How do I Isolate Low Bass from rest of house?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Billy Gun, Nov 30, 2001.

  1. Billy Gun

    Billy Gun Stunt Coordinator

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    I am building a theater in my basement and want to isolate the Low bass (20 hertz region.) from the rest of the house..........any Ideas?

    I want to build a room within the room but what are some inexpensive methods to add a tremendous amount of density to the walls/ceilings at a reasonable price?
     
  2. John-Miles

    John-Miles Screenwriter

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    Im not sure you are necesairly looking for density, if you want to create a sound barrier at least. things liek particle board are quite dense, but do they stop noise? not really infact sound travels faster through denser mediums. That is why things liek ear plugs are made of soft foam, if they were solid metal or somethign they would help the sound more than impede it. as well keep in mind sound canot travel ina vaccum... so i guess if you have more money than god you could try to build walls and create a vaccum in between.... but personally I would look at adding afew studs along your walls, then putting up some drywall, and injecting foam into the space. its certainly not a 5 dollar fix, but im pretty sure it could do the job and keep you toasty warm in the winter. barring that there are alwas les appealing options like carpetign your walls and such. really there are alot of things that would work, if you dont plan on doing the work yourself ask a few general contractors to take a look at it and make a suggestion. odds are they would ahve done similar things in other places.
     
  3. Mac F

    Mac F Agent

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    a lot of low bass is through direct contact: the sheetrock in the room vibrates, it is connected to the studs which then start to vibrate, this makes the sheetrock on the other side of the wall vibrate which recreates the original sound in the next room. The idea is to break up any direct mechanical linkage to the next room, such as using staggered studs or "resilent channel" between the sheetrock and the studs. I suppose some variation of this could be used for a ceiling.
     
  4. Billy Gun

    Billy Gun Stunt Coordinator

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    Denser walls like concrete block would be needed to stop or at least minimize 20 hz bass......right?
     
  5. John-Miles

    John-Miles Screenwriter

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    sound loses something in the transition between mediums, thats why people use carpeting and foam and such for cheap soundproofing. if you used a very porous concrete that might work, but it would look like crap and you would have little strength in it and it would likely cost you alot to get someone to pour a wall like that. I still think foam is your best bet to cut down on this problem.

    Cheers

    John
     

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