Hitachi 61sbx59b question

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Dave Darrow, May 20, 2002.

  1. Dave Darrow

    Dave Darrow Auditioning

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    I just got one of these for a great price from a friend (vs what I've found it selling for on internet ads) and now that I've got it installed I had a question about resolution. The specs claim 1000 lines but I don't know of any input that will give it near that much resolution.
    I read these 2 articles on ProjectorCentral.com:
    http://www.projectorcentral.com/cons...=video_signals
    http://www.projectorcentral.com/cons...m?ci=component
    and as far as I can tell, there is no way to get non-interlaced video or high resolution video with this tv no matter what I plug into it. Why do they bother putting 1000 lines of resolution in a tv if there is no way to use it? Am I missing something?
    d3 `-{>
     
  2. Steve Schaffer

    Steve Schaffer Producer

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    Claimed lines of resolution is a sorta meaningless spec for tvs in any case. The higher the frequency of the input, the higher this number will be, and no two mfgs measure it at the same frequency. It refers to how many individual vertical lines (think picket fence) can be displayed across the width of the screen without them blending into each other. Since this has nothing to do with horizontal SCAN lines or progressive vs interlaced scan, it's entirely possible for an analog set like yours to produce more horizontal resolution than an HD ready model.

    You are correct in your assumption that the SBX59B will not accept or display anything but a 480i scanrate--no HD or Progressive scan dvd.

    However, the SBX59B series Hitachis are about the best analog rptvs around. Properly adjusted they can produce amazing color and detail. I had the 53SBX59B for 2 years and loved it. Ya just gotta sit far enough away so the scanlines aren't too distracting.

    Since they won't do a squeeze for anamorphic dvd, it's important to get a player that does good anamorphic downconversion. Sonys are a bit soft, Toshibas a bit jaggy, Panasonics are a good compromise.
     
  3. Dave Darrow

    Dave Darrow Auditioning

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    Thanx for your helpful reply. That is exactly what I was expecting to hear, that "1000 lines" is as meaningless as "100 watts" in amplifier power.

    When you say "properly adjusted" is this based on user-accessible controls? If so, where can I find guidelines on perfecting these controls?

    For now I'm using a Toshiba SD-3109 with it and haven't noticed too many jaggies with it.

    d3 `-{>
     
  4. Steve Schaffer

    Steve Schaffer Producer

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    Dave,

    I'd strongly suggest you get a copy of the AVIA Guide to Home Theater dvd--it's a calibration disc that takes you through adjusting the user controls to get the best possible picture from your set. It may be hard to find in local stores, but online dvd vendors have it.

    It's a bit pricey at about $30-40, but is really a valuable tool. In addition walking you through video calibration it also has test tones and instructions for setting up and balancing out your 5.1 audio system.

    On my 53SBX59B, I typically had Contrast set at about 30-35%, Brightness 50-60%, Color about 30%, Tint centered, color temp Warm. Turn off Super Contrast and never use the full auto mode. Auto Color is a matter of choice--conventional wisdom is to leave it off, but on the SBX59B models it seems to actually make fleshtones more subtle and realistic.

    These settings looked best in a dimly lit room, which is what you want for most HT stuff. For more brightly lit rooms, just turn up contrast, but never go over about 45-50%.

    Each individual set is a bit different, so my settings are just gonna get you in the ballpark.

    For video games, to avoid burn in, turn contrast down to about 20-25%, dim the lights, and don't pause the game for long. I played lots of video games and surfed the net for hours with my webtv at these settings and never had any burn in.

    As far as anamorphic downconversion and jaggies, this is a matter of personal taste. Many prefer the super sharp image of the Tosh. I had a 3109 connected to my set for about 8 months and the jaggies were visible in some scenes, but overall to my taste it was preferable to the softness of the Sonys.
     

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