Hockey pucks to float floor for room within a room?

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by bjolish, Oct 3, 2006.

  1. bjolish

    bjolish Auditioning

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2006
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm planning out my theater layout, and looking at the various ways to float the floor for the "room within a room." Has anyone thought about using actual hockey pucks under the base plates and plywood? (Maybe you could use construction adhesive to glue them to the concrete floor?) You can buy pucks for under a dollar each, and they should be able to bear a significant amount of weight.

    Another idea is to put sand in between the pucks, so as to deaden the air gap between the plywood and concrete.

    I'd appreciate your feedback.
     
  2. PAPutzback

    PAPutzback Auditioning

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2006
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Sounds expensive and messy. Why not use strips of 1/2 inch material (Wood - styrofoam) attached to the floor with adhesive and then lay your floor on top of that with adhesive. Are we talking a concrete basement floor or a floor over joists. Over joists I would think you could use the concept of staggered studs to lay some furring strips in between the joists and then put your sub floor on that. I'm a noob and just guessing. I imagine the pros have a better idea.
     
  3. BruceSpielbauer

    BruceSpielbauer Second Unit

    Joined:
    May 27, 2002
    Messages:
    275
    Likes Received:
    0
    Actually, quite a few do it yourselfers have made use of hockey pucks to "float" a stage, or a riser. I have read of probably dozen or so different builds which did this.

    Here is one example -- you will have to scroll down, but you should eventually see a large picture with a huge riser, with hockey pucks mounted underneath to try to help with sound isolation. Many people have also done this to their stage, with the idea that their subwoofer would sit on top, and the hockey pucks could absorb much of that low frequency vibration before it can begin to transfer vibration to the floor below it.

    http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...&&#post7285109

    You should read that thread above, as it includes dicsussion as to what negative effects might result if too many hockey pucks were used, spaced too closely together.


    Now, I do not specifically recall any builds where the entire floor was raised on hockey pucks.

    However, there is a company named Auralex which manufacturers "U-Boats." These are rubber isolation devices which are often used beneath bottom plates. A simple Google search will probably track them down.

    -Bruce
     

Share This Page