How thick of MDF can you cut using a router and circle jig?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by jeff lam, Nov 14, 2001.

  1. jeff lam

    jeff lam Screenwriter

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    I don't know tools very well(at least the ones you guys use for projects) but I have used routers, table saws, jig saws, sanders, etc...
    I have never cut through a peice of wood using a router though, I always thought a router was for trimming/edging.
    Anyway, how is it that a router can cut through 3/4" MDF and make a perfect circle? How thick of a peice can it cut? Do they make 1" MDF BTW?
    What about that RotoZip tool I see on TV, anyone use it? Is it any good?
    Thanks!
     
  2. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Studio Mogul

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    Just make multiple passes with a router, changing the depth 0.25" to 0.5" at a time (whatever you're comfortable with). It's not rocket science. Just make sure you measure the right radius takking into account the drill bit width before you use the circle jig to route the hole.
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  3. Robert_J

    Robert_J Lead Actor

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    I cut 13/16 MDF last weekend with a Skil 1 3/4HP plunge router and a 1/4" spiral up-cut plunge bit. I used the Jasper model 200 circle cutting jig also. I could have cut as deep as the router would go BUT not in one pass. I would cut thru the 13/16 in four or five passes. Any deeper and it would start smoking!
    -Robert
     
  4. jeff lam

    jeff lam Screenwriter

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    I understand, I had to use different depths and multiple trys when I was cutting out a cavity for a 9V battery in my Bass Guitar, but I was using a much smaller/weaker router. I wasn't sure if the larger/powerful ones can do it in one pass.
     
  5. Tom-K

    Tom-K Stunt Coordinator

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    I cut through my endcaps with my skill plunge. They were 2 1/4 inches thick. Just a slow process.
     
  6. Greg_R

    Greg_R Screenwriter

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    Another method is to build the box one layer at a time. After the first hole, rough out the next layer with a jig saw (or handsaw). Then use your router with a flush trim bit, using the first layer as a template. This way you're not limited by the plunge depth of your router...
    Greg
     
  7. Dennis Kindig

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    I use the router to make the recess for the driver flange and then complete the hole with a jig saw. Use a nail, string and pencil to draw a circle marking the cutout after routing the recess.
    No one will ever see the edge of the hole and it saves a lot of work not having to make router passes 1/4" at a time.
    Dennis
     

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