How do you bi-wire?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Ryan Cruz, May 6, 2002.

  1. Ryan Cruz

    Ryan Cruz Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks [​IMG]
     
  2. Bob Sheen

    Bob Sheen Stunt Coordinator

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  3. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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  4. Kyle

    Kyle Stunt Coordinator

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    Ok which brings up a question for me. Bi amping.

    I have one 4ohm 18" sub with only one voice coil. but it has 2 post pos and 2 neg. I am running one channel of my old Carver reciever to power it. Can I Bi amp it (by using both channels)without hurting the receiver (amp) or the sub. The Carver is rated at 150 watts per channel, with 2 channels. If the sub channel is mono then would this work? I believe I would get 300watts to the sub. Am I way off base?

    Edited to explain. The posts + and - are connected and cannot be split.
     
  5. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

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    Another quick basic article about the concept can be found in our newbie primer:
    http://www.hometheaterforum.com/htfo...067#post547067
    I'm confused.
    1) Bi amping means something specific (that is different from bi-wiring). This would be sending 2 signals to a cabinet with 2 drivers and keeping the signals discrete from source to destination by using 2 amplifier channels.
    2) It sounds like what you want to do is neither biamping nor biwiring: What it sounds like to me is you have a cabinet with a single driver and you'd like to use both amp channels to drive this single driver. What you are talking about is essentially bridging the amplifier (receiver). In amplifier terms, bridging means connecting the 2 amplifier channel together and provide double power to a single driver... this is what you're basically doing- only with normal bridging you connect the channels at the amp and you're connecting them at the other end.
    My suggestion would be to avoid it. It might be fine- but without more knowledge on the carver receiver and its inner workings- it might not be capible to handling a 4ohm load while bridged without bursting into flame (for ref, although it is a completely different compnay- Carver PM series professional amplifers usually won't bridge at 4ohms).
    If you had an amp that would properly bridge (or the carver is approved for bridging), I would think you could bond the two channels at the speaker end instead of at the amp without issue- I can't honestly say I've ever tried it. I'd maybe look into seeing if that unit can bridge- and go from there.
    -Vince
     
  6. Kyle

    Kyle Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks for the quick reply. I guess it would be bridging the amp. I have done this with amplifiers for car audio before. I don't have the model# of the old carver with me but chances are, it won't work.[​IMG]
     

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