How About Grace Kelly's Film Debut .... 1951's "Fourteen Hours" ?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by David Von Pein, Apr 30, 2002.

  1. David Von Pein

    David Von Pein Producer

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    I can't even find this film on VHS. [​IMG]
    Who wants a DVD of "Fourteen Hours", featuring Richard Basehart, Barbara Bel Geddes, Agnes Moorehead, and the fabulous Miss Kelly (in her first picture)?!
    Who else has seen this very good film?
    http://us.imdb.com/Title?0043560
     
  2. Jeff_HR

    Jeff_HR Producer

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    I saw it on AMC I think a few years ago. A nice little film. I'd buy it on DVD(I don't mind B&W movies--as opposed to some younger viewers who would not watch a B&W movie to save their lives!).
     
  3. David Von Pein

    David Von Pein Producer

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    Thanks Jeff for your view on this nice picture.
    I agree....B&W is not to be avoided at all! In fact, I prefer it for many films. One being: The Haunting (orig. 1963 film, discussed in another thread on this forum).
    I can't imagine The Haunting, or Psycho (orig.) in COLOR! "Glorious B&W" is the only way for these films to be viewed!
    AM I RIGHT?? Of course!! [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
  4. Jeff_HR

    Jeff_HR Producer

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    A good example is how badly the color remake of Psycho did. Too bad The Haunting is not available on DVD yet. I'll just have to keep my LD.
     
  5. David Von Pein

    David Von Pein Producer

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  6. David Von Pein

    David Von Pein Producer

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    Another good (and pretty eerie) TV film I'd love on DVD is 1976's "Helter Skelter" (Steve Railsback/George DiCenzo).

    Who else would buy that one!?
     
  7. Mark Pfeiffer

    Mark Pfeiffer Screenwriter

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    Interested in Fourteen Hours (and any other Grace Kelly films for that matter). I think Paramount owns the rights to several of them.
     
  8. Jeff_HR

    Jeff_HR Producer

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    Helter Skelter is a film I would buy on DVD in a minute. I had a off-the-air Betamax taping of it for years, but alas, that tape is no more. I have not had a chance to tape it since.
     
  9. David Von Pein

    David Von Pein Producer

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    I hear ya, Jeff HR!!

    I've got a fuzzy off-the-network tape myself (about a fifth generation actually).

    Would love at least a 1st G. VHS!

    I thought Railsback was the image of Manson in H.S.! Very creepy, with a good music score too.
     
  10. Jeff_HR

    Jeff_HR Producer

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    Yes, Railsback does have an eerie resemblance to Charlie. Oh well, hope lives eternal!
     
  11. Roderick Gauci

    Roderick Gauci Stunt Coordinator

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    I had watched FOURTEEN HOURS on Italian TV many years ago. It is a highly-regarded suspense thriller and is among the best films of action director Henry Hathaway. It was a typical post-war production from Twentieth Century Fox with gritty on-location shooting and the emphasis on realism.

    It would be great to have this film on DVD and there are several other Forties/Fifties thrillers that have yet to see the light of day in this format: Otto Preminger's LAURA (1944), FALLEN ANGEL (1945) and WHERE THE SIDEWALK ENDS (1950); Hathaway's own THE HOUSE ON 92ND STREET (1945), THE DARK CORNER (1946), KISS OF DEATH (1947) and CALL NORTHSIDE 777 (1948); Elia Kazan's BOOMERANG (1947) and PANIC IN THE STREETS (1950); Robert Siodmak's CRY OF THE CITY (1948); Jules Dassin's British-made NIGHT AND THE CITY (1950); Joseph L. Mankiewicz's FIVE FINGERS (1952), a different sort of suspenser based on a true WWII incident; and Samuel Fuller's PICKUP ON SOUTH STREET (1953) and HOUSE OF BAMBOO (1955).

    Let's hope Fox realizes that films such as these (and others that I may have missed) ARE wanted on DVD and that, hopefully, some thoughtful supplements may be provided as well for the better films among them.

    And this goes for other studios as well: Universal, for example, owns the rights to PHANTOM LADY (1944), THE SUSPECT (1944), THE KILLERS (1946 and 1964), CRISS CROSS (1949) and THE SLEEPING CITY (1950). They should also release their own versions of Billy Wilder's DOUBLE INDEMNITY (a Paramount title now owned by Universal) and Jules Dassin's BRUTE FORCE (1947) and THE NAKED CITY (1948) - the Image discs of all three are said to be barely adequate.
     

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