How do you know your native resolution?

Discussion in 'Displays' started by Clinton McClure, Aug 3, 2006.

  1. Clinton McClure

    Clinton McClure Casual Enthusiast
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    My 6 year old Toshiba TW40x81 accepts 480i, 480p and 1080i. How do I determine it's native resolution? The manual does not tell the set's native resolution. My xbox 360 is connected to it and displaying at 1080i and when I pick up my HD-DVD player, it will be as well.

    Also, why can a 6 year old set display at 1080i and yet not support 720p? Is 720p that much of a stretch between 480 and 1080? Do any and all displays with component inputs accept a 1080i signal?
     
  2. jonny h

    jonny h Agent

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    Clinton-

    Your TV has two different scan rates... one for 480p and one for 1080i. It's a CRT (analog) and as such really doesn't have a native resolution per se. Try setting your X-box to output 720p... it should take it. If I'm right, it will process the signal and output it at either 480p or 1080i (I'm not sure which one.)
     
  3. Michael TLV

    Michael TLV THX Video Instructor/Calibrator

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    Greetings

    I don't think the old 40x81 could handle a 720p signal at all ... it just gives you garbage.

    The TV works best with 480 and 1080 signals. 1080 is cheaper to make than 720 ... that is your answer.
     
  4. Clinton McClure

    Clinton McClure Casual Enthusiast
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    A 720p signal sent to the 40x81 gives me nothing.

    Thanks Michael! [​IMG]

    By the way, what is a fair price for a full ISF calibration? We're talking grayscale, geometry, removing a screen protector, focusing the guns, disabling SVM (did I get that right?), etc... A reputable A/V dealer I've been buying from for about 10 years has two techs who have been ISF certified for about a year. He quoted me $300 for the whole shebang. Does that sound about right?
     
  5. Jeff Gatie

    Jeff Gatie Lead Actor

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    $300 is about right for a CRT.
     
  6. Michael TLV

    Michael TLV THX Video Instructor/Calibrator

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    Greetings

    ISF suggested pricing for an RPTV for one grayscale is $275. This does not include any physical work with the set.

    If you are indeed getting the other services for just $25 more ... then it would be a good price. Full meal deal packages are typically $400 and up from the best calibrators.

    You might get what you pay for ... or you might just simply pay for what you get. [​IMG]

    If you are seriously considering the local guys ... ask to talk with the tech ... not the dealer ... since they have a habit of promising lots of things beyond the knowledge of the tech or without their knowledge.

    Have them tell you exactly what they expect to do with the TV.

    Regards
     
  7. jonny h

    jonny h Agent

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    Sorry for the spam... guess I should keep my big trap shut.
     
  8. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    From 480i to 480p is a big stretch for the picture tube electronics and also requires good de-interlacing for good results.

    From 480p to 1080i is a very small stretch and does not require de-interlacing or electronic re-interlacing. Optional diagonal smoothing processing can improve the results.

    From 480p to 720p is a big stretch for the picture tube electronics.

    From 480i directly to 1080i gives terrible results and should never happen.

    720p source to 1080i source is a small stretch for the input processing electronics but can result in 540p (sub-HD) quality even if the result is both formatted as and displayed as 1080i.

    Most CRT HDTV's are natively either "one speed" 1080i only or "two speed" 480p/960i and 540p/1080i. Most convert inputs automatically, a few have separate jacks for 480p input versus 1080i input. (The difference between displaying 540p or 1080ii is optical, does not happen automatically depending on a 480p versus 1080i source, and 540p can sometimes occur due to a defect.) Very few CRT HDTV's accept 720p, instead requiring some other device such as the set top tuner box to convert 720p source to something else.

    Every HDTV I know of accepts 1080i component video.

    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/viddoubl.htm
     
  9. Clinton McClure

    Clinton McClure Casual Enthusiast
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    Thanks again everyone.
     

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