How to remove burn-in from the TV screen?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Thik Nongyow, Jul 24, 2002.

  1. Thik Nongyow

    Thik Nongyow Stunt Coordinator

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    With the concerns over burn-in as I do play video games a lot, once the TV had been affected by it, how to remove it? Does it require a technician to remove the phosphors from the TV or change the glass screen?
     
  2. Joel Mack

    Joel Mack Cinematographer

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    Most likely, if you're suffering from burn-in, you'll have to replace the CRTs, which can cost as much (or more) than the TV did in the first place...
     
  3. Jim FC

    Jim FC Stunt Coordinator

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    In theory, if you can produce an exact negative image of the burned-in image, you can run it on the display and even out the aging. This, of course, is virtually impossible, but it is how certain plasmas combat the problem (plasmas do not have phosphors per se, but they do suffer from burn-in type problems). Running the TV on a "white noise" signal, ie the black-and-white-dots pattern, can help even out the image, but only if it's minor. Individual phosphors cannot be replaced, and the 'glass screen' is not where the burn-in takes place, so replacing that doesn't help, either. As Joel said, replacing the CRTs is the only practical way to fix a burn-in problem.
     
  4. Kirk Gunn

    Kirk Gunn Screenwriter

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    I was reading another thread and someone had an estimate of 1800.00 to repari a 50" RPTV....

    Yikes !
     
  5. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    For a direct view TV, changing the glass screen means replacing the entire picture tube, and that too can cost as much as the TV did.
    The phosphors cannot be changed in a direct view color TV tube, there is a grill just behind the screen that is sealed in place. Even if they could, replacing the picture tube, expensive as that is, is more expedient.
    The phosphors are put on a direct view glass screen before the glass is assembled onto the picture tube to become the front.
    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     
  6. Joel Mack

    Joel Mack Cinematographer

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    It should also be mentioned that a modern-day, direct-view TV tube is darn near impossible to burn, anyhow...
     
  7. John Royster

    John Royster Screenwriter

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