How much of this stuff applies?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Wade_Kennerson, Jan 22, 2003.

  1. Wade_Kennerson

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    I have been reading here for over a month on various aspects of home theater setup, but a question remains.

    How much of this stuff applies to the person with mid-level to lower end stuff? For example, I live in an apartment, and have my home theater setup in an open space room, rather than a custom built room specific to the use.

    My equipment is as follows:
    Yamaha HTR-5560 A/V Receiver
    Sony DVP-670D DVD Player
    JBL HLS Series Speakers (HLS810 Fronts, Center, HLS410 Surrounds)
    JBL PB10 Subwoofer
    Panasonic 51HX42 RPTV (4:3 HDTV)

    Given an equipment list like mine, would things like TV calibration and audio calibration (using SPL meter) make a noticable change?

    It is very easy to get caught up in the HT fanaticism, but hard to know where you will benefit the most. Any insight would be greatly appreciated seeing how I am fairly new to the concepts.
     
  2. ChrisMcK

    ChrisMcK Stunt Coordinator

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    I find myself in the same situation. I want my equipment to sound it's best but I don't want to be dropping a boatload of money i getting it just right. I'll save that for when I have my own house and a dedicated room
     
  3. KenE

    KenE Extra

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    Not having a good display, I can only speak to audio calibration.

    Go to Radio Shack and buy the meter! (and tripod if you haven't one)

    You'd be surprised at the difference calibrated sound makes. Some scenes sound so good they scare me now. Example! Extended Fellowship of the Rings when Sauron gives Sauramon the command to build an orc army. Sauron's voice is everywhere and balanced everywhere.
     
  4. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

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    I second the audio calibration. Also, if your TV has more than one video setting, I would use one setting for regular broadcast cable and the other setting for DVD watching and I would calibrate the latter.
     
  5. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    Don't think that just because you have a crappy TV, that video calibration won't help. I once calibrated a REALLY crappy, RCA tv that I thought would never look good no matter what, and after the few test screens, I put in LOTR again, and it was SOOOOO much better. And this was via an RF modulator mind you. In the interim of getting a nice new HDTV, I am using an older, but nice sony trinitron, which I have long since lost the remote for, so I can't access the menu to adjust anything but the hue. Needless to say, even with my FAR better tv, I'd take a well-calibrated POS RCA than my over-bright over-saturated nice display. Video calibration is significant, and easy to do. I doubly recommend it since you have a HD display.
     
  6. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    think of calibrating as a means to get "the best you can" out of your gear. it's your way of ensuring that you will run your gear at it's optimal settings.

    it doesn't really matter if you have hi-end stuff, or middle-of-the-road stuff.

    either way you'll still want to tune it up...right?
     
  7. Wade_Kennerson

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    Thanks folks for the responses. I will look into the meter and the AVIA disc. Radio Shack being the easier of the two to track down. I will probably order AVIA at amazon or something.

    From what I have read here, AVIA does video calibration as well. I suppose that should do for now.

    Thanks once again for the feedback.
     

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