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Ronald Epstein

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You know what's funny... the better my home theater becomes, the less I want to actually go to a regular cinema theater because my setup is 'better'. Higher picture quality, clearer and more identifiably-discrete sound, my seats have a power-adjustable headrest and the final nail in the coffin for theaters is that if I watch a movie at home there are zero crying babies or annoying people talking during dialogue.

Jake,

Everything you just posted mirrors my personal opinion.

One more thing I added to my chairs (which also have power-adjustable headrest) is butt-kickers.

I saw one of the Star Wars films in a Dolby-equipped theater a few years back and was immediately awestruck by the vibration of the seat during space battle and other action sequences. I had to have that theatrical experience in my home and had subwoofers placed under the chairs. What a difference!
 

Sam Favate

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Nothing beats seeing movies in cinemas and on actual film.. Unfortunately that is almost non -existent today.

Unfortunately this is true. There are no theaters being built anymore, and the ones that are still around are in disrepair (the pandemic made sure that theaters don't have money for renovations).

I was talking with a professional planner the other day and she told me that no one is building theaters. Developers want apartments and warehouses; that's it. They don't feel there is a market for theaters.

There was a great old movie theater in the town next to mine. It was right across the street from the train station. The property was bought by a developer who closed down the theater, but told the town "don't worry, it will be replaced with something great." Four years later, it's still empty, and plans are moving forward for it to be apartments. Developers will say anything to satisfy a town's board.

Meanwhile, our downtowns are all dying. A theater on Main Street is the kind of thing that invites people to come spend the day downtown - go to a movie, have lunch or dinner at a nearby restaurant, maybe do a bit of shopping.

In any case, I'm a strong proponent of physical media and I didn't mean to get the topic off track, but your comment triggered my concerns about streaming leading not only to the demise of physical media but to theaters as well.
 

JediFonger

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just wanna parachute in here and say that even the smallest auditoriums in multiplex has 30FT diagonal that's roughly 360" so unless you can afford real estate that can house a 300+" screen there is still no comparison. in some ways you go primarily for the screen size.

most of the audio experiences leaves a lot to be desired as cinema owners dont wanna maintain... so i've actually heard just straight mono on many ACTION movies. it's a bit frustrating.
 

The Drifter

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To be honest I am older and though I do stream I find that DVD are better. I bought angels had fallen and saw it in blu ray. Next night I found it on Netflick and I could see and hear the difference. I also saw air force one the same way and on DVD the sound was better

Yes, I've also found that DVD's sometimes have better PQ/sound than streaming; and, in all the cases I've seen - Blu's have better PQ/sound than streaming.

Also wanted to echo other posters that I find seeing movies (and TV shows) at home is far better than the theatrical experience - for many reasons.
 

Ronald Epstein

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Unfortunately this is true. There are no theaters being built anymore, and the ones that are still around are in disrepair (the pandemic made sure that theaters don't have money for renovations).

I was talking with a professional planner the other day and she told me that no one is building theaters. Developers want apartments and warehouses; that's it. They don't feel there is a market for theaters.

There was a great old movie theater in the town next to mine. It was right across the street from the train station. The property was bought by a developer who closed down the theater, but told the town "don't worry, it will be replaced with something great." Four years later, it's still empty, and plans are moving forward for it to be apartments. Developers will say anything to satisfy a town's board.

Meanwhile, our downtowns are all dying. A theater on Main Street is the kind of thing that invites people to come spend the day downtown - go to a movie, have lunch or dinner at a nearby restaurant, maybe do a bit of shopping.

In any case, I'm a strong proponent of physical media and I didn't mean to get the topic off track, but your comment triggered my concerns about streaming leading not only to the demise of physical media but to theaters as well.

Hey Sam!

I still wonder how much life theaters have left in them?

Hard to think they will ever go completely away, but due to coronavirus, there has been a huge migration to streaming in the homes and I don't see that situation improving this winter.
 

JediFonger

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Hey Sam!

I still wonder how much life theaters have left in them?

Hard to think they will ever go completely away, but due to coronavirus, there has been a huge migration to streaming in the homes and I don't see that situation improving this winter.

i dont think it'll completely go away, but as was the trend prior to pandemic, audiences are only showing up for larger tentpoles and occasionally indie markets. it'll become more and more specialized and be more like broadway theater.

i can see $50 to $100/person ticket prices and rules like no babies, etc.
 

kalm_traveler

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just wanna parachute in here and say that even the smallest auditoriums in multiplex has 30FT diagonal that's roughly 360" so unless you can afford real estate that can house a 300+" screen there is still no comparison. in some ways you go primarily for the screen size.

most of the audio experiences leaves a lot to be desired as cinema owners dont wanna maintain... so i've actually heard just straight mono on many ACTION movies. it's a bit frustrating.
Can't speak for anyone else, but for me screen size is irrelevant beyond the point where you'd need to be turning your head to see the action. In my case, screen size ideally is relative to seating distance and I prefer the screen to take up enough of my field of vision that I can comfortably see everything without having to move my head at all or gaze much.

In my current setup, I have a 75" TV and sit about 8-9 feet from it which is great. Sort of wish I would have gone with an 85" but definitely any larger than that and I'd need to scoot back which would also mean cutting the ceiling up to move the Atmos speakers farther back as well.

At that point, I'd be questioning the purpose of the larger screen.

But of course to each their own :emoji_thumbsup:
 

JediFonger

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Can't speak for anyone else, but for me screen size is irrelevant beyond the point where you'd need to be turning your head to see the action. In my case, screen size ideally is relative to seating distance and I prefer the screen to take up enough of my field of vision that I can comfortably see everything without having to move my head at all or gaze much.

In my current setup, I have a 75" TV and sit about 8-9 feet from it which is great. Sort of wish I would have gone with an 85" but definitely any larger than that and I'd need to scoot back which would also mean cutting the ceiling up to move the Atmos speakers farther back as well.

At that point, I'd be questioning the purpose of the larger screen.

But of course to each their own :emoji_thumbsup:

for me it's all about immersion and how the stories depicted by the movies are all about larger than life. i mean if you have ever experienced 76FT x 55FT like my local true size IMAX... there is simply no going back.

i was lucky enough to watch 2001 4k remaster for a super limited run like 4-5 days on the same IMAX screen and it was just fantastic... nothing will beat any experiences like films made for the large screen format IN the large screen.

i've got a 100" projection at home and can (at some point) get 120+ screens... but no matter how large i can outfit the screen/room, i dont think i can ever afford to have real estate that can house 300+" screens.

as another illustration, i just watched The Green Knight and while it isn't Bond or any action piece it was a small intimate piece about a quest to grow up and loved every minute of it on the larger screen. watching at home again, is definitely not the same.
 

Worth

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Hey Sam!

I still wonder how much life theaters have left in them?

Hard to think they will ever go completely away, but due to coronavirus, there has been a huge migration to streaming in the homes and I don't see that situation improving this winter.
What happens when it dawns on everybody that streaming isn't actually profitable?
 

ManW_TheUncool

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for me it's all about immersion and how the stories depicted by the movies are all about larger than life. i mean if you have ever experienced 76FT x 55FT like my local true size IMAX... there is simply no going back.

i was lucky enough to watch 2001 4k remaster for a super limited run like 4-5 days on the same IMAX screen and it was just fantastic... nothing will beat any experiences like films made for the large screen format IN the large screen.

i've got a 100" projection at home and can (at some point) get 120+ screens... but no matter how large i can outfit the screen/room, i dont think i can ever afford to have real estate that can house 300+" screens.

as another illustration, i just watched The Green Knight and while it isn't Bond or any action piece it was a small intimate piece about a quest to grow up and loved every minute of it on the larger screen. watching at home again, is definitely not the same.

I agree to an extent... and yes, for that reason, I'm going to see the new Bond flick (and also Dune after that) at the (only) true IMAX theater in NYC -- I also saw the 2001 revival/restoration screening there ~3(?) years ago. But generally, I'm plenty satisfied w/ my 120" faux-K FP setup (from 10-11ft viewing distance) and haven't really seen anything clearly better in local theaters, except the big IMAX at Lincoln Sq.

I tried the new ScreenX setup for Black Widow at a nearby Regal/UA's biggest auditorium (near downtown Brooklyn) and was thoroughly underwhelmed.

_Man_
 

JediFonger

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I agree to an extent... and yes, for that reason, I'm going to see the new Bond flick (and also Dune after that) at the (only) true IMAX theater in NYC -- I also saw the 2001 revival/restoration screening there ~3(?) years ago. But generally, I'm plenty satisfied w/ my 120" faux-K FP setup (from 10-11ft viewing distance) and haven't really seen anything clearly better in local theaters, except the big IMAX at Lincoln Sq.

I tried the new ScreenX setup for Black Widow at a nearby Regal/UA's biggest auditorium (near downtown Brooklyn) and was thoroughly underwhelmed.

_Man_
yeah like i said to each his own i think 360” is larger than 100 or 120” i still go in for pretty any movie if i can swing it.

i mean wes anderson on the big screen!! whew gotta luv all that symmetry!
 

cinemiracle

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Can't speak for anyone else, but for me screen size is irrelevant beyond the point where you'd need to be turning your head to see the action. In my case, screen size ideally is relative to seating distance and I prefer the screen to take up enough of my field of vision that I can comfortably see everything without having to move my head at all or gaze much.

In my current setup, I have a 75" TV and sit about 8-9 feet from it which is great. Sort of wish I would have gone with an 85" but definitely any larger than that and I'd need to scoot back which would also mean cutting the ceiling up to move the Atmos speakers farther back as well.

At that point, I'd be questioning the purpose of the larger screen.

But of course to each their own :emoji_thumbsup:
Some screens sizes are supposed to make you turn your head. Cinerama and Circle -vision are two examples. Shanghai was the only city where I saw Circle-vision in 3-D. Are there any other similar cinemas outside of China with such 3-D cinemas.
 

cinemiracle

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for me it's all about immersion and how the stories depicted by the movies are all about larger than life. i mean if you have ever experienced 76FT x 55FT like my local true size IMAX... there is simply no going back.

i was lucky enough to watch 2001 4k remaster for a super limited run like 4-5 days on the same IMAX screen and it was just fantastic... nothing will beat any experiences like films made for the large screen format IN the large screen.

i've got a 100" projection at home and can (at some point) get 120+ screens... but no matter how large i can outfit the screen/room, i dont think i can ever afford to have real estate that can house 300+" screens.

as another illustration, i just watched The Green Knight and while it isn't Bond or any action piece it was a small intimate piece about a quest to grow up and loved every minute of it on the larger screen. watching at home again, is definitely not the same.
76 ft x 55 ft is very small for an Imax screen. (is that 75ft high or lengthwise ?) Sydney's Imax used to be the biggest in the world but it is closed and being rebuilt .I once managed to spend a few hours in the projection room. Melbourne's Imax is 121 ft x 75ft which was slightly smaller than Sydney's . World's biggest screen now belongs to an Imax cinema in Germany with a screen size of 68 ft high and 124 ft in length. More than half a century ago a drive -in cinema in Los Angeles had a screen which was 130 ft wide. 3-strip Cinerama films were projected onto it.
 

kalm_traveler

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Some screens sizes are supposed to make you turn your head. Cinerama and Circle -vision are two examples. Shanghai was the only city where I saw Circle-vision in 3-D. Are there any other similar cinemas outside of China with such 3-D cinemas.
For sure - I'm not just a fan of having to do that. If the screen is too large to the point where the viewer can't really keep their gaze roughly around the center of the screen and still reasonably see what's going on, it's too big for my preference.
 

ManW_TheUncool

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76 ft x 55 ft is very small for an Imax screen. (is that 75ft high or lengthwise ?) Sydney's Imax used to be the biggest in the world but it is closed and being rebuilt .I once managed to spend a few hours in the projection room. Melbourne's Imax is 121 ft x 75ft which was slightly smaller than Sydney's . World's biggest screen now belongs to an Imax cinema in Germany with a screen size of 68 ft high and 124 ft in length. More than half a century ago a drive -in cinema in Los Angeles had a screen which was 130 ft wide. 3-strip Cinerama films were projected onto it.

Is 76x55ft considered very small for IMAX? No idea.

The one I usually go to in NYC is ~100x80ft. That currently largest one in Germany isn't quite so big for 1.43:1 AR IMAX though since it's shaped more for 1.9:1 -- and it sounds like they're only showing IMAX movies (at least the new Bond flick) cropped to 1.9:1 instead. That's probably great for seeing more standard 70mm films, but debatable for many true IMAX movies intended for 1.43:1.

Anyway, you can probably sit closer to a smaller screen for essentially the same experience... though sitting "too close" to a "very small" screen won't feel the same of course -- and yes, that's certainly the case for HT...

_Man_
 

Suzanne.S

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For many years I didn't go to the theater (other than a 007 opening) due to rude behavior including talking, and cell phone lights. A few years ago, Fathom Events did screenings of Casablanca. Randy surprised me with tickets and I was blown away by the assigned seating, the comfortable recliners and the people who were, on the whole, quiet and behaved.

Since that time, I try to go see the classics when they are shown if I can. If no one goes then no one will show them. Before the pandemic, Marcus Theaters did several series of classics and Disney films. I went to several and I was pleasantly surprised at the Disney showings. I was dreading the behavior of the children in attendance but was pleased and amazed by how well behaved most of the children were.

There is also something special about seeing a movie with an audience. Last night, I was at the Arkadin Cinema, a small outdoor venue that has a capacity of around 40. You bring your own chairs, get a drink from the bar and watch carefully curated films. Last night was a showing of Hitchcock's The Lodger presented by a new initiative called Silents Please, STL. The courtyard was at capacity and the audience loved the film. To me, it was fun to hear the audience reactions to certain scenes. It's interesting to see and hear the reactions. Is it an ideal set up? No, but I can't hear those reactions and have spontaneous conversations about the film with strangers in my living room. For that reason, I will continue to go to screens, particularly of classic or catalog titles.

If I am watching a film for the first time, or watching to write about it or study it further, then I like the quiet and the pause ability at home. I absolutely love my physical media collection because so many obscure things won't be shown in a theater. I feel that there is room for both.
 

John*Wells

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I prefer Physical media because at any time, I Can sit in the privacy of my own home and watch what I want when I feel like it. I Can also watch whatever format I want. If I Dont want 4K or HD Shoved down my throat, I Can pull the SD DVD if I want :laugh: Secondly, like any other utility, my ISP Can go down without notice for hours or even days at a time (and it happened 3 times recently )
 

JediFonger

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For many years I didn't go to the theater (other than a 007 opening) due to rude behavior including talking, and cell phone lights. A few years ago, Fathom Events did screenings of Casablanca. Randy surprised me with tickets and I was blown away by the assigned seating, the comfortable recliners and the people who were, on the whole, quiet and behaved.

Since that time, I try to go see the classics when they are shown if I can. If no one goes then no one will show them. Before the pandemic, Marcus Theaters did several series of classics and Disney films. I went to several and I was pleasantly surprised at the Disney showings. I was dreading the behavior of the children in attendance but was pleased and amazed by how well behaved most of the children were.

There is also something special about seeing a movie with an audience. Last night, I was at the Arkadin Cinema, a small outdoor venue that has a capacity of around 40. You bring your own chairs, get a drink from the bar and watch carefully curated films. Last night was a showing of Hitchcock's The Lodger presented by a new initiative called Silents Please, STL. The courtyard was at capacity and the audience loved the film. To me, it was fun to hear the audience reactions to certain scenes. It's interesting to see and hear the reactions. Is it an ideal set up? No, but I can't hear those reactions and have spontaneous conversations about the film with strangers in my living room. For that reason, I will continue to go to screens, particularly of classic or catalog titles.

If I am watching a film for the first time, or watching to write about it or study it further, then I like the quiet and the pause ability at home. I absolutely love my physical media collection because so many obscure things won't be shown in a theater. I feel that there is room for both.
agreed doesnt have to be one or the other answer can always be all the above

also audiences venturing out to classics in general tend not to be the rude/disruptive ones
 

Santee7

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You know what's funny... the better my home theater becomes, the less I want to actually go to a regular cinema theater because my setup is 'better'. Higher picture quality, clearer and more identifiably-discrete sound, my seats have a power-adjustable headrest and the final nail in the coffin for theaters is that if I watch a movie at home there are zero crying babies or annoying people talking during dialogue.
thats so sadly true, I only went to Alamo Draft house in my area because they were vigilant about both quality of waht they would screen (and they always had extra features) and they were enforcers of "no talk no text"
 

Steven Simon

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I have 4 SVS SuBWoofers in my theater calibrated with Dirac Live! The bass is immersive and I can feel the bass in my sitting position. I have not felt Butt kickers, I am sure it's cool though.... Would love to come over and check that out Ron.... :)
 

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