How is a person "Fatally wounded"?

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Jay H, Apr 24, 2003.

  1. Jay H

    Jay H Producer

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    Now doesn't fatal imply death while wounded implies just an injury??? Never understood those cases where I'd hear "fatally wounded" and have no idea whether the subject lived or died. Humpfh!

    Jay
     
  2. Malcolm R

    Malcolm R Executive Producer

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    I agree. It does seem like an oxymoron.
     
  3. Evan Case

    Evan Case Screenwriter

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    Fatally wounded means you don't die right away, but you will later as a result of your injuries.

    For example: two soldiers are injured in combat and taken to the hospital. One lost a leg, but is in no danger of dying. The other was brought into the hospital alive, but with massive head trauma that he will later die of. The former was "wounded" and the latter "fatally wounded."

    Evan
     
  4. Keith Mickunas

    Keith Mickunas Cinematographer

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    Fatally wounded means the person didn't die immediately, but the cause of death was directly related to the wound.
     
  5. Cees Alons

    Cees Alons Moderator
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    IMO "fatally wounded" also includes the case of instantanious death as a result of the wound. So it means: wounded severely enough to die from it (life can no longer be sustained by the organism), no matter when.

    Cees
     
  6. Holadem

    Holadem Lead Actor

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    What I want to know is how the hell does someone die instanly of shot in the chest or in the stomach as protrayed in so many movies. Even in the heart, I would think the rest of the body would still be able to "survive" for several seconds before death occurs (defined as when electrical activity ceases in the brain? Where have I read that?).

    Also what the hell is "shock"?

    --
    Holadem
     
  7. BrianW

    BrianW Cinematographer

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  8. Keith Mickunas

    Keith Mickunas Cinematographer

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    Hmm, I thought electrocuted and strangled didn't necessarily mean death occurred. I checked the dictionary and one definition of strangled does, another doesn't. If someone wraps their hands around your throat, and you don't die, what would you call it? Same as with being shocked by electricity. I don't say that I was electric shocked while working on some wiring, I say I was electrocuted. That I think is fairly common now.

    The meanings of these words have been changed, for better or worse, and now its basically necessary to specify what is meant.
     
  9. Nathan*W

    Nathan*W Screenwriter

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  10. Henry Gale

    Henry Gale Producer

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    On this subject...I think many people don't understand the meaning of casualty.
    On the battlefield a "casualty" is: a military person lost through death, wounds, injury, sickness, internment, or capture or through being missing in action.
     
  11. Joe Szott

    Joe Szott Screenwriter

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    Here's what I always thought, but it's just my personal interpretation:

    * Fatally Wounded is when death has already occurred from a physical trauma of some nature. Anyone that was shot, stabbed, fell off a roof, or whatever, once they are dead they were originally "fatally wounded"

    * Mortally wounded is the same except they aren't dead yet. Someone who is shot in the chest or just fell off a building could be "mortally wounded." Once they actually die from it, they they were "fatally wounded." Mortally wounded also isn't 100%, someone could possibly recover from it.

    I've heard these two terms used inchangably before, like saying "Lincoln was mortally wounded by JW Boothe," even though obviously this was a long time ago. But I suspect that is why you hear fatally wounded in the news so much, because they are normally reporting things after they happen (and the people are then dead.)
     
  12. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Again, "fatally wounded" means one's wounds will lead to death. Robert F. Kennedy was fatally wounded after being shot outside the kitchen of L.A.'s Ambassador Hotel, but he did not die until hours later.

    Nothing oxymoronic or redundant about the phrase.

    The space shuttle Orbiter Columbia apparently was fatally wounded 81 seconds after the STS-107 liftoff, but the spacecraft did not disintegrate until sixteen days later during reentry.
     
  13. Rain

    Rain Producer

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  14. Cees Alons

    Cees Alons Moderator
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  15. Jay H

    Jay H Producer

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    I believe I have heard the term "almost strangled to death" or "almost electrocuted to death"

    I find it funny at work when I read documents that have blank pages, they usually put "This page is intentially blank" smack dab in the middle of them to signify that the page is intentionally blank. I'm waiting to see something like "Oops, forgot a page" or "I stole this page" somewhere in my travels [​IMG]

    Jay
     
  16. Mark Brewer

    Mark Brewer Stunt Coordinator

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    My best friend is a Paramedic in Portland OR and He ran a call on a DOA one day. He stated on his report that the patient was stable. The shift sup. called him into the office sometime later and asked why he wrote stable.
    Jason stated "Yey he was stable, I didn't see the guy getting any better or worse".
    Needless to say the sup didn't see his point of view.
     
  17. Yee-Ming

    Yee-Ming Producer

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  18. Mario Bartel

    Mario Bartel Stunt Coordinator

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  19. Jason Merrick

    Jason Merrick Supporting Actor

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    "Near Miss" has always sounded funny to me. Doesn't that mean that they nearly missed but instead collided? It's never used that way, but that is how it sounds to me.
     
  20. D. Scott MacDonald

    D. Scott MacDonald Supporting Actor

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