Home built Sonotube or SVS

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by DanielKellmii, Mar 23, 2004.

  1. DanielKellmii

    DanielKellmii Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2004
    Messages:
    524
    Likes Received:
    0
    So after reading stuff on this forum and other places I realize that I want more from my sub. What I have does move the furniture at the right times and provided plenty of volume, but I want to get a little lower. I want to feel those LFE's. Maybe ever hear something around f'in Irene in Black Hawk Down. I see some information about home built sonotube subs. Wow, looks like the answer to my prayers. I have an open floor plan. My family room opens up into the kitchen/living room/dining room. My guess is that it is around 8000 cubic feet. I listen to movies at a moderate volume, so having a lot of headspace isn't a big deal.
    What I really want is a lower than standard tuning point (20Hz) and enough volume so the people near the sub will get a "thump" when things explode. After doing a little research on DIY subs that do that the price of the materials comes to about $500-$600. OK, so I click on the SVS banner above and the 20-39PCi pops up for $599. Add $75 for shipping and for $675 I have what I want...I think.

    I am capable when it comes to using tools, so building a sonotube won't be too hard. I'll don't have a lot of wood working tools, so I will have to fake a lot of things with my Dremel, but that is OK. But if I go the home built route, it won't end up looking pretty.

    So, is it worth going the home built route of for a few more bucks is buying the SVS a better deal? What is the advantage of building my own sonotube? Thanks for any input.
     
  2. NickSo

    NickSo Producer

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2000
    Messages:
    4,260
    Likes Received:
    0
    Real Name:
    Nick So
    Do you have a home depot near by? Ive been told they rent tools... im prolly gonna rent a router from them if they do rent routers when i build mine during the summer hopefully...

    One advantage is fulfilling the male urge of creation, to create a huge thundering beast in your living room, knowing that sweet wonderful bass is from something YOU created [​IMG]

    Im trying to go ultra-cheap, nothing too fancy, i think i can keep my costs under $200 canadian (some wood, a sonotube, glue, caulk, speaker posts, spray paint, etc. I already have an SVS driver from awhile ago, go it for $60 iirc), but the thing is i dont need an amp. Im not sure if its the best option, for a bigger room like yours that needs more power.
     
  3. Wayne Ernst

    Wayne Ernst Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2002
    Messages:
    2,588
    Likes Received:
    0
    Daniel,

    Have you considered building an infinite baffle sub? If you have the space in a wall or ceiling, this might be an option worth looking into. Plus, the I.B. subs don't require too much of an amp to get the rockin'. With this being the case, you could consider:

    -(2) 15" Dayton I.B. drivers @ $119.83 each from Parts Express.
    -(1) 250 watt plate amplifier @ $89.00 from MCM.
    - Misc. parts to make the baffle/manifold and possibly a vent cover. Approx. $40.00 for these supplies @ Home Depot.

    There you have it. $330 + tax and/or shipping charges for a "killer" sub. [​IMG]
     
  4. DanielKellmii

    DanielKellmii Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2004
    Messages:
    524
    Likes Received:
    0
    Wayne, you have great suggestions and are amazingly helpful.

    Hmmmmmm, I have 10 foot ceilings and the laudry room is just behind the HT room. Do you think I can mount it on the wall there? But I would have to make it somewhat presentable even if I just hang some black cloth around it. But I am honestly afraid that it will fall down one day. I have read a little about infinite subs, but I am not sure. Essentially, I would just mount the drivers with the cone side facing the HT room and the magnet side in another room with nothing around it. Is that about it? I would have to find acoutic cloth that matched my paint, otherwise it would be a no go. As it is, the big black box causes some amount of problems.

    Is an infinite baffle sub capable of producing 20Hz effects well? I guess when I have the money I would get a Berhinger (sp?) feedback destroyer. Well, I have the money now, but if I spend it on any more of my "toys" I will be sleeping on the couch.
     
  5. ThomasW

    ThomasW Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 1999
    Messages:
    2,282
    Likes Received:
    0
  6. Wayne Ernst

    Wayne Ernst Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2002
    Messages:
    2,588
    Likes Received:
    0
  7. DanielKellmii

    DanielKellmii Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2004
    Messages:
    524
    Likes Received:
    0
    I ask one question and end up with 5 more. But has anybody thought about my original question? I admit at this point it is now a point of curiosity but I am still interested.


    Now how do I tell my wife about the twin 15 inch drivers in her wall????
    Jewlery!!!! But then I have no money left over for the project [​IMG]
     
  8. Wayne Ernst

    Wayne Ernst Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2002
    Messages:
    2,588
    Likes Received:
    0


    Daniel,

    Actually, I think your wife might be more comfortable with 15" drivers mounted in the wall with a nice grille cover on them as opposed to a phallic-looking "tube" sub in your room.

    Just my .02. [​IMG]
     
  9. Wayne Ernst

    Wayne Ernst Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2002
    Messages:
    2,588
    Likes Received:
    0


    Daniel,

    Sure, one could build a DIY tube sub that would be very nice. However, one also has to consider their time and put a value on it.

    If you were looking at an SVS sub for $600, but then thought you could build something similar for $350 in parts. But, you'd have to look at the labor involved. If you spend 8 hours @ $30.00 per hour working on it, that's another $240 to the cost.

    Sure, building things is fun, but it may not be for everyone.
     
  10. ThomasW

    ThomasW Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 1999
    Messages:
    2,282
    Likes Received:
    0

    There's only one hole, and up to 4 drivers can share that cutout..........
     
  11. DanielKellmii

    DanielKellmii Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2004
    Messages:
    524
    Likes Received:
    0

    [​IMG]

    Good point. She'll let me do it if I paint the living room. Now the fun part is going to be cuting out the hole in my "popcorn" ceiling. That stuff makes such a mess.

    I picked up a old Toshiba receiver, only has the old Pro Logic. It is 110Wx2. Do you think I can use that as the amp. I'll just run the pre-out from my receiver to the aux in and then run the amplified signals to the speakers. I assume that I have to combine the two output signals into on signal somehow. Or, can I just connect each side to a driver. After all, the input signal will be mono, so each side should be producing identical signals.
     
  12. ThomasW

    ThomasW Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 1999
    Messages:
    2,282
    Likes Received:
    0

    Here's a little trick. First of course lay down a drop cloth. Then have the person doing the cutting in the attic use a real drywall saw. Next have a person below with a shop vac. Place the shop vac hose opening over the end of the drywall saw as it pokes through from the ceiling. Then follow the blade as the cut is made. Doing that will cut down on the mess
     
  13. DanielKellmii

    DanielKellmii Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2004
    Messages:
    524
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thomas, that sounds like a great idea. Thanks
     
  14. Rory Buszka

    Rory Buszka Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2002
    Messages:
    784
    Likes Received:
    0
    Just take care that the person holding the shop vac is paying attention so as to not have a cut-up shop vac hose.
     
  15. Wayne Ernst

    Wayne Ernst Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2002
    Messages:
    2,588
    Likes Received:
    0


    Rory,

    With a hand-held manual drywall saw, I don't think there is much of a chance of cutting the hose on the vac.

    Another idea would be to just a hold a trash can with a liner in it below the area being cut. If the can is held close enough to the ceiling, the debris will fall directly into the trash can.
     

Share This Page