How much and where to put a light source during viewing?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Josh Lowe, Aug 25, 2002.

  1. Josh Lowe

    Josh Lowe Screenwriter

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    I have come to notice that a small amount of soft light in the room can have a very notable impact on my TV's display, for the better. I have no protective shield so glare isn't an issue. My HT room has no windows so I have pretty good control over how much light there is. I know some people put small lamps behind their TVs to combat eyestrain/fatigure. But I've also noticed that a small amount of light in the room actually improves the display on an RPTV. I'm not sure how to describe it other than it "smooths" out the image and really does make it look more "theater like".

    Is there a theory or consensus behind this about how much light can be used and where to place it, ideally, in relation to an RPTV?

    I guess it's not a real surprise since I've noticed that most theaters don't completely turn out the lights when the film begins..
     
  2. GeorgeAB

    GeorgeAB Second Unit

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    G. Alan Brown
    The principles that govern ambient lighting conditions in a video viewing environment are thoroughly researched, quantified and specified by the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers (SMPTE). Many industry authorities have written periodically about these issues in most of the home theater magazines over the years since SMPTE's human factors research was done in the mid '80s.
    The chairman of that SMPTE committee was Joe Kane, author of "Video Essentials" the original home theater set up DVD. He discusses "the ideal viewing environment" on that DVD. There is also some information in the "Avia Guide to Home Theater" DVD in the narrative and on some of the "hot button" text boxes selectable in the DVD's menu.
    Visit www.ideal-lume.com and review the information in the Ideal-Lume section with the associated links for a decent overview of recommendations for video environment viewing conditions.
    Requirements for commercial theaters are quite different due to the much dimmer light levels coming off of the screen and the relatively large area the screen occupies in the audience's field of view.
    Best regards and beautiful pictures,
    G. Alan Brown, President
    CinemaQuest, Inc.
    Insist on HDTV! [​IMG]
     
  3. Josh Lowe

    Josh Lowe Screenwriter

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    Thanks. I have Avia, I'll go back through it to find the part you're referencing. I've always jumped straight to the test screens and sounds in Avia, never looked at the various discussion portions much.
     
  4. Jim Peavy

    Jim Peavy Supporting Actor

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    Josh, we've been having a discussion about just this thing over at the HT Basics Area, started by your's truly.
    To make a long story short, I've gone ahead and ordered the Ideal-Lume (!).[​IMG]
     

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