Hookup Question

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Andrew V, Sep 10, 2001.

  1. Andrew V

    Andrew V Stunt Coordinator

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    What I want to do is hook up my VCR so I can record a TV program.
    Right now, I have the cable signal going directly into my TV. Then I have another Coaxial going from the TV’s “Monitor Out” to the “Antenna In” on the VCR. The only problem with this setup is the TV needs to be on in order for the VCR to record. If the TV is off then the Recorded program will be all “snowy” and unwatchable.
    The obvious solution would be to run the Cable signal directly into my VCR and then back out to the TV. Since my cable signal is bad enough I want to try to avoid this scenario.
    Is there any other way I could hook up my VCR? Thanks in advanced for you help.
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  2. Jeremy Hegna

    Jeremy Hegna Supporting Actor

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    No, Andrew....unless you have a video switching receiver, in which case the power must be on the receiver to record.
    It shouldn't degrade your signal anymore than it is with a composite trip through the VCR.
    Another suggestion would be to buy an S-VHS player ($130) and use the S-Video connnection for better signal.
    Jeremy
     
  3. RoyGBiv

    RoyGBiv Stunt Coordinator

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    Andrew:
    In order to tape something on the VCR you have to have the cable signal coming in. You can do that one of three ways. First, as you are now, which as you say only works when the TV is on. Second, to the VCR and then to the TV. Usually if the VCR is any good there is surprisingly little degradation of the signal in doing this. Third, is to use a good quality splitter and split the cable signal using one output to the TV and one to the VCR. Again, the quality of the splitter and cable will effect the end result. Also, if your cable quality is really that bad, call the cable company and have them come out to see if they can improve it. I hate my cable company, but any time I call to complain, they are there that day and stay as long as it takes to correct what I want them to.
    Good luck.
    SMK
     
  4. Andrew V

    Andrew V Stunt Coordinator

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  5. Steve Berger

    Steve Berger Supporting Actor

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    You might also add an amplified coupler to split the signal. This device is a splitter with slight amplification (3-5 db). This would make up for some signal losses without generating too much interference. If your cable installation has a splitter inside the house for multiple locations you could replace it with an amplified coupler and improve the signal on all your sets. I use central amplification with appropriate splitters at each location, connecting all video devices to the TV (or AV amp) with RCA and s-video cables.
     
  6. Andrew V

    Andrew V Stunt Coordinator

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