How do I use paint thinner?

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Mark Dubbelboer, Jun 16, 2004.

  1. Mark Dubbelboer

    Mark Dubbelboer Screenwriter

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    So I'm painting the floors at work, and if it sounds like it can't get any worse it can.
    I'm dumb.
    As in, I've got dirty brushes and a dirty roller and I don't know how to clean them.
    I've got some paint thinner but I'm not sure what to do with the stuff. I've used it before, but that was before people cared about things like destroying the environment.
    so my question is, do i just rinse the brushes/roller over the sink? can i do it outside? do i need to keep whatever is left over and discard of it?

    thanks in advance,
    mark
     
  2. Christ Reynolds

    Christ Reynolds Producer

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    just get an old bucket and put some paint thinner in there, and basically just clean the brushes and roller with the paint thinner. your local town may have a recycling center with instructions on what to do with it, but you can always let the pigment settle to the bottom and reuse it. although i doubt a little paint thinner would really hurt anything, unless you pour it on something flammable, creating a fire hazard.

    CJ
     
  3. Mark Dubbelboer

    Mark Dubbelboer Screenwriter

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    cool
    i'll go get a bucket and leave it there until tomorrow when i can ask someone else. i didn't think it was a big deal but didn't want to pull an environmental faux pas.
     
  4. Joseph DeMartino

    Joseph DeMartino Lead Actor

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    The answer to your question is "Not as a beverage" [​IMG]

    Actually, it depends on what kind of paint you're using. I'd call the local home improvement superstore or paint store and ask what they recommend for the paint you're using.

    Joe
     
  5. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

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    you pour a little on a rag, place rag in a plastic bag, place bag over nose and mouth and breathe.
     
  6. DonnyD

    DonnyD Screenwriter

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    According to which "paint thinner you're using..... Most of the time, paint thinners are mineral spirits which are useful on a lot of things. I'm hoping you're not using any of the others such as xylol, laquer thinner, etc since they are so so so flammable and can be dangerous.

    Why not try to use some water soluable paints so you can clean up with soap and water? There's several versions on the market that do a good job. BUT, if your stuck with using an oil based product, you're also stuck with mineral spirits.......Use 2 buckets.... the first to get the majority of the paint out of the brush, the second as a cleaner rinse.... but after cleaning your brushes, use warm soapy water to remove paint thinner residue.

    Good luck.... but if you've waited around for an answer to this thread, throw the brushes away and start over. Hope you haven't spent much on brushes!
     
  7. Jeff Gatie

    Jeff Gatie Lead Actor

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    First things first. Are you using latex paint? If you are, the only "paint thinner" you need is tap water. Use real paint thinner on latex paint and you end up with a big mess.
     
  8. Mark Dubbelboer

    Mark Dubbelboer Screenwriter

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    well, it has been confirmed.
    even after following the advice of the kind folk of the htf i am a hopeless case.
    the thing is, i'm not buying the paint, i'm not buying the brushes, and i'm not buying the paint thinner. in fact, i work for a pretty large company who has a pretty large budget and was actually told to just chuck the brushes at the end of the day and get new ones. but being the half dutch person i am (see last name) I decided I'd try to save the same brushes over the period I was painting.
    so i got a bucket, poured some paint thinner in it and cleaned the brushes (or so i thought). i got in to work today and the thing was rock hard. so i ended up chucking it anyway.

    now i've got 2 more hours until i'm going home and i'm determined to get it right this time. i'm going to pour more of the paint thinner in the bucket, and i'm going to tie a garbage bag around them tightly or something to try to stop them from drying out.

    the paint reads "alkyly enamel" and it's for "industrial use only" i have no idea how this is different than normal paint. as can be seen from this thread i'm not exactly an avid painter.

    the paint thinner reads "recordsol Paint Thinner" it says it's an economical alternative to turpentine. and on the warning label it mentions the mineral sprites (sounds like something out of final fantay)

    so unless i hear otherwise from you intelligent folk i'll just try again.

    thanks everyone,
    mark
     
  9. Wayne Ernst

    Wayne Ernst Cinematographer

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    That's definately an oil-based paint. I'll suggest the following:

    1) Soak the brushes in the thinner for approx. 30 minutes.
    2) Purchase a brush "comb" from a paint store - they are only about $3.00.
    3) Use the comb to properly clean the bristles. A comb is essentially the only thing that will clean the bristles properly.
    4) Once the paint has been removed properly from the bristles, take the brushes outside and tightly hold the handle while you thrust the brush in a downward motion to force the remaining liquids out of the bristles.
    5) You could then take a cloth and dry the bristles a bit more.
    6) Use the brush comb again to "groom" the bristles so the brush is ready for you the next time you need it.
     
  10. Christ Reynolds

    Christ Reynolds Producer

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    another good way to get the liquid out of the brush is, if you're wearing boots, tip one of your feet up on its heel (while still standing) and hit your boot with the non-bristle part of the brush while holding the handle, thin side of course. the chunkier your boots, the harder you can hit the brush. this works well if you dont have any cloth around to dry the brush.

    CJ
     

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