How long do RPTV's last?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Anthony.Lin, Oct 2, 2002.

  1. Anthony.Lin

    Anthony.Lin Stunt Coordinator

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    Just asking this because I passed by a decent deal for a used Mits RPTV for very cheap. However, it's about 6 years old. I know it's been pretty well taken care of, with the contrast usually turned down, but how much longer do you think this TV will last? I've been reading that RPTV's have a lifespan of about 8-9 years max in a few places, dunno if that's universally pretty true?
    Just a quick short response would be welcome [​IMG]
     
  2. Mike I

    Mike I Supporting Actor

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    Average CRT life is 10,000 hours which is 8 to 10 years...Again that is an average....If the previous owner had contrast set high, the life of the CRTs could be considerably shortened...On the other hand some of had 12 to 15 years use out of some RPTV's..
     
  3. Dave H

    Dave H Producer

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    My RPTV is three years old and going very strong. In 3-4 more years, is my picture going to look just as good as today? (assuming I get another ISF calibration - had one done a year ago).

    My TV has gotten a lot of use in three years time. I am pretty close to 9000 hours I would say.
     
  4. Mark Lehmkuhl

    Mark Lehmkuhl Stunt Coordinator

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    My Hitachi Ultravision 50" is 6.5 years old, tuned with Video Essentials from day one (i.e. low contrast). Normal amount of use (few hours in the morning and evening). I had my first repair this past September - and a second just last week! Small things like blown resistor on the board, etc. Cost for the first was $160 so I had it done, even though I debated whether that would be the start of a series of problems. Sure enough two months later another blown board component fixed for free since it was only two months since last repair even though it was not the same repair - I lucked out since the second problem had same symptoms as first, so repairman came out to do the work under the first repair warranty. When he found it was different, he didn't charge me (just a couple dollar resistor).

    I also don't want to buy a new widescreen for a couple more years - let that price slide down while the technology goes way up!

    IMO I would not buy a 6 year old RPTV unless you could get it for a couple hundred dollars. Even then youare taking a risk that it might be at that 'beginning of the end' stage.
     
  5. PatrickM

    PatrickM Screenwriter

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    I have an old Pioneer widescreen RPTV that I bought back in the summer of 1994 so its well over 8 years old now and it still operates nicely. The horizontal hold is a little off when it first turns on but syncs back up within minutes of warming up.

    Patrick
     
  6. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    At 6 years old, the TV had better be really inexpensive.
    Open up a back panel and peek inside at the CRT's. If there is a visible brown pattern etched on them when they are off, their remaining life before visible burn effects are seen on the screen is uncertain.
    On average ou will get the upgrade-itus bug before the TV breaks, if you are taking good care of the TV.
    Just that older RPTV's probably don't have the dot crawl free comb filter let alone component video, 64 to 100 point convergence, 16:9 mode, or as flexible geometric distortion correction and other niceties as the newer sets have.
    As the set ages, being able to get convergence, overscan, and geometric distortion within acceptable tolerance all at the same time becomes increasingly more dependent on luck.
    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     
  7. Paul McElligott

    Paul McElligott Cinematographer

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    Real Name:
    Paul McElligott
     
  8. Christopher a

    Christopher a Stunt Coordinator

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    Question: I very rarely use my RPTV. I average let's say 4 hours a week. Is it hurting my TV by going long lengths of time without using it? I do notice that the warm-up period seems to be much longer when I don't use my set for a week or two.

    Chris
     

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