Home Built 4ohm subs

Discussion in 'Speakers & Subwoofers' started by Mike Busch, Nov 12, 2004.

  1. Mike Busch

    Mike Busch Extra

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    Hey guys,

    First off, I'm a newb that just wanted to say hello. I'm in the unenviable process of buying a house right now and was starting to think how I can transform my "dorm" AV equipment into something more impressive. Obviously with buying a house, money is tight right now, so I can't shell out big $$$ to do everything the right way from the get go.

    But I'm not without anything decent(at least decent to my standards, maybe you all will dissagree). To make a long story short I have a pair of home built 15" bandpass sub boxes. I built them for my old Kicker 4 ohm car subs. The boxes for these subs are huge! Individually they both sound really good. Building the box to Kicker's specs gave me a much snappier sound out of my 15s than I had when they were in my car and space was limited. The only thing I noticed is in my old dorm room where floor space was limited the subs would cancel each other out inside the room. But all my neighbors could hear it clear as day. (they loved me... NOT).

    They have been sitting in my dad's basement for a few years because my current space is way too small for them. But I'll be moving to a place where I can once again thnk about setting up a nice AV setup.

    Any suggestions on how to give the room the best sound with the subs I have?

    Thanks,
    Mike
     
  2. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    Use ONE? Otherwise, stack them in one corner.
     
  3. Mike Busch

    Mike Busch Extra

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    Yeah that seems like the way, but you know how it is when you build something with your own hands. it would kill me to see one of the subs not being used. I mean perhaps there is no way to get two 15" subs to work together, and if that's so I'm sure someone can explain that to me. but if there is a chance I can make them work together, I have all the amps and hardware needed, so why not?

    How is stacking them going to help me? Can you explain why stacking would be better than having them both on the floor?

    Mike
     
  4. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    Putting them in the same corner of the room means the sound waves coming from each are in "tune" with eachother. For example: if the subs were located in opposite corners of a room that is not perfectly square, you introduce the possiblity of the cancellation you spoke of because the waves are bouncing around the room and intersecting out of phase at certain frequencies in certain areas of the room. This can happen with a single sub, but with two that are not close together, you run a greater risk of this happening.

    Side by side might work too, but stacking should still be slightly better.
     
  5. Greg_R

    Greg_R Screenwriter

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    Plus stacking them will result in a louder output (the subs acoustically couple with each other). If you place the subs in the corner then you'll have 3 large bass peaks that will need to be tamed with a parametric EQ (if SQ is a concern for you). You can place 1 sub at your listening position and then measure various room locations to find the flattest response. Stack all your subs at that location (you will now have flat response at your listening location).

    A Radio Shack analog SPL meter is a decent measuring device for both HT and car audio. You will need one of these!
     
  6. Mike Busch

    Mike Busch Extra

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    I don't mind picking up a meter to help find the sweet spot. But what do you mean by the "flattest response"?

    Mike
     
  7. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    Flat meaning no peaks or dips at a certain frequency.
     

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