How bad is Running for your knees?

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Scott L, Apr 11, 2005.

  1. Scott L

    Scott L Producer

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    I do it 2-3x a week on a treadmill, around 2 miles each time. I notice sometimes my knees give me minor pains, so I wait an extra day before running again.

    Should I consider those eliptical machines at my gym to prevent using a cane when I'm 60? Or by that time will they replace our legs with Segways?
     
  2. NickSo

    NickSo Producer

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    What kind of running shoes do you have? I'd suggest investing in a decent pair (Asics or New Balance) if the ones you have now are not providing enough cushioning, or have been used for so long the EVA midsole has no more cushinong.
     
  3. Joe Szott

    Joe Szott Screenwriter

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    You know, it varies from person to person and many other factors (shoes, long distances, your running technique.) Pretty much a good rule of thumb is that if you are experiencing discomfort or pain something is incorrect for you. Adding elipticals once a week in lieu of treadmill is a really good idea, not only from as a rest for your knees but as a decent cross-training aproach.

    Also, it's personal but I really don't care for treadmills. The cushioning of the tread makes it hard to monitor how hard you are banging yuor feet against it and that can lead to pain/injuries. If you can find a track or trail to run on you can listen to your feet and adjust your stride and technique to avoid that 'slapping' noise. That's the best way (I know of) to improve your technique to avoid undue joint banging and strain. It's hard to do that on a treadmill that is padded and making noise of it's own.

    Also, you can do some leg weight lifting once a week to strengthen your quads and protect the knee. Leg extentions are great for this purpose, I guarantee you any gym has at least one leg extention machine somewhere.
     
  4. Mary M S

    Mary M S Screenwriter

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    To the great advice given I will add what my Brother-I-L encountered. He was x-military used to jogging most of his life and had knee surgery a couple of years ago. He’s a commercial airline pilot now and knees are important when on rudders. His orthopedic surgeon stated the bulk of his surgeries are preformed on, ‘joggers’ who are in their mid-life years. And that in his practice; the damage caused by this form of exercise creates the need for interventions at a higher rate than any other category of cause, (other than geriatric problems.) This surgeon stated he sees so much of it, he recommends against jogging for anyone. He told the B-I-L it adds too much additional stress to the joints ligaments than is necessary and the damage is cumulative over the years. He considers it unnecessary risk, especially when factoring that the same benefits can be found by switching jogging to walking (fast) in this category of fitness, with far less wear and tear on knees.

    Each has to decide for themselves, but the above is an opinion (the man who repairs this kind of damage) worth factoring.

    It is not as ‘macho’ to walk briskly down the path, as to go dashing by, but possibly far better for your long term mobility range if intending to live to a ripe age.

    I raaaaaaaaan everywhere as a kid, but stopped it as an adult, I felt the stress it put on the bones of the feet/ankles/knees/ and shins and thought why abuse what I want to work like a well-oiled tool? Since about 16, I prefer the fast walk.

    Last 5 years I’m stuck sitting in front of paperwork, I feel it. I am turning over a new leaf this year, I miss my old agility and ease of body, which only comes from constant movement and exercise (of one form or another).
     
  5. Joe Szott

    Joe Szott Screenwriter

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    Yeah, Mary is right there as well. Fast walking is just as good as jogging for exercise if you keep the pace up and go for extended distances/times. Just pay attention to your feet and make sure you aren't 'slapping' the ground with your feet like when running.

    My problem is that every time I fast walk, I end up forgetting what I was doing and start strolling. When I jog, I'm forced to keep the pace fairly steady. Definitely a mental thing for me [​IMG]
     
  6. Sami Kallio

    Sami Kallio Screenwriter

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    If you have an access to a pool, exercising in water is very friendly to your joints and VERY effective.
     
  7. mark alan

    mark alan Supporting Actor

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    I use a recombinant bike at home. no strain and perfectly quiet (so you can watch movies[​IMG] )
     
  8. MarkMel

    MarkMel Screenwriter

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    I have degenerative cartilage in both of my knees. I used to be in track in HS. Since I can't run anymore I took up racing bicycles. Road racing and riding is so much more fun than running, you go farther and faster. It is a lifetime sport.
     
  9. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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    I've been experimenting with bouncing a basketball while I do my walking/jogging. Since it can get tough to bounce a ball for a long time, having the basketball around limits my urge to run/sprint at times.
     
  10. MarkHastings

    MarkHastings Executive Producer

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    I agree. Running may be good physical activity, but the harsh effects on the body are not worth any ammount of good that you get out of it.

    And for women, running is REALLY bad. The jolting that the body takes (in the lower regions) can actually create massive damage to those wishing to get pregnant later on (as well as other uterine damage).
     
  11. John Spencer

    John Spencer Supporting Actor

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    That depends. How far ahead of you are your knees?



    Sorry, couldn't resist. [​IMG]
     
  12. Scott L

    Scott L Producer

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    [​IMG]

    I heard New Balance 840's are one of the best shoes to run in. Asics have more padding but are heavier. I'm a pretty light guy (142lbs) so when I get around to it I'll upgrade my kicks with the new hotness.
     
  13. D. Scott MacDonald

    D. Scott MacDonald Supporting Actor

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    I did know that Asics were so highly regarded. I've owned one pair and my wife owned two, and after a while just wearing them would make our feet go numb.
     
  14. NickSo

    NickSo Producer

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    The higher end asics are very highly regarded, they do make some low end shoes that aren't anywhere near as good as their upper models...

    I have a pair of New Balance 1220's I won from a product camp when i worked for a local sporting goods store... its amazing how much cushioning high end running shoes have compared to regular cross trainers/runners...
     
  15. Bryan X

    Bryan X Producer

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    I wear the Asics Gel Kayano XI. Great shoe, but before you buy a running shoe it's important that you know your foot biomechanics. Normal pronator? Overpronator? Underpronator? Also, what is your arch like?

    Your foot biomechanics can determine the type of shoe you should wear, whether it be a stability shoe, a motion-control shoe, or a cushioned shoe.

    A good running shoe store can do this analysis for you, or you can possibly determine your foot biomechanics yourself. It's not always easy to self-diagnose however.

    As others have said, running can be hard on your knees. When your foot strikes the ground it does so with the force of 2 - 3 times your body weight.

    But if you enjoy running, don't let the fear stop you. Get a good pair of shoes and just be smart about running. If possible, run on dirt and not concrete or pavement as packed dirt is much more forgiving on your joints.

    Running is very rewarding. Check out www.runnersworld.com as they have a great 'shoes & gear' section with some great information.
     
  16. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    Running/jogging is a lot of fun but it's hell on your knees. I jogged on and off for about 15 years or so, now I can't any more because my left knee is damaged. I don't want to face surgery so I use a brace and steer clear of jarring excersize. I bought a bicycle and walk my dog a lot.
     
  17. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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    The thing that I hate about running on dirt or grass is the uneven terrain, and getting twisted ankles from running on dirt/grass.
     
  18. D. Scott MacDonald

    D. Scott MacDonald Supporting Actor

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    My experience was with a fairly expensive pair of Asics Gel Kayano, and I found them to be extremely uncomfortable for my foot type (simply wearing them while sitting down made my feet numb). The store that sold them to me did some sort of pseudo analysis on my gate and pressure points before they sold me the shoe. Eventually I went to a better store and they recommended something that was much more suited for me.

    The moral is to not simply buy a shoe based on brand name recognition, and make sure that you go to a store that specializes in running (it probably won't be a well named chain store found at your typical mall).
     
  19. Bryan X

    Bryan X Producer

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    Exactly. Too often people think a shoe is a shoe is a shoe. They aren't. And the problem is, it's unlikely you'll be able to tell what foot type and biomechanics a particular shoe is for by looking at the box/display/or at the store. Once you know what type of shoe you need, it really pays to do some research online or to consult a knowledgable person at a specialized running shoe store.
     
  20. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    I third that recommendation.

    Also different companies implement different general "foot profiles" in their shoes. Kind of like motorcycle helmets, if you're familiar with them, the main two big brands are Arai and Shoei, and it's common to hear people say they have an "Arai head" or a "Shoei head". Running shoes are kind of like that, too. I have Addidas feet.
     

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