How to get job in Europe, if you're American.

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Marshall Alsup, Jul 15, 2002.

  1. Marshall Alsup

    Marshall Alsup Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2001
    Messages:
    497
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hey guys,

    I'm going to graduate with a degree in computer science at Christmas and I'd like to live and work in Europe for a couple years. I've never been outside the States and I've always wanted to have a rather long term visit to Europe.

    The job market isn't the best right now in the US and I assume its equally poor over there so I dont know if this is the best idea, it's just something I'd really like to do.

    How is the tech sector over there? Specifically in England, Germany, or elsewhere in northern Europe?

    Is this possible? What would I have to do to get the ball rolling?


    Thanks,
    Marshall
     
  2. Jason Hughes

    Jason Hughes Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 1998
    Messages:
    882
    Likes Received:
    0
    Real Name:
    Jason Hughes
    Do you speak any other languages?
     
  3. Marshall Alsup

    Marshall Alsup Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2001
    Messages:
    497
    Likes Received:
    0
    thats another problem..... I speak minimal spanish only :b

    One of my friends from Italy speaks Italian, Swedish, and English fluently, another friend speaks Italian, German, Swiss-German, French, and English. Damn, I just speak english and piss poor spanish!
     
  4. MickeS

    MickeS Producer

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2000
    Messages:
    5,058
    Likes Received:
    1
    I'd be interested to find out too. Personally, I think it might be easiest just to try and find an employer here with European divisions, and get transferred over there.

    /Mike
     
  5. Greg_R

    Greg_R Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2000
    Messages:
    1,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    Real Name:
    Greg
    As Mike suggested, joining a company and transferring overseas is the best method (the company takes care of all the Visa / work permit messes). That's the method my friend used who went to work in Germany (and couldn't speak a word of German). Although it was a transfer within his company, it shows that it is possible to work over there with minimal language skills (you will pick up the language quickly).
     
  6. Michael_Y

    Michael_Y Extra

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2001
    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    0
    Actually, I've been doing some research on the subject (specifically working in Germany) and I even went to Munich this winter in order to ask a friend working there. The short story is that finding a job ranges from rather difficult to fairly easy, depending on your education level and field of work. Although Germany have struggled in recent years to decrease the unemployment rate, the demand on the IT field is extremely high as the native Germans with a relative background are too few to cover the business' needs. Hence, a degree in Computer Science is a huge benefit for those seeking a decent job and salaries are extremely respectful. Also, a basic-intermediate knowledge of German is essential, IMO. You're prone to learn the language there, but an early comfort with it makes a substantial difference.
    I'm hopefully getting my degree in Computer Engineering this
    year and am seriously thinking of taking an MSc course in southern Germany. From what I've been told it's quite possible that, upon finishing, a job offer is certain (note the word 'offer'). You might want to consider that alternative, since you'll also get a chance to learn the language while at university.
     
  7. Matt Gordon

    Matt Gordon Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2001
    Messages:
    534
    Likes Received:
    1
    I thought Monster.com had an international site or setting. You may want to check that out.


    Matt
     
  8. Dave Poehlman

    Dave Poehlman Producer

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2000
    Messages:
    3,813
    Likes Received:
    0
    A word about learning German. It's not too hard to get a basic vocabulary going. It is difficult to learn to speak well.

    My wife and I took a short language class before we took a vacation there.. it helped a lot, but I will tell you, I probably learned more German while I was over there just being immersed in it.
     
  9. SteveA

    SteveA Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    May 25, 2000
    Messages:
    700
    Likes Received:
    0
    The only language barrier you'll face if you move to Canada is remembering to say "aboat" instead of "about"! [​IMG]
     
  10. BradyB

    BradyB Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2000
    Messages:
    82
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have lived/worked in Germany and I am currently working part-time in the US, And the hardest part of getting the job in any foriegn country is the Paper work.

    I have found that the easiest and perhaps the quickest way to get working in the country of your choice is to find a multi-national corporation, work there for a bit, then get transfered to another country. Thats how i got to Germany.
    I would say the paperwork for the visa is the most tedious part of it, but most multi-nationals have good departments of lawyers to handle this. Still it will take AT LEAST 8 months for germany, and it took alot less to get into the US, only about 4 months, but I already had most of the information to send out.

    Getting into Canada, beautiful country indeed!!!, I have heard from co-workers and friends that it takes about 4 months depending on where u are coming from.

    Working abroad, is definatly fun, but it can be scary. Most larger cities will have international groups/clubs and new-comers clubs... do look into those.. it makes transition even easier. And if you can, ask people what you should bring. you will be suprised what you will miss.

    In Germany, don't worry too much about the language barrier.. most people will speak english to you even if you want to speak German to them. Aswell more and more companies are changing to english as the official language of the company(banks especially).

    And remeber to have fun and go out every weekend, I lived in Germany for 4 years(the job initially started as only 2 years), and I only saw a small bit of what the area had to offer. I don't regret anything, and I went out everyweekend and used all my vacation.

    Good luck to everyone.
     

Share This Page