How can one have "too much bass"?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Mike LS, Aug 18, 2001.

  1. Mike LS

    Mike LS Supporting Actor

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    How can someone say that a sub puts out too much bass for their room?
    I see these posts scattered over different forums....especially in the "sale" forums....even here in the hardware for sale area.
    The post will read...."selling SVS....it's just too much bass for my room"
    Can this not be solved by simply lowering the level of the sub? My SVS has put out too much bass for my tastes at times (while setting up), so I simply turned the gain on the amp down. Problem solved.
    I know a sub can put out more bass than you might want, but don't most of us strive for overkill? Tastes change as do HT rooms from time to time. Seems like most would like to have more than they really "need" so they won't have to upgrade if they ever move their system into a bigger room.
     
  2. Jack Gilvey

    Jack Gilvey Producer

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    I suppose it's possible that folks who's smallish rooms are very "tight", and have a lot of room-gain, are experiencing a rising response from 30Hz on down, as they would with any sub that's designed to be "flat" down as low as the SVS's are. Just a guess.
    I'd consider that a bonus, and just turn it down myself. An even better solution would be to introduce a roll-off via an EQ at those low frequencies. That would reduce the load on the sub so much you'd have more headroom than you'd know what to do with, and still be as flat as you'd want.
    [Edited last by Jack Gilvey on August 18, 2001 at 01:33 PM]
     
  3. Joe McKeown

    Joe McKeown Stunt Coordinator

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    I am a firm believer that any given speaker has a minimum volume for acceptable output. (And I suppose this extends to subs.) Now, My ears are not so fine tuned that I can hear the difference between Monster and Radio Shack cabling. But I can hear this difference.
    When my family is asleep and I want to watch a movie; I need to keep it quiet. At "Do not Disturb" volumes my TV's speakers sound much better than my reciever.
    Now maybe it is because my reciever or my speakers are not of sufficient quality to handle "quiet" but from a physics standpoint it seems to make sence that speakers would have a minimum power rating. I mean if you need bigger speakers to push more air at higher volumes; wouldn't it make sence that you need smaller speakers to push less air at lower volumes?
    Any way that was my way too long description of why "turning it down" might not be the answer...
     
  4. RicP

    RicP Screenwriter

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    Turning down the gain will not work.
    When you turn down the gain you are lowering the output of the sub across all frequencies. The problem of course is that the way that a room is designed may cause a +6db lift in the 20Hz-40Hz range but not above 60Hz.
    So the bass above 60Hz sounds great, but the bass below 60Hz sounds Godawful and boomy. Finding a completely different location for the sub is the only solution in that case, and that's not always feasible.
    The room has just as much affect on bass response as the subwoofer itself. That's how there can be "too much bass". [​IMG]
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  5. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    And the logical extension of Ric's post is to get a sub that has less volume at lower frequencies than an SVS. In this situation a sub that rolls off at 35Hz may perform better in a room than an SVS. It won't be scientifically perfect like you'd be able to achieve with an EQ, but it will be better sounding. This is partially why I'm perfectly happy with my little ProSub 100. I'm not big on overpowering bass myself.
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