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Hot Dogs & Coney Island (Chili) Dogs (1 Viewer)

Mysto

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You guys that don't want chili on hot dogs probably don't like White Castle sliders at 3 a.m. after a night of drinking either.:D And besides as I explained - it's not really chili it is coney sauce. Every restaurant has it's own unique secret recipe.

From the Detroit Historical Society Website
"While no one place can definitively claim to be the birthplace of the Coney dog, Michigan, by sheer volume and duration of its Coney restaurants, makes a strong bid. Detroit’s famous Coney dog restaurants, American Coney Island and Lafayette Coney Island, followed Todoroff’s Original Coney Island in Jackson, Michigan, which dates its beginning to 1914.


In 1917, Gust Keros, a Greek immigrant, opened American Coney Island on West Lafayette Street in downtown Detroit. A few years later, in 1924, he brought his brother William to Detroit to help. Keros’s brother opened Lafayette Coney Island when space opened up next door. The businesses have operated continuously in the same locations ever since.


Both of these Detroit Coney Islands are incredibly popular to this day, where there is an on-going argument over which establishment serves the best Coney dog. A true Coney uses made-in-Michigan products such as Dearborn Sausage wieners. The chili recipes, key to the Coney dog, differ: American makes it own chili which is said to be spicier than the beefier chili of Lafayette, made from a family recipe. The dispute has been featured on several food television shows, including Food Wars and Man v. Food.


American Coney Island continues to be owned by the third-generation Keros family, but Lafayette is no longer family-held. There are hundreds of Coney Island restaurants in Michigan, some of the larger Detroit area chains are Leo’s and National. A Coney dog in Vermont and parts of New York is called a “Michigan.


We be epicureans - or gourmets - or at least fluorescent green relish haters. Remember - you're talking with the man that just bought $150 worth of hot dogs.:rolling-smiley:
 

Mysto

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For those of you that have become intrigued - you too can experience the wonder (and heartburn) of the real Coney Hot Dogs.
Several Michigan places will ship kits to you. Here is one from the World Famous American Coney Island. For only $69 you too can get good eats.
american-coney-island-kit.95e1858b0469c4e33c7c84ce616507da.jpg

https://www.goldbelly.com/american-...n3Y6P1_mw83Wuwc_F_fdZmdnelHO3xuAaAnACEALw_wcB
I don't think they ship to Japan Jeff - sorry.
My wonderful Koegels vinena natural casing hot dogs can also be ordered online but shipping is a killer.
 

Scott Merryfield

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Yes, shipping can be quite expensive. It cost my friend a pretty penny to have hot dogs and fixings shipped from Portillo's in Chicago to Chelsea, Michigan (about 15 minutes west of Ann Arbor) for his wife's 50th. He also had some pizzas shipped from his wife's favorite Chicago pizzeria. We told him it would have been less expensive for him to drive the 4 hours each way to Chicago and back to pick everything up.
 

Kevin C Brown

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I'm jealous. :) I've lived in Northern California for 30 years. The dog situation here really stinks. My faves are from these two places:

http://www.theoriginalhotdogshop.com/

And:

https://www.tedshotdogs.com/

I'll keep the Coney Island dogs in MI on my radar though. Haven't been there yet, but I'm always up for a good dog!

(Dang, the dog situation here really stinks!)
 

BobO'Link

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I absolutely love sausages. All kinds. Hot dogs, balogna, bratwurst, knockwurst, liverwurst, boudin, chorizo, salami, pepperoni, kielbasa, you get the picture.

I love a good chili dog. It doesn't *have" to be a hot dog but can be a brat or kielbasa. I prefer Hebrew National, grilled in an iron skillet/griddle or on a charcoal grill. Most of the time it's an Oscar Mayer Beef Bun Length dog ('cause that's what my wife prefers). For the chili it's Wick Fowler's 2 Alarm - made without beans. A little mustard on the bun. No onion (not necessarily opposed to it but am not a big fan) but some shredded extra sharp cheddar on top.

Second favorite build is mustard on the bun, grilled dog, chili, topped with KFC coleslaw (we have a copy of the recipe and make it ourselves).

My absolutely favorite way is mustard on the bun, grilled dog, chili, topped with sauerkraut.

Change the hot dog to a kiesbasa and I'm even happier (although I'm OK with either).

If I can get one of each I'm in heaven.

Another favorite build is mustard on the bun, grilled dog, topped with sweet pickle relish (and none of that green dye added stuff).

I just don't "get" wanting a "snap" on the casings. Every time I get a dog/sausage like that I wind up with a casing that has a texture that's chewy like gristle. Blech.
 

BobO'Link

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Do tell! My favorite coleslaw!
I'm guessing you want the recipe.

We usually make it the old way - with the cabbage and carrot in rice size pieces. As you know, they stopped doing that a few years back. It mostly tastes the same but it's really a different experience.

Here ya go:
KFC Classic Coleslaw

Ingredients:
1 head cabbage, finely chopped (roughly 8 cups)
1 medium carrot, finely chopped (about 1/4 cup)
2 tablespoons finely minced yellow onion (I often just toss it in the food processor with the carrot)
1/2 cup sugar
1 cup Miracle Whip (*NOT* mayonnaise - it's a different experience and flavor)
3 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
1/4 teaspoon xanthan gum (optional - to reduce "weaping" - we don't use this as we like it a bit liquid and it better matches how you'd get it from the store.)

Preparation:
Using a food processor (this) or a knife (only if you're *very* good), chop the cabbage and carrots very finely, until they are the size of rice. If using a food processor this works best to process each individually.
In a large bowl, toss the chopped cabbage mixture with the onion and set aside.
Meanwhile, in a small bowl, combine the sugar, mayonnaise, apple cider vinegar, and xanthan gum. Whisk the dressing until it is very smooth.
Add the dressing to the cabbage mixture and mix well.
Cover the coleslaw and place it in the refrigerator for at least 4 hours, or as long as 24 hours. Stir well before serving.

Optional:
Before serving the coleslaw, place it in a strainer to remove the excess water. Use the coleslaw water to make other dressings and sauces.

I've had a store employee tell me they use tarragon vinegar but I've not made any of this to see how it changes the flavor. We're quite happy with the results just as they are.

It's very important to make it ahead so the flavors have proper time to blend. It's good right after it's been made but improves with a 4-24 hour gestation.
 

BobO'Link

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Sacrilege! What are they thinking?!

Thanks for the recipe!
It's easier. They used to have to chop the cabbage and carrot to get that texture/size. Now they can just purchase pre-packaged "coleslaw mix" and add the minced onion and dressing. It tastes about the same but the larger size does change the flavor profile. It's just a bit "off" with the larger cabbage pieces. I think it was a mistake.

You're welcome! Enjoy!
 

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