How much bandwidth is needed to pass a 1080i signal?

Discussion in 'Playback Devices' started by Daniel Becker, May 30, 2003.

  1. Daniel Becker

    Daniel Becker Second Unit

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    I'm looking at component switchers at Crutchfield.com and i've found a JVC for $99. It says it allows 30mhz of component video bandwidth. If I hook my xbox up to it will it transmit the 720p or 1080i signal? Thanks.



    Dan.B
     
  2. Craig Robertson

    Craig Robertson Supporting Actor

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    the 30MHz unit has sufficient bandwidth and will work fine.
    what happens when you don't have enough bandwidth isn't that the signal doesn't get thru, but that high freq info is rolled off, resulting in a loss of detail.
     
  3. Daniel Becker

    Daniel Becker Second Unit

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    Thanks. When you say it will work though do you mean it will lose a little detail or it will pass the signal through without any problems?




    Dan.B
     
  4. Craig Robertson

    Craig Robertson Supporting Actor

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    based on bandwidth, it should pass the signal without a loss of detail.[​IMG]
     
  5. ManW_TheUncool

    ManW_TheUncool Producer

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    I don't know. I don't trust the spec listed by Crutchfield since it's not what's listed elsewhere. I believe most other places list 10Mhz only.

    Even if it's 30Mhz (+/-3db), that's probably not ideal for HD signals. I'd feel more safe w/ at least 2x the bandwidth. Also, from what I hear, it might not merely be a loss of detail when bandwidth is too limited. You might get distracting video artifacts that you might not normally consider "loss of detail" or softer picture.

    Anyway, for $60 more, you can get an Inday switcher (www.inday.com) that claims 230Mhz(!) bandwidth AND remote controllability. Also, for same price as the JVC, you can get the AVTool unit from www.avtoolbox.com that claims 100Mhz bandwidth AND remote controllability also. There's no reason to get the JVC w/ those alternatives available. I'm debating between these 2 myself.

    _Man_
     
  6. Mark Hedges

    Mark Hedges Second Unit

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    Before you start spending money based on bandwidth concerns, you need to look at your TV. You have a Sony 32HS500, right? I remember reading somewhere that the internal HD bandwidth on these is only 10mhz anyway so I wouldn't worry about it.

    Mark
     
  7. Daniel Becker

    Daniel Becker Second Unit

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    Thanks guys. Mark, i'm taking delivery on a 36HS500 this Monday. I don't know if you saw my other thread but I ended up paying $1250 for it! Yeah, a really nice price for sure.[​IMG] I'm just making sure i've got everything before it's delivered. I picked up some nice Monster cables yesterday and now I just need a component switcher. I'm hooking up a progressive DVD player (SONY 725P) and my PS2, Gamecube, and Xbox.

    Are you saying the HS500 only have the 10mhz? Do the XBR's have 30mhz?



    Dan.B
     
  8. ManW_TheUncool

    ManW_TheUncool Producer

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    That's true. In general, current direct-view HDTVs cannot display that much of the HD resolution, so it'd make sense that they also have reduced internal bandwidth. However, I'd think that if you're gonna spend $100 on a switcher anyway, why not play it safe and also add remote control access?

    Also, I'd feel safer letting the TV's electronics filter out the extra bandwidth as it would be designed for that than letting the switcher do it arbitrarily. Besides, if he upgrades his TV, he won't need to upgrade the switcher also.

    _Man_
     

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