How come I have both grey and black bars?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Dan Kolacz, Apr 15, 2002.

  1. Dan Kolacz

    Dan Kolacz Stunt Coordinator

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    I know this has probably been covered before, I tried searching, but did not come up with the answer I was looking for.

    I just got a new 4:3 Sony 61" delivered today. I only played around with it for about 10 minutes before having to leave for work.

    I noticed that when I set my DVD player to 16:9 mode and the TV's 16:9 mode set to AUTO, I get 2 sets of bars. Very simple depiction below:

    BLACK BARS

    GREY BARS

    Picture

    Picture

    Picture

    Picture

    GREY BARS

    BLACK BARS

    Is this normal?

    Thanks
     
  2. Philip____S

    Philip____S Stunt Coordinator

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    I can't think of an explanation for you're seeing, but the following makes sense to me:

    GREY BARS

    BLACK BARS

    Picture

    Picture

    Picture

    Picture

    BLACK BARS

    GREY BARS

    I could see this as a result of squeezing an image (which creates grey bars) that is letterboxed (which has black bars). I'm not that familiar with Sony's though, maybe it has black bars for squeezing. The grey bars wouldn't make sense though, unless the DVD player is also squeezing and then putting the grey bars in.
     
  3. Jeff Ulmer

    Jeff Ulmer Producer

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    I'm assuming by grey you mean lighter than black, not midtone grey. If this is the case the problem is calibration. If you are watching a 2.35:1 film, there will be bars in the image directly above and below the picture, and above and below those will be the bars generated by your TV (smaller bars will be present on true 1.85:1 images). If your set isn't calibrated correctly these will be different in color. Properly calibrated both should be the same color black, and the transition should be invisible.
     
  4. Yohan Pamudji

    Yohan Pamudji Second Unit

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    Patti,

    I think the black bars you're seeing are a result of the 16:9 squeeze that the TV set employs, and the "grey" (maybe that's not the most accurate description of the color?) bars are encoded in the DVD. What movie were you watching? Was the movie's aspect ratio greater than 1.78:1? If so, that's probably why. Try a movie that has a 1.78:1 aspect ratio like Shrek and see if you still encounter those grey bars.
     
  5. Rich Malloy

    Rich Malloy Producer

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    I'm fairly sure Jeff is correct, Patti. If you haven't calibrated your tv with a disc like "Video Essentials" or "Avia", then it almost certainly has the brightness and contrast set way too high (not to mention the sharpness, which is likely set at dangerous, burn-in inducing levels).

    A properly calibrated set will produce a true black (or nearly so), not the grey that you're seeing in the margins of your 16x9 window.
     
  6. Dan Kolacz

    Dan Kolacz Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks, I am going to go through Avia tonight
     
  7. RyanDinan

    RyanDinan Stunt Coordinator

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    Hi Patti,

    Your brightness is simply up too high, which is producing a "grey" black, instead of a "black" black.

    The black areas above these "grey" bars are caused by the 16x9 squeeze of the set - They are so black because there is nothing being scanned in those areas, since the raster (scanned area of CRT face) is now "squeezed" into a 16x9 area. However, "video black" is still scanned within the raster - If the brightness control is set properly, you should see true black - If it's set too high, you'll see some shade of gray. You don't want to reduce brightness to the point of swallowing detail that's supposed to be seen, and you don't want to raise it to the point of having your image on a pedastal of gray.

    -Ryan Dinan
     

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