Hole cutting after veneering

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jim Robbins, Jun 7, 2001.

  1. Jim Robbins

    Jim Robbins Stunt Coordinator

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    What methods have you guys tried for this? I have cut holes before using an exacto knife, but these were for surface mount drivers and the hole could not be seen. The speakers I am presently building have recessed mounts so any bad cutting will show.
     
  2. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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  3. Jim Robbins

    Jim Robbins Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks Pat!
     
  4. Hank Frankenberg

    Hank Frankenberg Cinematographer

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    Jim, on all but two of the cabinets I've built, I do the driver holes and recesses first, as the thread suggests, then I us and Xacto knife to cut through the veneer. It's easy because the outline of the recess outer diameter is telgraphed through the veneer in the process of applying great pressure rubbing down the veneer for good adhesion. Just follow that outline carefully, cutting a bit inside the diameter, then go back and final trim by using sawing motions, with the downstroke being your cutting stroke so you don't lift the veneer edge. You can then do final smoothing with very fine grit sandpaper. This description seems involved, but to me, it's about as fast as the whole process of setting up a router with two bit and depth changes. As I always say, try both processes on scrap and go with the one you're most comfortable with.
     
  5. SteveMc

    SteveMc Stunt Coordinator

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    I would think that using a router may cause the veneer to possible chip wouldn't it? To be safe, definately router in a bit from the desired diameter and then sand down to what you need. I've always found that a carpenters knife and sand paper was pretty simple, but I have never tried a router on veneer. I was too afraid it would chip it.
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  6. Will Ernst

    Will Ernst Agent

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    I'm not speaking from personal experience, but I've read over and over how a router is ideal for veneer with a pattern bit or a flush trimmer. After all a laminate trimmer is just a small router.
    -will
     
  7. Jim Robbins

    Jim Robbins Stunt Coordinator

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    I'll try it this weekend using a scrap first and let you know which method works. I may also try a dremel with a tiny router/cutting bit.
     
  8. Doug Eck

    Doug Eck Auditioning

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    I believe the router method described in Patrick's reply is the best option. However, if for some reason you don't want to use a router, using a "hook" blade in a utility knife worked the best out of all the methods I tried in my pre-router days. The knife never slips, and the outside of the hook (which won't cut) helps to guide the knife around the outside edge of the rebate.
     

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