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Holly Smokes...Die Another Day DD track is HOT!!! (1 Viewer)

Chris Shelly

Second Unit
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Dec 16, 2001
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274
I got this movie last night and watched it. This has to be one of the loudest mixes I have ever heard be it DD or DTS. Reference level on my system is 18 and I had to turn it down to 25 and it was still to loud. Dialog was okay but the action scenes....WOW!!!

I wonder how they did it? I always thought DD had certain limitations? I don't know how many reviews I have read about DVD's with both DTS and DD and the bashed the DD track because of the formats limitions can be heard on this DD track. The DTS track is so much better...bla bla!! Die Another Day proves DD can deliver if it wants to.

Chris
 

Jeff Kleist

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Chris, glad to see your eyes have been opened. In reality the difference between the 2 is negligable for the most part and most of the real difference comes down to the mixes used. Often, especially in the first few years of DVD DTS would use mixes they cooked to take advantage of their format. Now people are starting to realize that very often there is little to no difference.

The only exception I've found is LOTR:FOTR EE, the DD mix has the bass cranked outrageously and lacks the high end that the DTS mix has.
 

Richard Kim

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The only exception I've found is LOTR:FOTR EE, the DD mix has the bass cranked outrageously and lacks the high end that the DTS mix has.
Actually, the FOTR theatrical DVD was even louder than the EE in the LFE department, almost to a rediculous degree.
 

Ken_McAlinden

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Two common ways that the average levels can be cranked on a DD track are via dialog normalization and some form of dynamic range compression (typically peak limiting with look ahead limiters). The theatrical version DVD of LotR:FotR sounded like it used plenty of both. I don't like the sound of too much limiting/compression. Dialog normalization would increase the whole track by a certain number of decibels, so that doesn't sound like what Chris described with the Bond disc.

Regards,
 

Mike Graham

Supporting Actor
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This was one of the few movies that I have watched during its theatrical release that I found too damn loud. The action scenes had me wincing! But I won't lie to ya, I can't wait to hear the track on my own system!:D
 

Chris Shelly

Second Unit
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Dec 16, 2001
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So, Chris, did you try out the DTS track? Any comparisons?
I have not tried the DTS track. In fact I did not know it even had one until I looked at the back of the cover in small little print. Last night I found the menu annoying so I just hit play on got the default DD track.

My primary system had no trouble shaking the house with this movie. In fact my girlfriend was vacuuming upstairs and she thought we were having an earthquake...LOL

Be careful though. I was watching it today on my secondary system and the volume was not even that loud. I blew my Sherwood RD-7106 receiver at the start of the Madonna song. I highly doubt the movie had anything to do with it. More like a power supply. However this movie can be taxing.

Chris
 

Jeff Kleist

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I blew my Sherwood RD-7106 receiver at the start of the Madonna song. I highly doubt the movie had anything to do with it. More like a power supply. However this movie can be taxing.
I dunno, I think it was making commentary on that "song" :)
 

Charlie Essmeier

Stunt Coordinator
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Mar 7, 1999
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139
The differences between DTS and DD have been minimized since the studios cut the DTS bitrate in half.

On laserdiscs, where the bitrate was substantially higher for DTS, the differences between DTS and DD were significant.

Charlie
 

Aaron Garman

Second Unit
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Oct 23, 2001
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382
Hello all. I haven't picked up the DVD yet, but the theatrical mix was pretty insane. In both SRD, SR, SDDS, and DTS, we had to watch our fader's because this film was so stinking loud. The DTS mix was the loudest of the bunch: it was one of those "is that auditorium 4 again?"


AJG
 

Wes

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The differences between DTS and DD have been minimized since the studios cut the DTS bit-rate in half.
SPR dts is a lot better than the DD counterpart and it is half dts bit-rate. It's not the bit-rate it's the mix! Most studios have bought their own dts encoders and take the same sound track and run it into the DD and the dts encoders with no spicing up that used to happen by dts so now the formates sound very similar.

I still select dts (even my wife) just cuz it's there but in most case I hear no difference!

Wes
 

greg_t

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Wes is right. Some of the most agressive DTS mixes are half bitrate, such as Saving Private Ryan, the Haunting DTS, U-571, Fast and Furious DTS, and Gladiator. It's really in the mix. The DTS laserdiscs were mixed by DTS themselves and used a bitrate of 1235kbps, not fullbitrate like is typically believed. For dvd, the studios do the mixing. I still prefer DTS. It seems to me that the sound is just crisper and more alive. I think dolby suffers from the necessity to have to downmix to anything.
 

Paul_Stachniak

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Actually, the FOTR theatrical DVD was even louder than the EE in the LFE department, almost to a ridiculous degree.
Rich, I completely agree with you. Gone for the DTS EE was this amazing LFE from the opening prologue when Suron, upon being defeated, lets out this large shock wave. I loved that effect. And couldn't wait for the EE to hear it in DTS.

Alas, it was not there. That really ticked me off. I think, it still exists in the DD track, but I'd have to double check that.
 

greg_t

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The dolby digital is pretty cooked on FOTR, especially the LFE. Even so, I still prefer the DD on the original 2 disc set over the DTS on the EE.
 

Jeff Kleist

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Rich, I completely agree with you. Gone for the DTS EE was this amazing LFE from the opening prologue when Suron, upon being defeated, lets out this large shock wave. I loved that effect. And couldn't wait for the EE to hear it in DTS.
Considering that the low end is the least comparative area of the sound codecs, I don't see how it would have been different. The only difference is that DTS likely would have been 4db louder. The big difference in codecs comes with the highs, which are much harder to reproduce, not the lows

The Sauron LFE was way way cooked too loud. It wasn't like that theatrically, and it shouldn't have been like that at home
 

Paul_Stachniak

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The Sauron LFE was way way cooked too loud. It wasn't like that theatrically, and it shouldn't have been like that at home
Well sometimes the best things happen by accident. Sadly, they had to remove the sfx. But that's just me. Oh and my friend's brother, who noticed that too.
 

Jeff Kleist

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Paul, that LFE busted my friend's TV speaker. It now rattles in its housing now. That was just LFE for the sake of LFE. Might I suggest "The Atomic Bomb Movie"?
 

Paul_Stachniak

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So, I'm supposed to hate it because it ruined someone elses speaker?.

I'm sorry that happened with your friend, but I liked that effect.

Also, where might I get this "Atomic Bomb Movie"? :D
 

Richard Kim

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I also prefer the FOTR:EE DTS mix to the theatrical DVD.

As for Die Another Day, I listened to it in DTS, and the quiet scenes were ok, but the action scenes were insanely loud. I guess it was designed this way by the filmmakers, but for me, it was an unpleasant experience.
 

greg_t

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I don't think anyone's telling you to hate it. It's your call what you like and what you don't. The point is that the LFE on the Dolby Digital seems to be overcooked and does not seem to be true to the theatrical experience, at least not in the theater I saw it in. The DTS on the EE doesn't seem to be cooked and is smoother, so it may be that it is more theatrically accurate. I myself still prefer the DD on the 2 disk, the battle scenes are just outstanding demos, and I think it sounds just as involving as the DTS. Bring on the Two Towers DVD!!
 

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