"Hiroshima, Mon Amour" and "Ali - Fear Eats the Soul"

Discussion in 'DVD' started by MattHenderson, Jul 7, 2003.

  1. MattHenderson

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    I got shot down for asking about a review of the new "Manhunter" DVD, as I didn't remember the search feature. Well, I used the search feature and found out the details on that release, but couldn't find any reviews of "Hiroshima, Mon Amour" or "Ali - Fear Eats the Soul." Can some kind-hearted soul please provide the low-down on these discs? I know what is supposed to be included on the discs, but how are the transfers, extras, etc.? Thanks!

    Matt



    P.S. - Very excited about the "Wings of Desire" release, seems like MGM did a good job. Now when are we getting my favorite Wenders film, "Paris, Texas?"
     
  2. Deepak Shenoy

    Deepak Shenoy Supporting Actor

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  3. Jon Robertson

    Jon Robertson Screenwriter

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    Another hearty recommendation for Ali: Fear Eats The Soul. Not only an extraordinary and heartbreaking piece of filmmaking, but a sensational transfer and an entire second disc full of extras. Unmissable.
     
  4. Mark Zimmer

    Mark Zimmer Producer

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    Since no one has addressed Hiroshima, mon amour, I'll take a stab. I didn't review it for dOc, but I did watch it Saturday so it's still fresh in my mind. It's very slow-moving, and there's not really much of a plot: it starts off as a documentary about Hiroshima and then evolves into a slightly cryptic story of an affair in 1959 Hiroshima between a French actress and a Japanese architect (though the commentary refers to him as an engineer at one point--there seems to be a translation issue somewhere). Along the way we learn more about the woman's past and how she came to her current situation. It has some intense moments but it's a very interior drama. Don't expect any action.

    The video transfer is utterly outstanding. I've never seen such a gorgeous black-and-white rendering on DVD. I can't stop raving about how beautiful a job Criterion did on this; it looks like film and there is an incredible amount of detail. The audio claims to have been restored but it's a fairly noisy and nasty-sounding mono (I like mono just fine, but this doesn't sound good at all). I suppose there's a limit to what wonders could be done with the original audio.

    Criterion regular Peter Cowie provides a very good commentary to the picture, giving a fair amount of historical background as well as giving Resnais' work a context. There are also interviews with Resnais and star Emmanuelle Riva both at the time and from years afterwards (Riva's modern interview is brand new and quite engaging). It's definitely a worthwhile addition to the Criterion Collection.

    I haven't gotten to Ali yet, though, so I will remain silent on that count.
     

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