Horizontal Studio/40 vs Studio/CC for center

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Erich S, Oct 6, 2001.

  1. Erich S

    Erich S Agent

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    How does a shielded horizontal Paradigm Studio/40 compare to the Studio/CC for the center channel? I am considering Studio/40s or or Studio/60s for the front with Studio/20s for the side and rear surrounds (driven by a Denon AVR-4802) plus a Paradigm Servo-15 or SVS subwoofer. The center will be about 11 feet from the listening positions which are up to 20 degrees off axis. With a Studio/40 center, would the 40s be better than the 60s for the front? The room is 15 feet wide by 22 feet deep with 8 foot ceiling.
     
  2. PatrickM

    PatrickM Screenwriter

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    If your going to use a 40 for a center don't place it horizontal since the design of the 40's dispersion pattern is made for it to be vertical not horizontal. It is not one of those Left/Center/Right type designs.
    As for 40's versus 60's, you'll have to listen for yourself but one thing the 60's offer you versus the 40's is no need for stands.
    Patrick
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  3. Saurav

    Saurav Cinematographer

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    If you take a speaker designed to be oriented one way and place it in a different orientation, you will usually get pretty poor sound. You could try it, but I wouldn't recommend it. Speakers are designed to have a wide sweet spot, and reduce reflections from the floor and ceiling. This means they have wide horizontal dispersion, and pretty narrow vertical dispersion. If you lay this speaker on its side, it's going to have wide vertical dispersion, and narrow horizontal dispersion. Physically, that means the speaker will sound pretty much the same if you sit on the floor or stand up, but it'll change pretty significantly if you move a little to the left or the right. That isn't good for any speaker, and especially not a center channel.
     

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