How do I clean and "iron" a silk tie?

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Don Black, Feb 23, 2004.

  1. Don Black

    Don Black Screenwriter

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    So I've got a few Brooks Brothers ties that have become wrinkled over the years. How can I iron and clean them? My dry cleaner has all sorts of warning on his price list about silk ties being "at customer's risk only" which has me concerned.

    Any suggestions from the sartorially inclined?

    Thanks.
     
  2. Patrick_S

    Patrick_S Producer
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    Your best bet is still probably the dry cleaners.
     
  3. Scott_lb

    Scott_lb Supporting Actor

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    Two options: First, you can get them dry-cleaned (as stated in a previous post). Second, you can use a pressing cloth. Basically, you take this goofy lookin' cloth and place it on top of the material and then iron over it. That way, the tie won't get burned by the hot iron as the cloth absorbs most of the heat and moisture. If it's a really nice tie (or one of your favorites), I wouldn't risk it and take it to the cleaners. Plus, I don't think most dry cleaning operations charge much for ties.
     
  4. Don Black

    Don Black Screenwriter

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    Thanks guys. I, of course, have no problem having them dry-cleaned. I'm just concerned of the dry-cleaner's warning which I remember reading about in the past.
     
  5. Tony Whalen

    Tony Whalen Producer

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    Find another dry-cleaner? [​IMG]

    I've never had a problem getting silk ties done at my dry cleaner. I also don't recall them having a policy like that one, but I could be wrong...
     
  6. Mark Paquette

    Mark Paquette Supporting Actor

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    I'm tossing my vote in for the dry cleaner as well. I bet if you dug deep enough into the fine print, they are not responsible for anything that happens to anything they dry clean. Having said that, I've never had a problem getting any of my suits or ties dry cleaned.
     
  7. ChuckSolo

    ChuckSolo Screenwriter

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    Before I became the MIS director at my current employer, I owned a drycleaning plant for 23 years. Silk ties are usually done "at your own risk" by a drycleaners because of the inability of dyes to remain stable on the silk cloth, especially reds. Any type of moisture that is introduced to the cloth, especially during spotting, will cause the dyes to bleed. Also, silk ties, because of the thinness of the fabric, the material used to add shape to the tie can become twisted and can rarely be returned to its original shape. Most ties, especially silk ties, are done in a batch by themselves in special mesh bags and with the dry cleaning machine set to agitate the garments very, very slightly. As for pressing a silk tie, a silk tie should only be pressed using a pressing cloth and with DRY heat, as steam can also cause the dyes to bleed. BTW - Any reputable drycleaner should not ask for a "waiver of non-responsibility" to be signed by the customer or have signs posted saying they are not responsible for certain types of garments. The only exception to this would be certain types of buttons and bows and fake leather/suede trim. Along the same lines as silks ties, are Angora sweaters, which can shrink to half their size if cleaned by a drycleaner who does not know what he/she is doing. Because Angora is rabbit fur mixed in with wool yarn, the rabitt fur is subject to compaction during the cleaning cycle due to agitation. Angora garments should be cleaned with minimal agitation, just like silk ties.
     
  8. Don Black

    Don Black Screenwriter

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    Thanks Chuck. Very helpful info.
     
  9. Tony Whalen

    Tony Whalen Producer

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    Good info to know! Thanks Chuck! [​IMG]
     
  10. ChuckSolo

    ChuckSolo Screenwriter

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    No problem. If you have any more garment care questions, don't hesitate to ask.[​IMG]
     
  11. Don Black

    Don Black Screenwriter

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    Do you mix areas of expertise? So, if I wanted to hook-up a washing machine to a T-1 line for example? [​IMG]
     
  12. ChuckSolo

    ChuckSolo Screenwriter

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    UM......actually no, but the day is coming when you will be able to wire your fridge and stove to the Internet. Your fridge will use Windows to notify you and your local food mart if you are low on eggs, chees, milk, etc. And your stove will supply the latest recipes off the 'net. As an IT professional, I see these uses for technology as most unnecessary, superfluous. God save us from the marketing guys who still think the Internet is "really neat!" Ask any IT pro and he will probably tell you that as a tool the 'net is indeed "neat" and nowadays pretty much essential for us tech heads to do our jobs, but I personally don't think I will ever have use for Internet ready kitchens or bathrooms. To tell you the truth, I rarely even turn on my home PC. When I get home I wanna relax, enjoy my HT and forget about networks, PCs, IP protocals, routers and everything else "techie."[​IMG]
     

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