How to cover a window with a half-moon shaped top?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by MickeS, Sep 17, 2001.

  1. MickeS

    MickeS Producer

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    Hi all, I have a little problem...
    We moved to a new house last month, and decided to make one room into a TV-room (I wouldn't exactly call it a home theater [​IMG]).
    I know almost exactly what I want to do with the room, but the first thing I want to do is be able to darken it, so I can at least watch TV during the day on weekends.
    Here's my problem: the window in the room looks like this: http://photomail.photoworks.com/scripts/download2.dll?getimage?2~1~24C2gPO8B2qgKc8QorrXq3X FhWH2NExLuBeYNFdB/UauTzrfyOu6Xux0kHsWjfVP
    This picture is taken at night and right now we have some temporary paper blinds in there. We can't for the life of us figure out a good way to cover the top window though... I'd like to be able to cover it enough that very little light gets in.
    Anyone has any ideas?
    /Mike
    [Edited last by MickeS on September 17, 2001 at 03:17 PM]
     
  2. Deane Johnson

    Deane Johnson Supporting Actor

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    The link you provided doesn't seem to be workable on my browser, but I believe you are referring to what we call an arch window.
    HunterDouglas makes a number of shades that will fit these. Perhaps of most interest would be the blackout honeycomb material used in the Duettes. In home theaters applications we most often use the Duettes in the blackout Eclipse models. These shades to fit an arch can be made moveable or stationiary.
    You local HunterDouglas dealer can make a template of the window and have a shade made to exactly fit. You will have the usual problem of light leaking around the shade.
    If you don't want total blackout and want to match other shades, there are alternatives in wood slats, metal mini-blinds and other things.
    Deane
     
  3. Deane Johnson

    Deane Johnson Supporting Actor

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    The link is working now. Yes, that should be doable. Some dealers are better than others at these things, and I'm not sure how to suggest how you pick the right one.
    I am assuming there is a divider across where the paper shades are hanging from. I would put up blackout Duettes. You could probably have all three shades match.
    Deane
     
  4. Andrea W

    Andrea W Supporting Actor

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    You can replace the paper blinds with permanent blinds and put up a curtain rod for a valance just to cover that top part.
    ------------------
    http://darius.mobius-soft.com/~andrea/ht/
     
  5. MickeS

    MickeS Producer

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    Thanks for your replies.
    Deane, the blackout honeycomb shades was exactly what we were thinking of getting for this window. However, we can't see how they would fit in the top window, since it doesn't even have a half-circle shaped arch, it's just slightly bent. How would it be mounted in order to be moveable? I don't have enough experience with this to figure out how that would work. [​IMG]
    Do you know of any resources on the web where I could get ideas on how to do this (I'd prefer a DIY solution, to keep the cost down)?
    Andrea, your suggestion is our backup plan. [​IMG] However, it wouldn't darken the room as much as blinds would, I think, so we've tried to avoid it. If all else fails, we'll do that.
    If anyone has any experience putting in shades in this kind of window, I'd love to hear about it.
    /Mike
     
  6. Steve Tannehill

    Steve Tannehill Ambassador

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    I have a similar window and had a custom "eyebrow arch" made by Hunter Douglas. The wood slats of varying lengths (longer to the left and right, shorter in the middle) are held at the bottom by a half-moon assembly, and the slats then fan out. They turn slightly, as well, so you can let in light if you wish. I'll see if I can take a picture. It was expensive, around $400 (which was more than twice the cost of the 2-inch basswood blinds beneath the arch). Well worth it, though...it looks great.
    - Steve
     
  7. Deane Johnson

    Deane Johnson Supporting Actor

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    Mike:
    I understand your goal to keep the costs down, but if you are considering a custom shade for that spot, it isn't a DIY project.
    There are other alternatives that might be DIY that I haven't thought of. Perhaps someone else will.
    If you'll post the dimensions of the arch I'll be able to tell you what you should ask for and about what it should cost. You can then decide if that fits the budget you want to apply or not. While you're at it, give me the dimensions of the other two shades and I'll give you approximate prices on those two. (I am a HD dealer, but don't sell on the internet. Anything should be done locally.) I'll also explain how it works.
    We could do this by email, but I think it helps other members with similar problems gain knowledge on costs and approach also.
    Bascially, the "headrail" for the shade will be on the bottom. There will be a string that runs up to a small cord guide at the top of your arch, then back down do the "headrail". The string is light colored and doesn't stick out much when the shade is down. When it is up, it doesn't show at all. There is a slider bar on the headrail that moves back and forth to make the string pull the shade up to the top. The shade will have been cut to the shape of your window. There is an extention pole avialable to reach up and move the "slider bar" if you can't reach it standing on the floor.
    We are now able to do these motorized remote control using PowerRise components, but we are probably the only HD dealer in the country that can. Obviously, we can only do it locally where we can manage the logistics. Didn't mean to temp you.
    Deane
    [Edited last by Deane Johnson on September 17, 2001 at 08:37 PM]
     
  8. Steve Tannehill

    Steve Tannehill Ambassador

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    Here's the picture of my eyebrow arch.
    - Steve
    [Edited last by Steve Tannehill on September 17, 2001 at 09:58 PM]
     
  9. Marc S Kessler

    Marc S Kessler Stunt Coordinator

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    I was watching one of those home improvement shows on Discovery or TLC last week and saw blinds made for that type of application. I even commented to my wife what a neat idea. They actually opened and closed like regular blinds but are fan shaped. I'm sorry I can't tell you anymore eccept that they exsist. If I can get more info I'll post it here for you.
     
  10. MickeS

    MickeS Producer

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    Deane, thanks a lot for your help in describing how it works! Your description along with Steve's picture gave me a good idea of how something like this would look and work.
    It definitely doesn't sound like a DIY type thing, at least not for someone like me who has zero experience putting up shades...
    I will get you the dimensions and style of shades we would be interested in, and maybe you could let me know what a reasonable price would be. I'd certainly appreciate all the help I can get!
    Steve, thank you for the picture! That looks like something we'd be interested in, except perhaps we'd want the honeycomb blackout shades. Do you know if it's possible to get it in an inside mount instead? Would it be too much to ask if you could get a picture of it when it's up too? [​IMG]
    I assume these are two different solutions to the same problem (unless I completely misunderstand Deane's description), so I wonder which one is the best?
    Thanks for your help guys, I will pass this on to my wife. [​IMG]
    /Mike
    [Edited last by MickeS on September 18, 2001 at 07:33 PM]
     
  11. Deane Johnson

    Deane Johnson Supporting Actor

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    Yes the Duettes are a different type solution than Steve has. It depends a lot on what you are wanting for the final look in your room, as well as light blockage. For total home theater darkness, something you have inidcated is not your goal, the Duettes have more potential to stop all light. They have the negative issue of stopping all light from coming through, so if you have them half way up, it's sort of like a piece of plywood blocking that portion of the window. Steve's woods can be set with the slats slanted to allow some light through.
    I am assuming Steve is seeing some light leakage through his slats even when they are closed. Perhaps you can confirm this for us Steve. With the blackout Duette, you'll get light leakage around the edge
    unless you deal with it.
    I should have told you that for purposes of estimating the cost, just measure the overall width of the shade and the overall height.
    Also, for the lower windows, are you needing two shades, or one like Steve has? There's less light leakage with one. I can't tell if you just have two paper shades up, or if there is one pane of glass clear accross.
     

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