How do you distinguish film grain from digital artifacts on DVD?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Dave H, Nov 19, 2001.

  1. Dave H

    Dave H Producer

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    If I'm not mistaken, film grain is a bit "thicker" while artifacts blink more and are smaller. Or, is this even true? I'm curious to know the differences and wonder how reviewers know.
     
  2. Jeff D

    Jeff D Supporting Actor

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    I'd say experience.

    You should be able to see the difference. There are many factors for noticing this. The most important in the size of the viewing screen. On a small display you most likely won't see anything.

    Film grain really looks like grains of say sand or something, they are random in posisition, but exist everywhere. If the film is grainy it will show through out.

    If you know any photographers have them show you prints for slow speed and fast speed film. Fast speed film has larger grains and you'll be able to see them on a large enough print.

    Digital artifacts are more random and infrequent. Although they exist everywhere. Encoding is done in a grid of squares 8x8 pixels, you may have seen this with a dirty disc or something. The probem may exist in one part of the frame and only that one block might have a problem.

    Digital artifacts are very obvious in scenes with smoke or fog.

    I'd sum it up as this... grain is constant and digital artifacts are random.
     
  3. Patrick McCart

    Patrick McCart Lead Actor

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    Pixelation (or digital artifacts) looks "squarish" and grain is globular.
     
  4. Mark Zimmer

    Mark Zimmer Producer

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    I'd dispute the notion that grain is constant. Film shot in lower light conditions will be grainier than that shot in higher light conditions. Different film stocks would probably be used in these circumstances. These different stocks could be cut together into the same movie, and thus leave you with some scenes that are grainy, but certainly not all of them, or differing levels of grain.
     
  5. Dave Koch

    Dave Koch Stunt Coordinator

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    I think a good, text-book example of film grain is the party scene at the top of Eyes Wide Shut.
    dave
     
  6. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

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    A textbook of craptastic Super35 and moronic lighting designer induced grain will be the opening of the Harry Potter DVD
     
  7. Holadem

    Holadem Lead Actor

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  8. Jeff D

    Jeff D Supporting Actor

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