Home Theater Forum Review: THEATERTEK HTPC DVD SOFTWARE (UPDATED: Info on vers 1.5)

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Vince Maskeeper, Jul 12, 2002.

  1. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 1999
    Messages:
    6,499
    Likes Received:
    0
    [I want to apologize for the delay in posting this review. TT sent me the software back in March, and I started my review then. However, I wanted to wait until they got a finished and detailed website posted with ordering ability before publishing my review. Last month, http://www.theatertek.com went online- just in time for my PC crash that prevented me getting to my half completed review. So, finally, everything has come together-- the planets have aligned, and I give you my review of this software:]
    Introduction
    When I first decided I wanted to explore the HTPC route, I was daunted. I have never considered myself much of a PC guru – I had never been much into computer gaming, so the concepts of cutting edge video cards and overclocking never really came into my realm of knowledge. Even in my chosen profession (audio recording and engineering)- I have only begun in the last year to really employ computer technology into my work despite the fact that the industry has been doing so for over a decade. Because I had never really been much beyond a “power user” of computers, the prospect of basing my entire HT around a PC (which usually requires quite a bit of tinkering and tweaking) was something that legitimately scared me.
    However, the appeal of HTPC advantages drew me ever closer.
    There were the obvious picture quality issues. Given that I have a DLP projector with 1024x768 native resolution, I knew offering scaled DVD to 1024x786 progressive would be the ideal. From what I had read on the Internet, the scaling abilities of Radeon based HTPC were easily approaching or equal to the picture quality of top of the line (and top dollar) scaling device like Faroudja.
    Then there were the interface issues. With the confusing menagerie of various DVD picture formats (Anamorphic, 4:3, Letterbox, 1.66:1 letterbox, etc) and the various configuration options for playback- this tended to make use of the HT system by anyone other than myself to be very difficult. While a scaler could handle all the options, most required a manual configuration by the user- that was less than ideal.
    Then there was the appeal of all the extras. Integration of DVD playback into a box with MP3s, JPEG slideshows, CD and wav playback, streaming audio and video, movie trailers. HTPC even offered control integration of other systems (trigger lighting, serial control of my projector, etc).
    Therefore, since there were a million reasons to go with a HTPC- I broke down a built a machine to mount in my equipment rack and serve as the new heart of my playback system. With some pointers from the fine members both on this forum and AVSforum, I built a very nice system for around $1100.
    One of the first difficult choices you have to make, after the piecing together of the infinite hardware options, is the selection of software. In the realm of DVD playback, this is made easy (or at least easier) by the fact that there are really only a handful of viable options. I started with PowerDVD (as it was packaged with my DVD drive)- but found out quickly that it simply did not offer the streamlining I had really hoped for with HTPC. While PowerDVD did offer a decent picture quality, it operated as a DVD interface designed for desktop computer use with an annoying visual control surface, not like an integrated HTPC solution.
    In addition, all the best players in terms of picture quality seemed to require extensive tinkering with various registry settings under windows. While I am comfortable with monkeying about in the registry, I really had hoped to find something that would perform reasonably well without a serious amount of work under the hood.
    Then I read about THEATERTEK software on the avsforum.
    [c][​IMG][/c]
    From the initial information, it sounded exactly like what I had been looking for. The software incorporated the most popular set of filters for both audio and picture quality with an interface designed specifically with HTPC in mind. So not only would it offer equal the picture quality to the best-looking players (like Ati’s player), but would behave in an ideal manner for HTPC users. Best of all, the configuration was prefabricated, so little or no registry tweaking would be needed.
    I have now been a TheaterTek user for about 3 months, and feel comfortable posting a full review of the software. In short, the software does offer excellent picture quality and a very good HTPC specific interface- but the product is not without a few shortcomings:
    Pro’s
    Fellow HT nuts produce Theatertek.
    This program is authored and maintained by members of the internet home theater community, and the authors are frequent posters on sites like this one and the Avsforum. Bottom line is, this is a group of Home Theater nuts like you and I producing software specifically to meet the need and desires of this group.
    Theatertek uses the highest quality cinemaster audio decoders as well as video decoders from Ravisent Technologies.
    Those “in the know” have regarded Ravisent filter as offering the best picture for PC based DVD playback. These filters have been utilized in the popular ATI DVD player as well as being the prime option in the Zoom player. With the use of the Ravisent filters, Theatertek offers truly stunning image quality. Theatertek provides both Dolby Digital and DTS SP/DIF passthru perfectly (I’m using the M-audio 2496 Audiophile).
    After having 3 or 4 months to really live with this player, I can say the picture quality exceeds everything I had used previously by leaps and bounds. I have run Power DVD, PowerDVD XP and an older version of Windvd- and none of them even approached the picture quality of the TT player. Not even close. The TT filters are much smoother, and the overall picture quality could be described as film-like. I simply cannot say enough about the picture quality of theatertek via the Radeon video card.
    Theatertek offers amazingly complete aspect ratio control and settings.
    [c][​IMG][/c]
    This is a huge feature for me, and I would assume it would be huge for anyone thinking about HTPC.
    Each common aspect ratio is offered by default. You go through and setup the output for each aspect, using very simple arrow tools (like the kind you find to adjust a computer monitor). As you re-size the image, it allows you to lock the aspect ratio (and gives you exact figures on your current ratio).
    After you save the setting, any disc flagged for that aspect would automatically use your preset size and shape settings.
    Non-Anamorphic letterboxed discs automatically zoom. 4:3 discs automatically format with blanking on the sides. The player swaps through aspects as the disc plays, automatically. Even 2.35:1 material can be setup with special settings, for those using Anamorphic lenses or using fixed height projection systems!
    If that is not enough, you can define custom aspects- and associate them with a single disc automatically. Setup a 1.66:1 zoom for non-anamorphic discs- and associate this with the discs in your collection. Every time you put them in, it will use your custom aspect! If a disc is improperly flagged (like Titanic for example)- you can assign it to the proper aspect and it will remember and use that each time it is inserted!
    All blanking can be adjusted in all possible directions (like a built in version of the popular application YXY)- and can be color adjusted to prevent burn-in CRT based sets!
    A player with 100% automatic aspect control. Your family members can insert a disc and press play!
    Theatertek offers auto start functions for all your DVDs!
    I hear quite a bit of complaining on this forum and others about the animated menus and FBI warnings. Some long for the days of Laserdisc, where you could insert the disc, press play, and away you go.
    Theatertek allows you to set a default title for the disc, and the DVD will jump directly to this title and start playing, using your audio and video settings assigned for the disc. You put in the disc and the movie starts with the setting you want, just that simple.
    Theatertek is designed to behave like a stand alone DVD player.
    [​IMG]
    The computer point and click interface is just not ideal for HTPC. We want seamless integration! Theatertek addresses this issue completely. The navigation and playback controls are all available via direct hotkey commands. The use of onscreen displays is designed to emulate a stand alone DVD player, and offers very sleek looking simple graphics. I bought an IR wireless keyboard and taught the keystrokes to my universal remote- and the average person wouldn’t know the difference between the Theatertek interface and my old Panasonic RV-80 player:
    Theatertek is an Internet product, with a bulletin board manned by programmers and staff.
    The theatertek website offers a discussion forum for technical assistance which has proven to be an amazing resource. Theatertek is also a popular application on forums like the AVS forum, so everything from basic setup help to uber-tweaking is accessible by just a few keystrokes. The staff at TT responds very quickly to questions and bugs- the software release patches to correct known errors very quickly- so the product gets better by the month!
    Con’s
    OK, well here’s the stuff that I don’t like about the player. I would say that I should make it clear that the majority of the faults listed here have more to do with the whole idea of HTPC and computers than directly with theatertek, so some of these are issues you will have with any player.
    Despite being sold as a fool proof HTPC solution, some tweaking may be required.
    Theatertek has tried to present their product as an “install and go” HTPC solution. While I would say this player is head and shoulders above other serious HTPC playback software, it still is not without some occasional need for tweaking by some users. Right now, if you go to the Theatertek site you will find that some of the ATI Driver/Card/OS configurations are causing some users fits. You might be wise to have a basic working knowledge of registry editing and plan to research the drivers available for your OS and Card before you move forward. I don’t think you will need to any serious overhauling to get TT to work (you won’t need to whip out your soldering iron!), but you shouldn’t expect it to be something that will work perfectly for 100% of configurations. But, this is kind of the nature of computer software- for anyone who has dealt extensively with computers- this is old hat.
    Hardware accel on video, bob/weave and whatnot- combing and restarts.
    This is my major fault with this player- although I’m not literate enough to know for sure- I believe this is a shortcoming with computer technology, not necessarily with the player:
    Hardware acceleration provides the smoothest picture using the TT player. However, HW accel does not work properly on some discs- specifically it has a hard time with “video source” material (30 frame like TV shows). The video sourced stuff often combs badly and twitches, there is obviously something wrong. Usually in order to watch some video based discs (or extras for that matter), you have to disable HW accel. This doesn’t seem like a big deal, but in order to do so you must restart the computer.
    But that doesn’t always fix the problem. Under video settings when in software decoding mode, you have 3 options: auto, bob, and weave. Often, the auto feature does not work very well (I have read it relies on flags in the material, which aren’t always reliable). So, sometimes combing continues. You have to switch to force it to bob or weave. And guess what, you have to restart the computer.
    Recently, in order to watch the documentary on the Star Wars: The Phantom Menace disc, I had to restart the machine 3 times before finally getting to a video setting that would play the material without major combing and video twitching.
    On a side note, this video twitching problem also affects some DVD menus. So, while you will be blown away when you get the feature playing- sometimes menus will look downright horrible. Certainly not the end of the world- but not ideal when you’ve invited guests to show off the system!
    I don’t know if there is anything TT can specifically do about this, but right now it is the only thing preventing me from being 200% ecstatic about this product.
    Small bugs and problems
    There are a handful of small bugs that the TT people are working to fix, or have determined are not the fault of the software:
    1)Popping audio when going from pause to play. I have a loud burst of noise sometimes on switching. Some work is going into figuring out exactly why this happens (there is a twelve-page discussion on the TT forum)- but from what I’ve read the latest Audiophile drivers running under XP have solved the problem- so I’m considering making the change to XP (again).
    2)Slow menu navigations. This is a problem many have reported: from time to time, seemingly at random, TT will experience a staggered response in menu navigation. This just means there is a 1 second delay after you press a navigation button in a menu before the onscreen cursor moves. I know the TT people are aware of the problem and are trying to figure it out.
    3)FF/REW bug. Some people experience hyper fast shuttling using TT. This appears to be a compatibility flaw with the decoder filters and some configurations. I don’t have the problem myself- but if you’re concerned, read the TT forum for more info.
    Conclusion.
    Let me simply say that this software, despite some small bugs that seem to go hand and hand with the concept of HTPC, is absolutely fabulous. I can honestly say that if you’re reasonably comfortable with computer hardware and configuration, and you have a display which supports higher than NTSC sync rates: there is absolutely no excuse to not have a HTPC running TheaterTek. The advantages are almost limitless, and the display improvement is simply night and day over a standalone DVD player.
    [c][​IMG][​IMG][/c]
    If I had seen the performance of TheaterTek on someone else’s system, I would have built a HTPC specifically to run it. It is simply that good. In terms of features, it answers nearly every need specific to configuring a HTPC. In terms of picture quality- it’s a 700 pound gorilla which slaughters every other DVD playback system I've seen!
    The software costs $69.95, and in my opinion is a deal at twice the price. Unfortunately they do not offer a demo version of the software- but you have a 7 day trial period after you purchase in order to test it. You can return it within the trial period for a full refund.
    -V
    PS: There are three issues which I feel need to mentioned as a footnote to this review for those not too familiar with TT:
    1) There has been some grumbling about the registration situation for this software. Because TT is a small operation and don't have multimillion dollar licensing deals like PowerDVD- they have taken steps to protect TT from hackers. The program uses a hardware specific registration system- which means if you change the configuration of your system, you will need a new unlock code from TheaterTek. I found this to be a non-issue as they sent me an unlock code within hours of my request. However some have found this type of arrangement to be a deal-breaker. Regardless, I felt you should be aware of this situation before you buy.
    2) TT will play VOB files from your hard drive. TT will not play VCD at this time, although I'm told it's planned for future versions.
    3) The 2 configuration menu screens above are from an older build of TT- the newest build has added several options and moved things around a bit.
     
  2. Dave Weida

    Dave Weida Extra

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2000
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    0
    Vince,

    Great review, I wish I had your knowledge. I am a novice when it comes to HTPC. I will be ordering a HTPC system which will include TT, so, based on some of your cons do you think I will experience some of these issues. I would not know how to change things and I certainly would not want to keep re-booting when I want to watch a DVD trailer, etc. before watching the movie. One of the reasons why I am willing to spend the extra money for a pre-fab system was in the hopes that I and my family would not experience some of the issues that I read on this and other forums. What do you think?

    Dave
     
  3. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 1999
    Messages:
    6,499
    Likes Received:
    0


    Well, the good news is that I haven't had much problem with trailers- since the original material is 24 frame (the same as the feature). I haven't done any serious studying on the matter- but simply from basic usage- I have been able to use Hardware acceleration mode without chnage for trailers.

    In the "etc" category, I can't offer an answer and be confident I'll be correct. I'm not sure if the problems I've experienced with TT playing back video based material are exclusive to my particular video card or configuration. In addition to documentary type stuff on DVD, discs like South Park volumes 1-6 give TT fits on my system. I would have considered experimenting with the software using different systems to see if the problem was absolute- however as I mentioned above the software registration code is keyed to my hardware- so I cannot install it on any machine other than the main HTPC or I have to apply for a new reg number.

    I'm planning to post a link to this review over on the theatertek boards- maybe one of the moderators over there can offer an answer to why this happens and if everyone is affected.

    -Vince
     
  4. Dave_Olds

    Dave_Olds Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2002
    Messages:
    188
    Likes Received:
    0
    D'OH.....just bought Power DVD for my HTPC yesterday....

    *sigh*


    Dave
     
  5. Marty Christion

    Marty Christion Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2001
    Messages:
    229
    Likes Received:
    0
    Great review, Vince. This is the kind of write up I have been looking for, as I like to know a lot about a product before I buy it. Until now, it has been hard to find a "beginner's" guide to the TheaterTek software. Now I know exactly what to expect.
    Just a note: I've been using WinDVD, PowerDVD, and ZoomPlayer on my HTPC, and most of the "Cons" you list are found in all of them. I guess your review could be read by two different groups: those who are just looking into the world of HTPC, and those with a HTPC looking to upgrade their software. Someone looking into a HTPC should be aware of all the potential downsides, but since you are reviewing a particular piece of software, it would be a shame for a novice to assume that it has faults that aren't shared by the competition. (Even though you specifically stated this in your review, I just wanted to re-iterate it).
    Again, great write up, [​IMG] and I hope it gets well publicized by TheaterTek to "get the word out". HTPC's are the best kept secret in Home Theater today, and everyone with an HDTV should be aware of what is within their grasp. I will even go so far as to say that my 55" HDTV looks as good as the average cinema (just smaller) when I watch a DVD. It is just so clear, sharp and detailed, that even my wife has to comment about the spectacular picture when we watch movies (and she was never impressed with 480p DVD).
     
  6. Dave Weida

    Dave Weida Extra

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2000
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks Vince for the vote of confidence.

    Again Great Review.

    Dave
     
  7. Steve_Ch

    Steve_Ch Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2001
    Messages:
    978
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hey Vince, which Radeon do you use ? Better yet, what's your setup (I am sure you have posted it before)?? $69 for quality SW is not bad.
     
  8. Max Leung

    Max Leung Producer

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2000
    Messages:
    4,611
    Likes Received:
    0
    Great review Vince! Boy it's been a long time in coming. At least I won't be nagging you anymore. [​IMG]
    Vince, do you know how video playback on a Geforce 4 Ti card compares to the Radeon with the TheaterTek player? I'd like to know if TheaterTek still blows away PowerDVD, WinDVD, et al. if you only have a "lowly" GeForce card.
    Also, is there an option to move subtitles around the screen? Would be really handy for movies like Perfect Blue, which insist on placing subtitles in the black bar area. Perfect Blue is 1.85:1 letterboxed, and zooming will cut off the text! [​IMG]
     
  9. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 1999
    Messages:
    6,499
    Likes Received:
    0
    REVIEW UPDATE
    Hello again guys!
    I have been chatting a bit with Andrew Chilvers at Theatertek about my review, and wanted to post a little follow-up about the issue of rebooting for toggling Hardware/Software decoding. According to Andrew, the reboot is actually not necessary- you need only quit the player or eject the disk. On next player launch or inserting a new DVD, the changed settings will take effect.
    I checked this with my copy, and it does work. When you change the setting, the next time you start the player a pop up informs you that you need to restart-- however I never noticed it was more of a suggestion than a demand: saying "you might need to restart for changes to take effect".
    I also found that all of a sudden the TPM documentary that gave me problems previously now works in Software>Auto mode, rather than requiring additional toggling to force Bob or Weave. I don't know if this is the result of the latest player patch or if I was simply an idiot previously.
    But the good news is that getting the change from HW to SW mode does not actually require the restart. According to Andrew:
    So there you have it folks. Anyone who was turned off by the reboot problem can rest easy that it won't be necessary- and it looks like in the future we might achieve even more streamlined playback!
    -V
     
  10. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 1999
    Messages:
    6,499
    Likes Received:
    0
    Right now, I don't think that there is. However- I know this is a feature that has been discussed on the TT forum, so you're not alone.
    http://forums.theatertek.com/showthr...&threadid=3596
    There is some debate as to how the subtitles are encoded on the disc, and if they can or cannot be relocated.
    -Vince
     
  11. Matt DeVillier

    Matt DeVillier Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 1999
    Messages:
    773
    Likes Received:
    0
    Vince,

    one note on your last post regarding Radeon models and chip used:

    RV100 Core (0.18um)
    no hardware T&L engine | Dual Monitor Support (HydraVision)

    Radeon VE
    Radeon 7000 No Dual Monitor
    Radeon 7000 64MB
    Mobility Radeon (M6 Core -- Same Features as RV100)


    R100 Core (0.18um)
    T&L DirectX 7

    Radeon SDR
    Radeon DDR
    All-in-Wonder Radeon PCI SDR
    All-in-Wonder Radeon AGP SDR (OEM)
    All-in-Wonder Radeon AGP DDR
    Radeon 7200


    RV200 Core (0.15um)
    T&L DirectX 7 | Die Shrunk R100 (R200 Mem Controller) | Dual Monitor Support (HydraVision)

    Radeon 7500
    All-in-Wonder Radeon 7500 No Dual Monitor -- With Remote
    Mobility Radeon 7500 (M7 Core -- Same Features as RV200)


    R200 Core (0.15um)
    T&L DirectX 8.1 | Dual Monitor Support (HydraVision)

    Radeon 8500 (64MB)
    Radeon 8500 (128MB)
    Radeon 8500LE (128MB)
    All-in-Wonder Radeon 8500DV With Firewire No Dual Monitor -- With Remote
    All-in-Wonder Radeon 8500 (128MB) No Dual Monitor -- With Remote


    as you can see above, the Radeon 7500 and the 7000/7200 use a slightly different chip. I'm not aware of any differences in the quality of DVD playback though
     
  12. gregstaten

    gregstaten Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 1997
    Messages:
    608
    Likes Received:
    3
    FYI - there's a new patch release out today that fixes navigation problems with some discs.

    I've been using TheaterTek from the very beginning and it is absolutely outstanding. I can't imagine using a high-end (or medium-end) digital projector without it.

    -greg
     
  13. Brian Kleinke

    Brian Kleinke Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 1999
    Messages:
    974
    Likes Received:
    0
    I've been running TheaterTek since it came out, IMHO it's the best PC DVD player out there, granted it does have a host of its own issues, and I have one friend who loves to crack when my 'puter crashes that he's never had to reset his DVD player.

    I've never been able to get Hardware acceleration to work reliable, though it really should, I blame it on my computer but the player still works fine. I'm not using it atm due to some other issues with the 'puter (I really regret using Win ME instead of 2k on this box...)

    Long story short I love TheaterTek and wouldn't want to use any other PC DVD player.

    Brian
     
  14. Eric F

    Eric F Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 1999
    Messages:
    1,810
    Likes Received:
    0
    The Cineplayer audio decoder is pretty much useless if you have a high-end audio card. Especially if you need onboard decoding of DTS.
    I just use Zoomplayer. I register the Cineplayer video codec that comes with the ATI 7.7 DVD player and WinDVD's audio filter to run with my EgoSys Waveterminal 192L and all works very nicely.
    A nice, cheap solution. ZoomPlayer's front-end is improving by the day. You gotta hand it to Blight for producing such a flexible piece of software for free. Nice guy. [​IMG]
     
  15. Michael Silla

    Michael Silla Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2001
    Messages:
    313
    Likes Received:
    0
    Does this software allow you to run your own movie trailers in front of the main movie vob on a particular DVD?.

    What I have always envisioned doing is having the latest movie trailers play before that weeks rental to "wow" my guests, so to speak.....

    Michael.
     
  16. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 1999
    Messages:
    6,499
    Likes Received:
    0
    Theatertek does not currently do trailer before the feature, but it is certainly on the "to be added" features list. Technically there are a few ways to cheat this and do it anyway- but it's a little complex.

    Bottom line is this is a pretty widely requested feature of TT, and I would imagine that once they get the majority of pressing issues about the software handled that this will be one of the first options they add (Along with playing VCD and Playing VOB files from the harddrive).

    -Vince
     
  17. Brian Ruth

    Brian Ruth Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2002
    Messages:
    563
    Likes Received:
    0
    Vince: Is DTS Decoding (and possible DD-EX and DTS-ES decoding) in the cards?
     
  18. gregstaten

    gregstaten Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 1997
    Messages:
    608
    Likes Received:
    3
    I'm not Vince, but in my opinion, TheaterTek SHOULDN'T spend time working on DTS or Dolby Digital decoding. Why? Well, there are third party audio cards in the works that will do it for them. And, frankly, I believe most would rather have a full-featured audio pre-pro to do the processing.

    I'm more interested in TheaterTek working to improve picture quality and image-based features. Let it hand the audio bitstream off to another device to handle the audio decoding.

    But, that's just my opinion.

    -greg
     
  19. Rob Verstegen

    Rob Verstegen Auditioning

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2002
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hello Vince,

    As an audio engineer how would you rate the audio quality of the Theatertek/M-audio combi against a regular stand-alone DVD-player ?

    Thanks,
    Rob
     
  20. Mike_G

    Mike_G Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2000
    Messages:
    1,477
    Likes Received:
    14
    Real Name:
    Mike
    This sounds like WICKED software. The one thing that would get me to buy it is if it had the feature that PowerDVD has, which would be to play a playlist of .vob files or .mpg files in a given order (yes, the .vobs are my own!). Since my PC runs the trailers and my JVC runs the movie itself, marrying the two together in one solution would make me buy that in a heartbeat, because with my current setup I have to switch from the PC's input to the DVD's on my Denon, have the DVD already cued up, etc. It's annoying.
    If this software allowed me to play the trailers in the playlist, and then auto-start the movie from the title specified, I'd buy it immediately.
    This feature of starting the DVD from a given spot is SWEET! I LOVE THAT!
    The problem is, I have a Radeon 64MB DDR now, and the video output is OK for the trailers, but it's not ready for prime time. I don't remember if it even supports 16x9 mode. I plan on getting the new Radeon 9500 when it comes out soon. Maybe that will solve my problems.
    My projector is an old Zenith. It does 16x9 but not progressive. I don't plan on getting a progressive projector until the HiDef ones come down in price a little more.
    Edit (add): OOOOOH! What if the software also played a playlist of MP3s, .wavs, or a CD of music before the movie started? Then you tell it "Play a random playlist of music until 8pm, then play the trailer playlist, and then start the movie" and automagically at 8pm, the .vob/.mpg playlist plays, and then the movie starts.
    [​IMG]
    Mike
     

Share This Page