How do I determine proper price for used hardware?

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Steven Larson, Jul 25, 2004.

  1. Steven Larson

    Steven Larson Stunt Coordinator

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    Hello,

    I didn't think it was appropriate to post this question in the used hardware forum. I have a slightly used Pioneer VSX-D711 receiver that I would like to sell. I replaced it with a Harman-Kardon receiver. I don't want to have to buy a pricing guide for one piece of equipment.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated!

    Steve
     
  2. Kirk Gunn

    Kirk Gunn Screenwriter

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    Check audiogon.com as a reference point. Tons of stuff...

    Good luck
     
  3. Garrett Lundy

    Garrett Lundy Producer

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    Put it on Ebay, Then "the market will pay what the market will pay".

    I honestly think Ebay is the greatest thing to happen to resale since standardised money. Yeah, you got a few assholes, but you get a global market for anything and everything, and stuff is always worth exactly what a person will pay for it.
     
  4. Steven Larson

    Steven Larson Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks guys! I will check out audiogon.com. I was planning to sell on ebay, but I wanted to have an idea for a reserve price.

    Steve
     
  5. Leila Dougan

    Leila Dougan Screenwriter

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    Watch the auctions for a week and see what the average sale price is. Pay attention to when the auction ends as well since an auction that ends Tuesday at 3am will generally fetch a lower price than those at Saturday at 3pm.

    Once you know what they are selling for, decide for yourself what's the minimum you'd accept. Set that amount as your reserve. This is especially true if your auction will be one of those that end at 3am. You don't want to end up screwing yourself [​IMG]
     
  6. Malcolm R

    Malcolm R Executive Producer

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    Don't play the reserve game. Just decide what your minimum acceptable amount is and set that as your starting bid.

    I refuse to bid on reserve price auctions. Just tell me how much you want. I'll pay it or I won't.
     
  7. JamesCB

    JamesCB Second Unit

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    There is a service called Orion Blue Book . It is similar to how vehicles are sold referecncing their "blue book value. There is a slight fee depending on how many items you want to look up. Going through ads and auctions is a real guessing game, if you can even find the same or similar item you need a price for.

    Good luck,
    James

    PS. Many audio dealers carry a subscrption to this service, and may have the book version on hand. My dealer lets me look stuff up when I need to.
     
  8. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

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    took the words right out of my mouth.
    you can also do a search on ebay for "completed items" and see what they've been selling for lately, I looked quickly and I'd expect to get around $100 for it. One sold at $78, and another sold at $140, but the majority are right around $100
     
  9. DaveGTP

    DaveGTP Cinematographer

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    Good advice. Many people shy away from reserve auctions. Just list it at that minimum and see if you get a bidder. Best way to sell something. Same effect, but you'll more likely get more bidders than if it had a reserve. Plus, you save yourself the extra fee for the reserve.
     
  10. Don Black

    Don Black Screenwriter

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    I disagree. Reserve prices generate interest from more people than they turn off. The idea of "getting a deal" is a powerful one. Just don't set an unrealistic reserve price...

    An easy experiment is to setup two auctions: one with a reserve and one without. And then watch the number of people who themselves are "watching" your auction. My experience has been that the reserve-priced auctions will generate more interest.
     
  11. Malcolm R

    Malcolm R Executive Producer

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    Yeah, because people keep checking back to see if some other sucker has tripped the reserve price so that they now actually have a real number to consider bidding against.

    Put up a real number from the start and you can have people actually bidding on the item instead of just watching it.
     
  12. DaveGTP

    DaveGTP Cinematographer

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    If you do some checking, you'll find that the all the Ebay tips and tricks websites, sellers, etc advise against reserve auctions, for the most part.

    Most people will not bother to watch an auction, just to find out the minimum bid is way too high. I don't even bother to watch them, myself. What's the point in the work if the person could have some silly high price for the minimum?
     
  13. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

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    I also belong to the "start it at $1 with a reserve" camp.
    if nothing else it's cheaper, a higher starting bid costs more in listing fees.

    What I REALLY love about ebay is when you see an item with a $50 minimum bid, a $75 buy it now, and the item ends up selling for something like $85
     
  14. EugeneR

    EugeneR Second Unit

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    I'm in the "start at $1 witn NO reserve" camp. Unless it is an item that is very unusual and there is no market for it (virtually never happens with electronic equipment), you will get LOTS of interest and lots of bidders, not just watchers. If you ever really pay attention to auctions from the beginning and look at winning bids, the items that will nearly always sell highest are the items which start out cheapest. Lots of people notice right away, bid, and then you got yourself a hot auction that has a ton of bids when people look at the page with a list of auctions. That alone attracts attention. My $1 auctions usually end well above the price I would've set as reserve, and I have not yet been burned by having to sell an item for less than it was worth.

    The only reason to sell with a reserve is if you want to sell for less-or not sell at all.
     
  15. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

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    So you're going to put a car on ebay that books at say, 11,500 with no reserve and let it sell for 9500?
    I doubt it
     
  16. Malcolm R

    Malcolm R Executive Producer

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    No, if you want book value, you start the auction at $11,500. Why waste everyone's time by playing silly reserve games?
     
  17. DaveGTP

    DaveGTP Cinematographer

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    From pcmagazine's top 10 Ebay tips:




    You know you're not going to get a deal on a reserve auction. Unless the seller is an idiot, or 100% not greedy, they've set the reserve bid to a reasonable market price. The whole point of a deal is to get under market price. Plus, there are a lot of bidders that set unrealistic reserve prices.


    A reserve price tells me, the seller wants to sell, but

    A) Is looking to make a handsome profit
    B) Only wants to sell if they get decent money for it (aka they don't know the market value), otherwise, they are keeping it

    I want a LOWER price than either if I am going the Ebay route.


    Plus, if the item doesn't sell, you get charged a fee (like 1% of the reserve price, I believe).



    And the start the auction at $1 thing works well. You should get market price for it (or close to it). But obviously you wouldn't do it for a car. That's a bad example to use on Ebay. Most people are still leery of spending big $$ on Ebay - especially for something like a car.
     
  18. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

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    Then why are you bothering with ebay at all?
    A reserve isn't a problem if you know what you're willing to pay for an item
     
  19. DaveGTP

    DaveGTP Cinematographer

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    I guess starting this month, Ebay is stopping reserve auctions at their Australian site.

     
  20. Don Black

    Don Black Screenwriter

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    I've never done anything but reserve-priced auctions and everything I've sold has done very well. Sure, if I'm a buyer I might not like reserve auctions. But as a seller, I'm not trying to give buyers a deal. I'm trying to get the best price I can for my wares.

    As long as your feedback rating is good and your product is in demand, you won't have any problems with reserve auctions as a seller. Demand drives the market and there is a demand for auctions: reserve or no reserve.
     

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