How do you pronounce Hsu?

Discussion in 'Speakers' started by Marcel_V, May 4, 2004.

  1. Marcel_V

    Marcel_V Stunt Coordinator

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    Dorky question, I know, but can someone phonetically spell it out for me? Is it like "Sue" or "Zoo"?
     
  2. Nathan Stohler

    Nathan Stohler Second Unit

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    I say "aych ess yoo".
     
  3. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    Shoe [​IMG]

    I say "H S U" also.
     
  4. Matt_Smi

    Matt_Smi Second Unit

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    From the HSU site...


    "Most people pronouce it “sue”. An alternate pronunciation is “shoe”. Use whichever one is easier to remember. Dr. Hsu's employees often use "sue"."
     
  5. Jason Brent

    Jason Brent Second Unit

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    gesundheit


    he, he
     
  6. Brad_See

    Brad_See Stunt Coordinator

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    It's definitely not aych-ess-yoo. Also, when I was living in China I never heard Hs pronounced "sh" but some people do different things with their names when they come to America.

    brad cook
     
  7. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    Technically, Chinese pronunciation would be "shu", the way I understand it. I think the pronunciation changes in the US often due to many people mis-pronouncing, not because the person changes it [​IMG]
     
  8. Brad_See

    Brad_See Stunt Coordinator

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    John,

    Yeah, actually I meant that people change it out of convenience because it gets mispronounced so often.

    It might be "shu" in some parts of China. Things get pronounced differently in different regions. I lived way up north. The only letters that created something close to an "sh" sound were (romanized) "x" as in "xiu" and "sh" as in "Shanghai." Down south though I seem to remember some of the people saying "si" like "shi" now that you mention it. It's just not "proper" Chinese. [​IMG] Mr. Hsu very well might pronounce his name like that.

    brad cook
     
  9. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    [​IMG] darn mispronunciation... Whatever language, we can butcher it here in the US.
     
  10. Danny Tse

    Danny Tse Producer

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    Wait til I come out with a component named after my last name, then you guys can guess how it's pronounced. [​IMG]
     
  11. Cameron Yee

    Cameron Yee Executive Producer
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    From what little Mandarin I've learned, the "sh" sound like "shoe" is not exactly correct. There is a curling of the tongue toward the roof of the mouth to get the proper sound. Not easy to do if you're not used to doing it.
     
  12. Jason GT

    Jason GT Second Unit

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    I'd pronounce it, roughly, "soo", though this is a Westernized form. Ferinstance, I'd be inclined to to pronounce Danny's last name as "tSee" (almost like "see", very very very slight "t"), but in Mandarin I'm guessing it's "xie", and in Cantonese probably roughly "jie" (jeh) - with the requisite tones of course; this is nothing like the western pronounciation.
     
  13. MuneebM

    MuneebM Supporting Actor

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    how do you pronounce STF? I say "H S U Stuff" [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
  14. Cameron Yee

    Cameron Yee Executive Producer
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    For a long time the common Vietnamese surname "Nguyen" was a puzzle to me, until I actually met someone with it. The funny thing is I have another friend who married a guy with that last name, and despite knowing the proper pronunciation pronounces it "na-wen" instead of "wen." I guess he just grew up pronouncing it that way and can't change.
     
  15. Brad_See

    Brad_See Stunt Coordinator

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    Tsee could be a variant of xie but in Mandarin romanization (pinyin) 'c' is the letter that sounds like a slight 't' in front of an 's'.

    'X' at the beginning of a word makes more of a soft "sh" sound but without the tongue curled to the roof of the mouth as Cameron correctly mentioned.

    brad cook
     
  16. Jason GT

    Jason GT Second Unit

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    Mandarin is not my forte but this is an interesting discussion... so I'm hoping Danny comes back and confirms [​IMG]

    The western pronounciation would be "tsee" or whatever but that's just a western pronounciation - relatively irrelevant to the Chinese surname which I'm guessing is -

    [​IMG]

    (ŽÓ in unicode, ŽÓ in Big5)

    Brad, I'm curious, how long were you in China and where? It's pretty darn cool that you were there (as this thread sinks further and further OT...)
     
  17. Brad_See

    Brad_See Stunt Coordinator

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    I was there for just shy of a year in 2001-2002. I lived in Changchun in the Jilin province (borders Russia and Inner Mongolia). Changchun is full of car factories, Chinese students that come there to study and foreigners who are car factory execs and teachers. I was there as a teacher at a small private college. I also spent a summer down in Hefei, Anhui in 1996 as a student at Univ. of Science and Technology of China. I travelled a lot to other cities as well the last time I was there. I had a blast both times.

    brad cook
     
  18. Joe Hsu

    Joe Hsu Supporting Actor

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    It's pronounced "huh-soo".

    [​IMG]

    And no, no relation. ^_^
     
  19. Danny Tse

    Danny Tse Producer

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    Great discussion....being from Hong Kong, the pronounciation of "Tse" is similar to "Jeh". However, once I arrived in the US, people here pronounce "Tse" as "See". I sometimes hear "T-see" and just "T".
     
  20. Cameron Yee

    Cameron Yee Executive Producer
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    I've gotten into the habit of spelling my last name, Yee, whenever it's requested (my full response being "It's spelled Y-E-E."). Funny thing is people sometimes start writing a "W." I'm sure a brain expert could explain that crossing of wires.

    I've also noticed I sometimes have a hard time saying my own last name - can't seem to get a strong enough "yuh" sound, making it sound like "EE." This has made me consider going with the alternative spelling of "Yu" but that would really require a name change. And I can't tell you how many times it's been mistaken as "Lee" despite the obvious.
     

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