14 x 8 squared x 32
    3.14 x 64 x 32
    = 6430.72 cu.in. or 3.72 cu.ft.??

    I'm trying re-teach myself math by applying it to something that I enjoy.


    [​IMG]
     
  2. Pete Mazz

    Pete Mazz Supporting Actor

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    Yup!

    Pete
     
  3. Kyle Richardson

    Kyle Richardson Screenwriter

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    [​IMG] for your forehead [​IMG]

    Yeah, I was surprised how much math is involved in speaker and subwoofer building when I first started.
     
  4. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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    It's just geometry.
     
  5. Dave Milne

    Dave Milne Supporting Actor

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    Just wait until you try some irregular, "curvy" enclosures. Solving finite integrals is a sure way to break a few pencils. [​IMG]

    Hey, speaking of "speaker math", one time I botched the conversion from metric to english and used 28.3 (the conversion from liters to cubic feet) instead of 25.4 (the conversion from millimeters to inches). The speakers went together perfectly, but were 39% under target volume. DOH! [​IMG]
     

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